Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×



By Archana Rao

What comes to your mind when one says ‘Dreadlocks?’ Bob Marley, Sadhus, marijuana, or chillum are the things that strike the mind instantaneously.

But there is more to it than what meets the eye. It took three years for French anthropologist Dr. Lina Ainouche to bring in and explain the history of dreadlocks and how the Jamaican Rastas and the Indian Sadhus share the unconventional fondness for this hairdo.

She spoke exclusively to NewsGram on her journey to make the documentary on Jamaican Rastas and the importance of dreadlocks.

Archana Rao: Linda, why did you choose to make a documentary on the life of Jamaican Rastas?

Dr. Linda: I have a few Rasta friends, and also having stayed in Jamaica for few years, I felt the need to tell the story of Rastafaris to the world. This is something that has never been shown. The Rasta movement began as slavery progressed in the early 20th century. Their culture was suppressed by brutal and stultifying European domination. Rastafari was an attempt to ensure the survival of African culture and an upfront anti-slavery, anti-colonial, and anti-imperialist struggle.

Archana Rao: So how did you come across this uncanny relation between India and Jamaica?

Dr. Linda: I stayed in India in 2001 and studied Jainism for a couple of years in the country. So I am familiar with the Indian culture. During the research process for my documentary, I discovered the roots of similarities between Rastas and Hindus. It goes as far as cuisines, way of life, spirituality, and even the dreadlocks. Indian Sadhus also wear their hair in dreadlocks.

If we look at the history of the two countries, the British colonists ruled in Jamaica until 1962 and in India until 1947. Indian workers were brought to the island from 1845 to 1917. Both Afro-Jamaicans and Indians were kidnapped and sent to work on sugar and banana plantations throughout Jamaica where they created positive relationships through their common oppressive hardships. This is when the two cultures came close to each other.


Archana Rao: How did dreadlocks became a part of the Rastafari movement?

Dr. Linda: During 1960’s, the Jamaican Rastas started wearing their hair in tangled locks and they grouped in a self-sustaining community near Kingston, the capital city popularly known as Pinnacle. The hairdo evolved as a way to express a more natural lifestyle and to go against the British establishment.

Archana Rao: So what does the documentary focus on?

Dr. Linda: I wanted to narrate the story of Rastafaris, their history, and the importance of dreadlocks in their cultures. The culture originated to stand tall as an anti-slavery and anti-suppressant movement.

Rastas were persecuted because of dreadlocks. It holds a great significance in their culture. Dreadlocks are a way of life, it is like a body art. It took us 3-4 years to complete the documentary. We did shooting in Jamaica, India, Paris, and New York with four different languages (French, Hindi, Jamaican Patois, and English) and four local crews.

Archana Rao: What all problems did you come across while shooting in India?

Dr. Linda: It wasn’t really tough shooting in India. People were more than happy to assist us with the shooting. The only problem we faced was the tough battle against mosquitoes.

Archana Rao: But dreadlocks are still considered a taboo in India, a style mostly carried by the Sadhus. It has not been widely accepted amongst the common crowd. Do you think this will change in near future?

Dr. Linda: In Jamaica, dreadlocks have become a common factor. Earlier Rastas were prosecuted due to dreadlocks by their own society. Now the scenario has completely changed. People have accepted it as a way of life. But I can’t say the same for India. Youngsters do sport dreadlocks but mundane beliefs still revolve around the hairstyle. The outlook of the society towards it needs to change. Maybe it will happen in another eight or ten years.

Archana Rao: So when are you planning to release the documentary in India?

Dr. Linda: We are in the phase of post-production of the documentary right now. We are trying to translate it in other languages such as Spanish and French. Maybe in 6-8 months we will release it in India as well.


Popular

Pexels

Narakasura's death is celebrated as 'Naraka Chaturdashi' popularly known as Choti Diwali

Diwali is arguably one of the most auspicious and celebrated holidays in South Asia. It is celebrated over the span of five days, where the third is considered most important and known as Diwali. During Diwali people come together to light, lamps, and diyas, savour sweet delicacies and pray to the lord. The day has various origin stories with the main them being the victory of good over evil. While the North celebrates the return of Lord Rama and Devi Sita to Ayodhya, the South rejoices in the victory of Lord Krishna and his consort Satyabhama over evil Narakasura.

Narakasura- The great mythical demon King

Naraka or Narakasur was the son of Bhudevi (Goddess Earth) and fathered either by the Varaha incarnation of Vishnu or Hiranyaksha. He grew to be a powerful demon king and became the legendary progenitor of all three dynasties of Pragjyotisha-Kamarupa, and the founding ruler of the legendary Bhauma dynasty of Pragjyotisha.

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia Commons

Safety-pins with charms

For all the great inventions that we have at hand, it is amazing how we keep going back to the safety pin every single time to fix everything. Be it tears in our clothes, to fix our broken things, to clean our teeth and nails when toothpicks are unavailable, to accessorize our clothes, and of course, as an integral part of the Indian saree. Safety pins are a must-have in our homes. But how did they come about at all?

The safety pin was invented at a time when brooches existed. They were used by the Greeks and Romans quite extensively. A man named Walter Hunt picked up a piece of brass and coiled it into the safety pin we know today. He did it just to pay off his debt. He even sold the patent rights of this seemingly insignificant invention just so that his debtors would leave him alone.

Keep Reading Show less
vaniensamayalarai

Sesame oil bath is also called ennai kuliyal in Tamil

In South India, Deepavali marks the end of the monsoon and heralds the start of winter. The festival is usually observed in the weeks following heavy rain, and just before the first cold spell in the peninsula. The light and laughter that comes with the almost week-long celebration are certainly warm to the bones, but there is still a tradition that the South Indians follow to ease their transition from humidity to the cold.

Just before the main festival, the family bathes in sesame oil. This tradition is called 'yellu yennai snaana' in Kannada, or 'ennai kuliyal' in Tamil, which translates to 'sesame oil bath'. The eldest member of the family applies three drops of heated oil on each member's head. They must massage this oil into their hair and body. The oil is allowed to soak in for a while, anywhere between twenty minutes to an hour. After this, they must wash with warm water before sunrise.

Keep reading... Show less