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Do’s and Don’ts of Wearing Printed Scrubs

Here are the tips to help you maximize your printed uniform

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nurse scrubs and uniform
Nurse scrubs are part of the multi-billion-dollar medical textile industry.

Wearing printed scrubs is not for everybody. For instance, even today, most people believe that the loud patterns are reserved for the pediatric ward or children’s clinics. However, you might be surprised to know that in recent years, more and more nurses are bringing their personalities into their work. 

Nurse scrubs are part of the multi-billion-dollar medical textile industry. The market is expected to reach over $23 billion by 2025, due to the rising demand for elderly care and the regulatory protocols involving the safety of healthcare workers. 

With the size of the industry, you can expect variety as manufacturers want to make sure they cover all the supply spectrum. However, while printed or floral nurse scrubs will help you stand out, it is also quite risky as you might commit a fashion faux pas. 

nurse scrubs and uniform
Wearing printed scrubs is not for everybody. Flickr

Here are the tips to help you maximize your printed uniform:

  1. Do not match prints — Unless you work in pediatrics, you do not combine printed tops and pants. The idea is to break the monotony in the uniform and introduce a splash of color in the scrubs. The cardinal sin you can commit is if you also wear printed crocs or shoes. 
  2. Do avoid too many accessories — Let the nurse scrubs speak for themselves. Wearing accessories will be too much to handle. You do not want to be looking like a giant Christmas tree. If you feel the need, stick to a watch, your wedding ring, and pin earrings. Those who are assigned in critical care are not allowed accessories anyway.
  3. Do find colors that complement your skin tone — While patterns are great to show off your personality, you also have to make sure that they highlight your assets. In other words, if you have a warm skin tone, you can’t opt for a scrub with a dominant coral, violet-red, or honey shade. If you have a cooler skin tone, you must choose patterns with dominant rose, purple, lavender, or blue colors. Red will also work well with neutral skin tones, just like dusty pink or light blue.
  4. Do not forget to act with dignity — You can wear loud colors and still appear professional. People think that patterns may look out of place in a hospital setting. However, a survey involving more than 200 medical professionals showed that more than 72% think that prints do not affect their perception. Only about 27% think that wearing patterns seem unprofessional if you are not into pediatrics. 
  5. Do check the label for clothing care — Make sure you follow the instructions on how to care for the material. One of the drawbacks of buying printed nurse scrubs is that it is more noticeable when the bright colors fade. As a result, you would look disheveled and out of place. The last thing you need is to stand out for all the wrong reasons. In the same vein, even if the stain looks invisible in the printed fabric, it does not mean that you just leave the dirty spot there.
nurse scrubs and uniform
However, while printed or floral nurse scrubs will help you stand out, it is also quite risky as you might commit a fashion faux pas. Flickr

Also Read- SEWA International Organization: Meet The Heroes Helping Fight COVID-19 Crisis

Of course, you should probably steer clear of cartoon characters when choosing prints. There are plenty of elegant-looking prints that will help enhance your personality without appearing to be unprofessional in your work. Remember, you are the one wearing the colorful nursing scrub. Never let the patterns choose you.

[Disclaimer: The article published above promotes links of commercial interests.]

[ Disclaimer: The pictures used in the article are supplied by the author, NewsGram has no intention of infringing copyrights. ]

 

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PC Pal: Lenovo Launches Free Service to Find Devices Based on Lifestyle Needs

The service is designed to simplify the purchase process

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Lenovo
Lenovo launched a free service called PC Pal to help consumers find laptops accordinbg to their personal needs. Wiukimedia Commons

Lenovo on Thursday launched a free service called PC Pal to help consumers find perfect devices based on their lifestyle needs.

According to the company, the service will offer neutral, unbiased recommendations based on individual requirements, to help consumers make informed purchase decisions.

“A lot of consumers in India are looking to buy a PC, many of them for the first time. However, there are so many choices available that it can be difficult for a consumer to decide. This challenge of finding the right laptop can be addressed by PC Pal, by providing expert, impartial advice,” Rahul Agarwal, CEO and Managing Director, Lenovo India said in a statement.

The service is designed to simplify the purchase process and reduce the hassle of selecting the right laptop.

Lenovo Yoga
The service reduces the hassle of selecting the right laptop. Wikimedia Commons

‘PC Pal’ asks a few simple questions and showcases the ideal configuration based on the consumer’s responses.

Also Read: Every 4 in 10 Adults Suffer From Gastrointestinal Disorders Globally: Researchers

Factors considered include the consumer’s computing need, budget, and lifestyle requirements. It will make a recommendation for the right model for that consumer regardless of PC brand.

The service is available by telephone or online. (IANS)

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Every 4 in 10 Adults Suffer From Gastrointestinal Disorders Globally: Researchers

Mostly people find it embarrassing to talk about stomach and bowel symptoms

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gastrointestinal disorders
For every ten adults in the world, four suffer from functional gastrointestinal disorders. Pixabay

For every ten adults in the world, four suffer from functional gastrointestinal disorders of varying severity, say Researchers, adding that people think it’s embarrassing to talk about stomach and bowel symptoms.

Functional gastrointestinal disorders, FGIDs, is a collective term for chronic disorders in the gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms may arise throughout the gastrointestinal tract. From the upper part, the esophagus and stomach, they can include heartburn, acid reflux and indigestion (dyspepsia).For the lower parts (the intestines), chronic constipation, abdominal distension or bloating, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are among the complaints.

