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US President Donald Trump Needs to Do Better than Tweeting, to Deal with North Korea

President Trump acquitted China of pressuring North Korea to Make Amends Regarding the Use of Nuclear Missiles

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US President Donald Trump. VOA
  • The US planned to use China to pressure the North Korea to make amends regarding the use of the nuclear missile
  • Followed by the death of American Student, Trump acquitted China from the responsibility of pressurizing North Korea to make amends
  • The viable option for the US is if Congress exercises its foreign policies oversight responsibilities by conducting a hearing on the Trump’s North Korea policy

Washington, July 2, 2017:  Since Donald Trump has taken the seat as America’s President, the only threat to America is North Korea which has threatened to launch a fully fledged nuclear war. The report is based on the views presented to thehill.com by Gregory J. Wallance, who is a writer, lawyer, former federal prosecutor, serving as assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York from 1979 to 1985.

Many people feel Trump did a positive thing by addressing North Korea as a threat. Further, the US has planned to use China to pressure the North Korea to make amends regarding the use of nuclear missile because China is North Korea’s major trading partner. In order to reduce trade exports from China to North Korea, US has promised China with better trading terms.

On June 21, 2017, Trump tweeted, “While I greatly appreciate the efforts of President Xi & China to help with North Korea, it has not worked out. At least I know China tried!” as a result of the death of an American college student who was jailed in North Korea who returned to the US in a coma.

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Soon after his tweet, he acquitted China from the responsibility of pressurizing North Korea to make amends which was taken by China in the best possible way. Now, Chinese President Xi Jinping was already unwilling to put pressure on North Korea can say that they tried their best.

Now the US is left with only two options: First is to launch a strike towards North Korea’s missile installations and face retaliation by North Korea resulting in a lot of deaths and the second is likely to wait till the time North Korea developing intercontinental ballistic missiles and that would give them the edge.

So, the viable option for the US is if Congress exercises its foreign policies oversight responsibilities by conducting a hearing on the Donald Trump’s North Korea policy.

A similar model was enacted in 1966 regarding Senate foreign relations committee’s hearings on Vietnam. It was done because, despite the late former President Lyndon B. Johnson’s assessments towards the Vietnam War, they were already losing so many American soldiers.

Conducting hearings like these would require the Trump administration to explain their policy and find better alternatives to actually make China pressurize North Korea and while the 1966 hearings were too late, Donald Trump’s administration still have time to retrace their steps towards the correct path and to make actual policy amendments rather than tweeting about the situation.

– summarised by Sumit Balodi of NewsGram. Twitter: @sumit_balodi

Next Story

Hanoi Summit Can Progress North Korea’s Objectives

North Korea was able to establish this framework with the United States that it is more urgent to establish the confidence-building relationship between these two countries and then we can start nuclear dismantlement.

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U.S and North Korean flags are on sale at a flag shop in Hanoi, Vietnam, Jan. 29, 2019. VOA

With the second summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un one week away, final preparations are underway in Vietnam for the February 27-28 talks in Hanoi. It remains unclear what the outcome between the two leaders will yield, but former North Korean Deputy Ambassador to Britain, Thae Yong Ho, told reporters Tuesday that Pyongyang’s long term goal was to remove the U.S. and United Nations presence from the Korean peninsula.

During Kim Jong Un’s New Year’s speech, he said Pyongyang called for a “staged approach” for the creation of a “peace regime” on the Korean Peninsula, said Thae.

He explained that Kim suggested a buffer zone be created that would reduce the possibility of military conflict between the two Koreas and for it to be gradually expanded from the border between the two Koreas throughout the whole peninsula as one way of achieving peace.

Thae said if President Trump issues an end of war declaration at the Hanoi summit, which many analysts say is possible, then North Korea could assert there is no reason for the U.N. Command to remain on the peninsula, because the “reason for the U.N. Command is to prevent any possible military confrontations between the two Koreas.”

Speaking at the Chey Institute for Advanced Studies in Seoul last week, Bruce Bennett, senior defense researcher at the RAND Corporation, also identified possible long-term objectives for Kim Jong Un.

“I think he wants to see U.S. disengagement from the peninsula, I think he wants to be in a position where he can put significant pressure on South Korea, and I think he needs to solidify his internal support,” said Bennett.

Regardless of the analysis by intelligence agencies and experts, Bennett said Kim’s objectives are not governed by what “we” think is possible for North Korea to achieve.

“What matters for him (Kim Jong Un), that’s what he thinks he can accomplish, because that’s going to drive those actions,” said Bennett.

Denuclearization

Speaking to reporters in the Oval Office Tuesday, President Trump expects “a lot of things will come out” of the second summit with Kim Jong Un.

He called the upcoming meeting “very exciting,” but said Washington’s ultimate goal is North Korea’s denuclearization.

“I think we will see that ultimately. I have no pressing time schedule,” the president said, adding, “As long as there’s no testing, I’m in no rush. If there’s testing, that’s another deal.”

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Instead, the former diplomat suggested that North Korea’s rhetoric was aimed at Washington’s role of establishing a deterrent for conflict in the region and that President Trump “fell into his trap.” Pixabay

During President Trump’s State of the Union address, he claimed, “If I had not been elected president of the United States, we would right now, in my opinion, be in a major war with North Korea with potentially millions of people killed.”

However, on Tuesday, he said the relationship was “far less dangerous and there’s a lot of sanity, a lot of really sane thinking.”

But Thae said there never really was a threat of war to the United States posed by North Korea.

Instead, the former diplomat suggested that North Korea’s rhetoric was aimed at Washington’s role of establishing a deterrent for conflict in the region and that President Trump “fell into his trap.”

“The fact that President Trump spoke at the General Assembly of the United Nations and proclaimed that there is a real possibility of a war, [was] a major strategic mistake,” said Thae.

He went on further to say the belief that the United States and North Korea were on a nuclear “collision course” was a result of North Korean manipulation.

Thae stated Kim Jong Un had successfully shifted the focus on North Korea to the strengthening of relations and establishing peace for nuclear disarmament.

“North Korea was able to establish this framework with the United States that it is more urgent to establish the confidence-building relationship between these two countries and then we can start nuclear dismantlement,” he said.

Bennett was unsure Kim would agree to fully abandon his nuclear weapons program, even if an end of war declaration is made.

If President Trump makes the declaration, Bennett said, “It’s got to end the broader war and lead to a real condition of peace as opposed to the appearance of peace.”

U.S.
Moon said South Korea was “determined to take up that role if President Trump asks, if that’s the way to lessen the U.S. burden,” according to Moon’s spokesman Kim Eui-kyeom. (Pixabay)

Hanoi preparations

The State Department announced Tuesday that U.S. Special Representative for North Korea, Stephen Biegun, was en route to Hanoi in preparation for the summit.

“A lot of things are being discussed and we are very much looking forward to next week,” said deputy spokesperson Robert Palladino.

Kim Hyok-chol, Biegun’s North Korean counterpart, was also spotted in Beijing Tuesday, and it has been assumed he would be traveling to Vietnam as well.

In a phone call with President Trump Tuesday, South Korean President Moon Jae-in spoke about the upcoming second U.S.-North Korea summit.

A statement from South Korea’s presidential office said Moon offered his country’s assistance to President Trump as a “concession” to Pyongyang in order to expedite North Korea’s denuclearization.

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That could include anything from reconnecting rail and road links between the two Koreas to other inter-Korean economic cooperation.

Moon said South Korea was “determined to take up that role if President Trump asks, if that’s the way to lessen the U.S. burden,” according to Moon’s spokesman Kim Eui-kyeom. (VOA)