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Donald Trump to announce Decision on Paris Climate pact: US leaning on the withdrawal side

If USA withdraws from the 2015 agreement,it is expected to have serious international consequences

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US President Donald Trump, VOA
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  • Donald Trump met with world leaders at the G7 Summit in Sicily where many set out to lobby the US president over staying committed to the climate agreement
  • The US did not join the climate section of the communiqué according to the official dispatch of the summit on which all countries sign
  • All the nations of the G7 summit, France, Japan, Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, have also urged Trump to stay in the 2015 agreement

Washington, June 1, 2017: US President Donald Trump is still to give his decision about whether USA will remain a part of the Paris Climate agreement or not and the president seems to be leaning towards the withdrawal side as signaled by the white house.

Last Saturday morning, during the final leg of his first presidential trip abroad, the president teased his decision about the hotly debated topic in a tweet.

Trump met with world leaders this week at the G7 Summit in Sicily where many set out to lobby the US president over staying committed to the climate agreement.

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The US did not join the climate section of the communiqué according to the official dispatch of the summit on which all countries sign, mentioned NDTV report.

The document stated while the leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom and the presidents of the European Council and of the European Commission are propounding their commitment to the Paris agreement, the US “is in the process of reviewing its policies on climate change and on the Paris Agreement and thus is not in a position to join the consensus on these topics.”

The document stated while the leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom and the presidents of the European Council and of the European Commission are propounding their commitment to the Paris agreement, the US “is in the process of reviewing its policies on climate change and on the Paris Agreement and thus is not in a position to join the consensus on these topics.”

Here it is to be noted that during his Presidential Campaigning Trump had vowed that he would “rip” the Paris Climate Agreement. It seems like the president is all set to fulfill his that promise.

However, if that happens there will be serious international consequences as this will raise a question on the commitment of the world’s super power towards curbing environmental problems.

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Trump has said that he will announce his decision today in the White House Rose Garden.
The White House officials are indicating that the President may change his mind, as is his habit of doing on the last moment.

All the nations of the G7 summit, France, Japan, Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, have also urged Trump to stay in the 2015 agreement.

– prepared by Nikita Tayal of NewsGram, Twitter: @NikitaTayal6 

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  • vedika kakar

    I dont understand what hate Donald Trump has towards the earth and the environment He is not only destroying America but also creating unrest in the entire world.

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Climate change can have an effect on the taste of the wines

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Climate change can have an effect on the taste of the wine
Climate change can have an effect on the taste of the wine. wikimedia commons

New York, Jan 3, 2018: Although winegrowers seem reluctant to try new grape varieties apparently to protect the taste of the wines, new research suggests that they will ultimately have to give up on their old habit as planting lesser-known grape varieties might help vineyards to counteract some of the effects of climate change.

vineyards. wikimedia commons

“It’s going to be very hard, given the amount of warming we’ve already committed to… for many regions to continue growing the exact varieties they’ve grown in the past,” said study co-author Elizabeth Wolkovich, Assistant Professor at Harvard University.

“With continued climate change, certain varieties in certain regions will start to fail — that’s my expectation,” she said.

The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, suggests that wine producers now face a choice — proactively experiment with new varieties, or risk suffering the negative consequences of climate change.

“The Old World has a huge diversity of wine grapes — there are overplanted 1,000 varieties — and some of them are better adapted to hotter climates and have higher drought tolerance than the 12 varieties now making up over 80 per cent of the wine market in many countries,” Wolkovich said.

“We should be studying and exploring these varieties to prepare for climate change,” she added.

Unfortunately, Wolkovich said, convincing wine producers to try different grape varieties is difficult at best, and the reason often comes down to the current concept of terroir.

Terroir is the notion that a wine’s flavour is a reflection of where which and how the grapes were grown.

Thus, as currently understood, only certain traditional or existing varieties are part of each terroir, leaving little room for change.

The industry — both in the traditional winegrowing centres of Europe and around the world — faces hurdles when it comes to making changes, Wolkovich said.

In Europe, she said, growers have the advantage of tremendous diversity.

They have more than 1,000 grape varieties to choose from. Yet strict labelling laws have created restrictions on their ability to take advantage of this diversity.

For example, just three varieties of grapes can be labelled as Champagne or four for Burgundy.

Similar restrictions have been enacted in many European regions – all of which force growers to focus on a small handful of grape varieties.

“The more you are locked into what you have to grow, the less room you have to adapt to climate change,” Wolkovich said.

New World winegrowers, meanwhile, must grapple with the opposite problem — while there are few, if any, restrictions on which grape varieties may be grown in a given region, growers have little experience with the diverse — and potentially more climate change adaptable — varieties of grapes found in Europe, the study said.

Just 12 varieties account for more than 80 per cent of the grapes grown in Australian vineyards, Wolkovich said.

More than 75 per cent of all the grapes grown in China is Cabernet Sauvignon — and the chief reason why has to do with consumers.

“They have all the freedom in the world to import new varieties and think about how to make great wines from a grape variety you’ve never heard of, but they’re not doing it because the consumer hasn’t heard of it,” Wolkovich said. (IANS)