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Donald Trump to announce Decision on Paris Climate pact: US leaning on the withdrawal side

If USA withdraws from the 2015 agreement,it is expected to have serious international consequences

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Presidential encyclopedias
US President Donald Trump, VOA
  • Donald Trump met with world leaders at the G7 Summit in Sicily where many set out to lobby the US president over staying committed to the climate agreement
  • The US did not join the climate section of the communiqué according to the official dispatch of the summit on which all countries sign
  • All the nations of the G7 summit, France, Japan, Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, have also urged Trump to stay in the 2015 agreement

Washington, June 1, 2017: US President Donald Trump is still to give his decision about whether USA will remain a part of the Paris Climate agreement or not and the president seems to be leaning towards the withdrawal side as signaled by the white house.

Last Saturday morning, during the final leg of his first presidential trip abroad, the president teased his decision about the hotly debated topic in a tweet.

Trump met with world leaders this week at the G7 Summit in Sicily where many set out to lobby the US president over staying committed to the climate agreement.

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The US did not join the climate section of the communiqué according to the official dispatch of the summit on which all countries sign, mentioned NDTV report.

The document stated while the leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom and the presidents of the European Council and of the European Commission are propounding their commitment to the Paris agreement, the US “is in the process of reviewing its policies on climate change and on the Paris Agreement and thus is not in a position to join the consensus on these topics.”

The document stated while the leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom and the presidents of the European Council and of the European Commission are propounding their commitment to the Paris agreement, the US “is in the process of reviewing its policies on climate change and on the Paris Agreement and thus is not in a position to join the consensus on these topics.”

Here it is to be noted that during his Presidential Campaigning Trump had vowed that he would “rip” the Paris Climate Agreement. It seems like the president is all set to fulfill his that promise.

However, if that happens there will be serious international consequences as this will raise a question on the commitment of the world’s super power towards curbing environmental problems.

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Trump has said that he will announce his decision today in the White House Rose Garden.
The White House officials are indicating that the President may change his mind, as is his habit of doing on the last moment.

All the nations of the G7 summit, France, Japan, Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, have also urged Trump to stay in the 2015 agreement.

– prepared by Nikita Tayal of NewsGram, Twitter: @NikitaTayal6 

  • vedika kakar

    I dont understand what hate Donald Trump has towards the earth and the environment He is not only destroying America but also creating unrest in the entire world.

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Diversifying Crops will Lighten Growing Climate Impact in India: Study

To reach this conclusion, the authors combined historical data on crop yields, temperature and rainfall

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diversifying crops, climate impact
"Expanding the area planted with these four alternative grains can reduce variations in Indian grain production caused by extreme climate, especially in the many places where their yields are comparable to rice. Wikimedia Commons

Diversifying the crops in India can be an effective way to adapt its food-production systems to the growing influence of extreme climate change, said US researchers including Indian-origin.

The team studied the effects of climate change on five major crops: finger millet, maize, pearl millet, sorghum and rice which make up the vast majority of grain production during the June-to-September monsoon season in India — with rice contributing three-quarters of the grain supply for the season.

Taken together, the five grains are essential for meeting India’s nutritional needs. In a paper published in Environmental Research Letters, Kyle Davis, environmental data scientist from the Data Science Institute at Columbia University found that the yields from grains such as millet, sorghum and maize are more resilient to extreme weather.

Their yields vary significantly less due to year-to-year changes in climate and generally experience smaller declines during droughts. But yields from rice, India’s main crop, experience larger declines during extreme weather conditions.

climate impact, diversifying crops
Their yields vary significantly less due to year-to-year changes in climate and generally experience smaller declines during droughts. Wikimedia Commons

“By relying more and more on a single crop — rice — India’s food supply is potentially vulnerable to the effects of varying climate,” said Davis, the lead author on the paper.

“Expanding the area planted with these four alternative grains can reduce variations in Indian grain production caused by extreme climate, especially in the many places where their yields are comparable to rice.

“Doing so will mean that the food supply for the country’s massive and growing population is less in jeopardy during times of drought or extreme weather,” he noted.

The co-authors on the paper are Ashwini Chhatre, Associate Professor at the Indian School of Business in Hyderabad; Narasimha D. Rao, Assistant Professor at Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies; Deepti Singh, Assistant Professor at Washington State University in Vancouver; and Ruth DeFries, University Professor of Ecology and Sustainable Development at Columbia University.

diversifying crops, climate impact
To reach this conclusion, the authors combined historical data on crop yields, temperature and rainfall. Wikimedia Commons

Temperatures and rainfall amounts in India vary from year-to-year and influence the amount of crops that farmers can produce.

With episodes of extreme climate such as droughts and storms becoming more frequent, it’s essential to find ways to protect India’s crop production from these shocks, according to Davis.

ALSO READ: Conflict and Climate Change Largely Responsible for Rising Global Hunger, Finds Study

To reach this conclusion, the authors combined historical data on crop yields, temperature and rainfall. Data on the yields of each crop came from state agricultural ministries across India and covered 46 years (1966-2011) and 593 of India’s 707 districts.

“This study adds to the evidence that increasing the production of alternative grains in India can offer benefits for improving nutrition, for saving water, and for reducing energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture,” said Davis. (IANS)