The current study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, gives an overall picture of the global prevalence of FGIDs. Data of more than 73,000 people in 33 countries were collected by means of web-based questionnaires and face-to-face (household) interviews.

“It’s striking how similar the findings are between countries. We can see some variations but, in general, these disorders are equally common whatever the country or continent,” said study author Magnus Simren from University of Gothenburg in Sweden.Web-based questionnaires were used in most of the countries in the study.

gastrointestinal disorders
The findings showed that the prevalence of FGIDs was higher in women than in men. Piaxbay

In some countries, instead, the respondents were asked to reply to the questions when an interviewer read them aloud.The questions posed to the respondents were based on the diagnostic criteria for IBS and other FGIDs. Particulars of other diseases and symptoms, living conditions, quality of life, healthcare consumption, etc. were also requested.

Also Read: GoodwillforGood: Vidyut Jammwal Launches Initiative to Support Ideas of Entrepreneurs

The findings showed that the prevalence of FGIDs was higher in women than in men, and clearly associated with lower quality of life. According to the questionnaire responses, 49 per cent of the women and 37 per cent of the men met the diagnostic criteria for at least one FGID. The severity of the disorders varied, from mild discomfort to symptoms that adversely affected the quality of life to a high degree.

The prevalence of FGIDs was also strongly associated with high consumption of healthcare, such as visits to the doctor and use of medication, but also surgery, the study said. (IANS)

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Above 51% Women Believe Indian Schools Don’t Have Menstrual Awareness Programme: Survey

Approximately 60 percent women believe that Indian schools do not have adequate facilities for girls to dispose off sanitary napkins

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"Without the right information, girls often don't know how to safely manage their period.", Manushi was quoted saying. Pixabay

More than 51 percent of women respondents say that Indian schools do not have a proper system to prepare teen and adolescent girls regarding the onset of menstrual periods. Nearly 60 percent women feel schools lack adequate facilities for girls to change and dispose of sanitary pads off, says a survey.

Today is Menstrual Hygiene Day 2020 falling , and feminine hygiene brand Everteen had conducted the fifth edition of its annual Menstrual Hygiene Survey.

The survey was conducted among nearly 7000 Indian women participating from various cities of India including Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Chandigarh, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad and Kolkata.

Over 51 percent women respondents claimed that Indian schools do not have adequate systems to educate or mentally prepare teen and adolescent girls regarding the onset of menstrual periods. More than 95 percent women asserted that Indian school system should have some awareness programs to prepare girls on the subject. The survey also revealed that during adolescence, nearly 60 percent women did not have any prior knowledge about menstrual periods. In fact, as many as 38 percent women had first misinterpreted it as an injury or disease.

critical-days-Menstrual
Nearly 60 percent women did not have any prior knowledge about menstrual periods. Pixabay

In terms of infrastructure, almost 59 percent women felt that schools do not have adequate cleanliness of public toilets or facilities for girls to change and dispose sanitary pads off.

Chirag Pan, CEO, PAN Healthcare, says, “Menstrual hygiene and wellness have been known issues in the Indian context. While there has been progress in recent years, it is imperative that we leverage our strength in the Indian value-based systems and inculcate the importance of good menstrual hygiene from the onset of puberty itself. Schools can and must play a pivotal role in bringing this paradigm shift through classroom education, awareness programs and focused infrastructure development.”

In workspaces too, 41 percent women felt their office needed better cleanliness and facilities to change and dispose sanitary pads off in toilets.

The survey also suggests that the role that doctors can play in preventing gynecological problems is significantly downplayed due to the shame and guilt associated with menstrual cycles in Indian context. More than 50 percent women said they have had some gynecological infection or problem such as UTI, rashes, foul smell or itching during or after menstrual cycle in the past one year. Among these, 20 percent of women had such issues more than 3 times during the year. More than 64 percent women have faced irregularities in their period dates, out of which half have had to deal with it more than 3 times in a year. Ironically, only 37 percent of women said they consult a doctor in case or irregular periods, whereas 32 percent prefer to discuss it within the family and 30 percent just ignore it. Similarly, more than 54 percent women have had white discharge, but only 25 percent prefer to consult a doctor.

As many as 56 percent women believe that menstruation is still perceived as a taboo in Indian society. Not surprisingly, then, more than 42 percent of women felt uncomfortable buying sanitary essentials from a shop or a chemist, especially when there were several other customers. Because of the guilt associated with menstrual cycle, 87 percent women admitted that they had to hide or secretly take their sanitary product for changing. Interestingly, more than three-fourth of the respondents said that menstruation would not have been such a taboo subject in the society if men had it too!

Menstrual cup
87 percent women admitted that they had to hide or secretly take their sanitary product for changing. Pixabay

Also Read: Imperative For Heart failure Patients To Be Health Literate: Study

Another key revelation from the survey shows that 53 percent women have used a public toilet more than 3 times at an office, mall or cinema hall to change sanitary product. Hariom Tyagi, CEO, Wet and Dry Personal Care,says, “Our survey shows that 75 percent women feel uncomfortable having to use public toilets to change sanitary products. Yet, more than 93 percent women still use sanitary napkins. By switching to better, modern-age menstrual hygiene methods (MHM) such as menstrual cups, women can reduce the number of times they have to change their sanitary product in a day. Many women have told us that using menstrual cups has greatly reduced their daily discomfort due to periods.” The survey revealed that menstrual cups are now being used by 4 percent of the women, and their adoption has overtaken tampons by almost double.

One of the alarming trends that emerged from the survey shows that more than one-third women said they have used a pill or some other method to delay periods in case of an important occasion. (IANS)