Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Smartphones had been getting increasingly more capable and uptake was growing substantially year on year. Pixabay

By Austin Hode

You’d be forgiven if when asked to recall something poignant about 2003 you struggled somewhat, it wasn’t perhaps the most standout of years, one which doesn’t immediately leap out as being particularly memorable. However, folk is quick to forget and even the most action-packed of years can be difficult to recall at all over a decade later. For clarity, I’ll give you a quick flashback to what was a pretty interesting year.


On its re-entry to Earth’s atmosphere the space shuttle Columbia carrying seven astronauts exploded after a piece of foam had come free on launch and hit the shuttle’s wing, Dolly, who had earlier become the world’s first cloned sheep, died at the age of just six years old, over 1 million people demonstrated in London against the war with Iraq, and David Beckham signed for Real Madrid.

Follow NewsGram on Instagram to keep yourself updated.

Something else, a seemingly insignificant event, happened in 2003 that would change the face of mobile phone ownership forever. Following the release of the first mobile phone, a clunky Motorola costing over £3000, many years earlier, smartphones had been getting increasingly more capable and uptake was growing substantially year on year. Many millions of people across the globe were regularly using smartphones in their daily lives. As the number of smartphones in circulation grew rapidly and tracing them become necessary for many reasons, 2003 saw the introduction of the modern-day IMEI.

The IMEI, standing for International Mobile Equipment Identity is essentially a unique number registered to smartphones which are often found printed inside the battery compartment. GSM networks use the IMEI number to identify mobile devices and can restrict the access of stolen phones to global networks. The IMEI stays with a mobile device from its inception and can be used as a marker of what that device is and what its status is throughout its life span. As well as being useful for those wanting to block the use of their stolen phones and authorities wanting to track folk, the IMEI can be useful for buyers, particularly those keen to buy on the second-hand smartphone market.


The IMEI, standing for International Mobile Equipment Identity. Pixabay

How can the IMEI number help smartphone buyers?

As the global market for smartphones grows exponentially and devices become more expensive more consumers opt to take out network contracts to purchase the latest devices. It is more common than ever for people to upgrade their device after little more than a year of ownership. Technology evolves so quickly that within 12 months a new model is released and insatiable demand means buyers are more than eager to trade in their current model no matter how long they’ve had it and fork out for the latest release. There is, however, an upside to this, it has created a booming second-hand smartphone market the world over.

As consumers trade devices more frequently, there are more nearly new devices for savvy customers to pick up for bargain prices. These handsets are often just a year or two old and are perfectly functional with the latest applications and software. However as with any purchase of a second-hand good, there are risks, these risks are amplified when buying online given the relative disconnect between buyer and seller. Essentially the buyer must trust the seller that the smartphone they are selling is not only the actual model presented but also that the status of the device is functional, and it has not been blocked by the network before purchase.

ALSO READ: Amid The Pandemic, Average Time Spent On Smartphones Increased By 25%

So, for example, if you wanted to buy a T-Mobile device online in the second-hand market you could request the device’s IMEI from the seller and use a simple tmobile IMEI Check service to check the status of that device and the model specification. The IMEI Check tmobile prospective buyers can access online will give them a sense of security that they are not going to receive a locked or stolen device which they cannot use but also that the specification the seller has provided is accurate.

Before you purchase a smartphone online make sure you use an online IMEI check service to check the status, and while you’re at it it’s worth unlocking the device and saving yourself a ton of money.

(Disclaimer: The article is sponsored, and hence promotes some commercial links.)


Popular

Unsplash

NASA has launched the 'Deep Space Food Challenge'.

NASA will pay up to $1 million to people who can come up with innovative and sustainable food production ideas to feed astronauts in space, as the US space agency prepares to send astronauts further into the cosmos than ever before. Giving future explorers the technology to produce nutritious, tasty, and satisfying meals on long-duration space missions will give them the energy required to uncover the great unknown. In coordination with the Canadian Space Agency, NASA has launched the 'Deep Space Food Challenge' that calls on teams to design, build, and demonstrate prototypes of food production technologies that provide tangible nutritional products -- or food.

Also Read : NASA introduces 18 astronauts for Lunar program

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

People with moderate or greater symptoms of depression were more likely to believe at least 1 of 4 false statements about Covid-19 vaccines.

People suffering from depression are more likely to believe vaccine-related misinformation, according to a new study. The study found that people with moderate or greater symptoms of depression were more likely to believe at least 1 of 4 false statements about Covid-19 vaccines.

Those who believed the statements to be true were half as likely to be vaccinated, the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, indicated. 'It is clear the pandemic has taken a heavy toll on the mental health of Americans, especially young people," said researcher Katherine Ognyanova from Rutgers University, the US.

woman sitting on black chair in front of glass-panel window with white curtains People suffering from depression are more likely to believe vaccine-related misinformation. | Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

It is estimated that millions of pieces of space debris orbit around Earth.

The space economy is on track to be valued at a trillion dollars by the end of 2030, but assets such as navigation, weather and communication satellites that serve our society daily are threatened by space debris, an Indian-American professor has stressed. According to NASA, it is estimated that millions of pieces of space debris orbit around Earth. A major portion of these objects as well as active satellites reside in the low-Earth orbit region, at altitudes between 200 km and 1,000 km. In November last year, Russia destroyed one of its own satellites with a ground-based missile, creating thousands of pieces of debris that passed through the International Space Station (ISS).

Also Read : Scientists to predict space weather faster

Keep reading... Show less