Monday November 18, 2019

Don’t Stand and Eat, it May Up Stress and also Mute Taste Buds

The vestibular sense, which is responsible for balance, posture and spatial orientation, interacts with the gustatory sensory system

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Stress, Taste Buds, Eat
Posture impacts taste perception, with food tasting better when you are sitting down. Pixabay

Researchers have found that spending more time standing up and eating for even a few minutes prompts physical stress, muting taste buds.

The study, published in the Journal of Consumer Research finds posture impacts taste perception, with food tasting better when you are sitting down.

The researchers looked specifically at how the vestibular sense, which is responsible for balance, posture and spatial orientation, interacts with the gustatory sensory system, which impacts taste and flavour.

“This finding suggests that parents might be able to make unpleasant-tasting, healthy foods seem more palatable to reluctant children by having them eat standing up (vs. sitting down). In a similar vein, it might be beneficial to maintain a standing posture when consuming pharmaceutical products that have unpleasant tastes,” said study lead author Dipayan Biswas, Professor at the University of South Florida in the US.

Stress, Taste Buds, Eat
Spending more time standing up and eating for even a few minutes prompts physical stress. Pixabay

The research team found that the force of gravity pushes blood to the lower parts of the body, causing the heart to work harder to pump blood back up to the top of the body, accelerating heart rate.

This activates the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis and leads to increased concentrations of the stress hormone cortisol.

This chain reaction reduces sensory sensitivity, which impacts food and beverage taste evaluation, food temperature perception and overall consumption volume.

When people experience discomfort, foods that normally taste good do not appear as pleasant to the palate, said the study.

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The research team confirmed their hypothesis by having 350 participants rate the tastiness of a pita chip. Those who were standing gave it a less favourable rating than those who were sitting in a padded chair.

They expanded the study by inducing additional stress and asked participants to try fruit snacks while carrying a shopping bag. Both sitting and standing participants reported the additional weight made the food item taste even worse. (IANS)

Next Story

Young People Diagnosed with Diabetes May Experience High Stress Levels

In the study, the team evaluated 207 patients who were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the past two years

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Stress
Diabetes care is difficult, because it requires a lifestyle change that you have to do forever, Otherwise it leads to Stress. Pixabay

Young people diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes experience high psychological distress, resulting in worse health outcomes causing High Stress Levels and poor blood sugar control, find researchers from Carnegie Mellon University.

Age plays a critical role in the well-being of people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

“We found we can evaluate a patient’s initial stress and predict how they will be doing six months later,” said Vicki Helgeson, professor of psychology at the university.

“If you can identify people who are facing diabetes distress earlier, you can intervene and prevent their health from declining,” said the findings published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

In the study, the team evaluated 207 patients who were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the past two years.

They found younger patients (42 years and younger) experienced higher diabetes-related and psychological distress.

In addition, patients with higher education and income expressed more stress.

Conversely, older patients (older than 64 years) had less psychological stress and greater consistency in self-care, blood sugar control and medication adherence.

Stress
Young people diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes experience high psychological distress, resulting in worse health outcomes causing High Stress Levels and poor blood sugar control, find researchers from Carnegie Mellon University. Pixabay

Patients in long-term relationships also reported less diabetes stress.

Patients identified diet as the greatest stressor (38 per cent).

Other significant stressors include checking blood sugar (8 per cent) and experiencing high or low blood sugar events (7 per cent).

Patients who self-reported greater stress also reported greater depressed mood, less adherence to medication and higher anxiety.

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“Diabetes care is difficult, because it requires a lifestyle change that you have to do forever,” Helgeson said. “Life gets in the way of sticking to a diabetes regimen.” (IANS)