Tuesday June 25, 2019

Don’t miss NASA’s first ever live 4K video stream from Space: Peggy Whitson to take viewers 400 km off Earth on April 26

The broadcast will take place at 1:30 p.m. EDT during a session at the 2017 National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in Las Vegas

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NASA Headquarter in USA, VOA

Washington, April 12, 2017: In the first-ever live 4K video stream from space, NASA astronaut and Expedition 51 commander Peggy Whitson will take viewers more than 400 km off the Earth to the International Space Station on April 26.

The broadcast will take place at 1:30 p.m. EDT during a session at the 2017 National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in Las Vegas.

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“The US space agency is a pioneer in the application of advanced media — including 4K. By streaming real-time video that captures images four times the resolution of current HD technology, NASA is enhancing its ability to observe, uncover and adapt new knowledge of orbital and deep space,” the National Association of Broadcasters said in a statement.

To experience the full effect online, devices capable of viewing 4K UHD content will be required, however, lower resolution streams of the live broadcast will be available on NASA Television, NASA’s Facebook page and the agency’s website, the US space agency said.

The conversation with Whitson will take place as part of a panel called “Reaching for the Stars: Connecting to the Future with NASA and Hollywood.”

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The panel will explore how advanced imaging and cloud technologies are taking scientific research and filmmaking to the next level, and will be moderated by Carolyn Giardina, technology editor for the Hollywood Reporter.

The panel is co-produced by NAB Show, NASA, and Amazon Web Services (AWS), and will explore how advanced imaging and cloud technologies are taking scientific research and filmmaking to the next level.

During this event, Whitson will speak with Sam Blackman, CEO of AWS Elemental. (IANS)

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Human Sperm Retains Viability in Outer Space Conditions: Researchers

The study was presented at an annual meeting of European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Vienna, Austria

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Each sperm has 37.5MB of DNA information in it.
Each sperm has 37.5MB of DNA information in it.

Researchers have found that human sperm retains its complete viability within the different gravitational conditions found in outer space.

The results could be a huge boost to zillionaires like Amazon founder Jeff Bezos who see the “colonisation” of space as an answer to the Earth’s ever threatened resources.

“If the number of space missions increases in the coming years, and are of longer duration, it is important to study the effects of long-term human exposure to space in order to face them,” said Montserrat Boada from Dexeus Women’s Health in Barcelona, whose group worked with microgravity engineers from the Polytechnic University of Barcelona.

“It’s not unreasonable to start thinking about the possibility of reproduction beyond the Earth,” Boada said.

The study was performed using a small aerobatic training aircraft (CAP10), which can provide short-duration hypogravity exposure.

The plane executed a series of 20 parabolic manoeuvres, providing eight seconds of microgravity for each parabola.

Overall, 10 sperm samples obtained from 10 healthy donors were analysed after exposure to the different microgravities found in space and ground gravity.

To overcome regulatory constraints and increase donor numbers, sperm banks in the UK and Australia began to market the act of donating sperm as a confirmation of masculinity. Pixabay

The sperm analysis comprised a full range of measurements currently performed for fertility testing — concentration, motility, vitality, morphology and DNA fragmentation — and results found no difference whatsoever in any of the parameters between the microgravity space samples and the control group samples from Earth.

Indeed, there was 100 per cent concordance in DNA fragmentation rate and vitality, and 90 per cent concordance in sperm concentration and motility, said Boada.

These minor differences, she added, “were more probably related to heterogeneity of the sperm sample than to the effect of exposure to different gravity conditions”.

Boada described this as a preliminary study and her group will now move on to validate the results and then to larger sperm samples, longer periods of microgravity and even fresh sperm.

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One reason for using frozen sperm in this study was the known effect of radiation on fresh sperm, Boada noted.

“Radiation impairs the quality and viability of human sperm, and these effects are expected to be greater on fresh sperm than on frozen samples,” she said.

The study was presented at an annual meeting of European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Vienna, Austria. (IANS)