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Donald Trump calls for ban on Muslims entering in US

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Washinton: In the aftermath of last week’s mass shooting in California by a Muslim couple, Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump called for a temporary but total ban on Muslims entering the United States.

Trump said that until the lawmakers figure out what to do, a block should be put there. He said that there was hatred for the Americans in a large segment of the Muslims population.

 He had called for surveillance against mosques and database for all the Muslims previously. The massacre which left 14 people dead is the reason behind Trump’s comment.While, other rival Presidential runners including Jeb Bush slammed his remarks, but many of his supporter showed their support on social media.

Trump’s comments can be associated with the prevalent Islamophobia. He is trying to turn this fear into the votes which would help his Presidential chances.

The number of hate crimes against a specific religion such as the California shooting is increasing. The stabbing case in London was another example thereof.

Samuel P Huntington had written in his book ‘Clash of Civilizations’ that a clash between different religious cultures was the probability in the 21st century especially between Islam and Christianity.

It seems to be coming true. For with each day, the hatred in the name of the religion is getting only stronger.

Trump is an example of this case where a person is influencing millions in order to fulfill his political dreams. A lot of common people who have some stereotypical fears about a specific religion or its followers, get their misconceptions increased because of such leaders.

Trump is playing a high-risk game. He knows this is the only way he can win this election by spreading the fear. This is his USP; he is trying to target a certain feeling that is pro-American and pro-Christian. He wants people to fear because when there will be fear, he can present himself as someone who can get rid of this fear from the society.

He gave such remarks in past as well when he had called for surveillance of mosques and keeping the database of Muslims in the US. This is clearly a strategy where he is using the examples of terrorist attacks and IS to ensure votes for himself.

It seems that Americans do not learn from the history. Trump is creating a monster which will be tough to handle as it grows stronger. This happened in the past as well when the US supported groups later turned into the terrorist organizations and came knocking on their door.

Time will tell how much Americans are going to agree with him but if they do, then there will be some severe consequences.

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Here’s What Can Happen if U.S. Declares Novel Coronavirus a National Emergency

The emergency measures raise constitutional questions

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Last year, Trump was criticized for declaring a national emergency in order to divert military funds to finance construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Pixabay

With the World Health Organization classifying the global coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, U.S. President Donald Trump announced late Wednesday a series of emergency measures, including an unprecedented 30-day suspension of all flights from Europe.

But Trump, who spoke from the Oval Office, stopped short of resorting to an even more dramatic measure urged by some members of Congress: a national emergency proclamation under the 1976 National Emergencies Act.

The administration already has declared the coronavirus outbreak a public health emergency, giving local health officials greater flexibility to respond to the crisis.  A national emergency declaration would put a vast reservoir of additional powers at the president’s disposal by triggering sweeping authorities contained in more than 100 statutes, according to Elizabeth Goitein, director of the Brennan Center for Justice’s Liberty & National Security Program.

“When a president declares an emergency declaration, he at that moment has access to all of the laws that say in a national emergency the president can do X, whether or not those powers relate to the emergency at hand,” Goitein said.

Some of the additional authorities allow for a “reasonable and very measured” response to an emergency, according to Goitein. For example, hospitals could receive regulatory waivers in order to set up off-site facilities.

At the same time, a national emergency declaration also empowers a president to take draconian measures in the name of national security. For example, a president could invoke a 1941 law to shut down the internet and even freeze people’s bank accounts.

Last year, Trump was criticized for declaring a national emergency in order to divert military funds to finance construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

A national emergency declaration can only be overturned by an act of Congress.   More than 30 national emergency declarations made over the past four decades remain in effect.

Although presidents often have a legitimate need to exercise emergency powers, they’ve also faced criticism for using emergencies to curtail civil liberties and civil rights.

History of Mational Emergencies 

During the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln famously suspended the writ of habeas corpus, a guarantee against unlawful detentions. During World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt put more than 100,000 Japanese Americans in internment camps. And after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush expanded the government’s surveillance and other national security powers, some of which were later rolled back by Congress.

“The question will be in this moment, how far does the president go or the Congress go, and what is the fallout in the pushback,” said Kimberly Wehle, a visiting law professor at the American University Washington College of Law. “These are areas where the law isn’t clear.”

In addition to exercising emergency powers, the president has certain nonemergency powers he has used during the coronavirus crisis. For example, Trump invoked the Immigration and Nationality Act 1952 in suspending travel from Europe. Another non-emergency power Trump has exercised: the federal quarantine authority, which was last used in 1963.

“The president doesn’t have to declare an emergency in order to avail himself of that, but we know the president has already done that,” Goitein said.

Locking down communities or otherwise restricting the movements of large groups can conflict with constitutional rights of due process, according legal scholars.

“The due process clause basically says the government can’t restrict your liberty, which would be your ability to move around without some kind of process,” Wehle said. “That’s the first constitutional provision that will come to mind if we’re talking about quarantining people in their homes.”

As of Wednesday, 22 states representing 196 million Americans have declared some type of COVID-related emergency, according to James Hodge, director for public health law and policy, at Arizona State University.

Connection, Covid-19, Coronavirus, Virus, China
With the World Health Organization classifying the global coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, U.S. President Donald Trump announced late Wednesday a series of emergency measures, including an unprecedented 30-day suspension of all flights from Europe. Pixabay

New York state on Tuesday created a “containment zone” around the town of New Rochelle, the epicenter of the outbreak in the state. Schools, places of worship and other large public spaces within 1.6 kilometers of the town of nearly 80,000 residents will shut down for next two weeks, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced.

An emergency declaration allows federal and state authorities to put in place a host of so-called “social distancing measures,” including restricting travel, imposing curfews, dismissing schools, restricting public gatherings and implementing quarantines.

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The emergency measures raise constitutional questions. While quarantining individuals or groups suspected of exposure to COVID-19 is constitutional, creating “cordon sanitaire” or lockdown of groups of communities within or outside “hot zones,” is not, according to Hodge. (VOA)