Friday April 26, 2019

Dreadlocks: Finding a connection between Rastas and Sadhus

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By Archana Rao

What comes to your mind when one says ‘Dreadlocks?’ Bob Marley, Sadhus, marijuana, or chillum are the things that strike the mind instantaneously.

But there is more to it than what meets the eye. It took three years for French anthropologist Dr. Lina Ainouche to bring in and explain the history of dreadlocks and how the Jamaican Rastas and the Indian Sadhus share the unconventional fondness for this hairdo.

She spoke exclusively to NewsGram on her journey to make the documentary on Jamaican Rastas and the importance of dreadlocks.

Archana Rao: Linda, why did you choose to make a documentary on the life of Jamaican Rastas?

Dr. Linda: I have a few Rasta friends, and also having stayed in Jamaica for few years, I felt the need to tell the story of Rastafaris to the world. This is something that has never been shown. The Rasta movement began as slavery progressed in the early 20th century. Their culture was suppressed by brutal and stultifying European domination. Rastafari was an attempt to ensure the survival of African culture and an upfront anti-slavery, anti-colonial, and anti-imperialist struggle.

Archana Rao: So how did you come across this uncanny relation between India and Jamaica?

Dr. Linda: I stayed in India in 2001 and studied Jainism for a couple of years in the country. So I am familiar with the Indian culture. During the research process for my documentary, I discovered the roots of similarities between Rastas and Hindus. It goes as far as cuisines, way of life, spirituality, and even the dreadlocks. Indian Sadhus also wear their hair in dreadlocks.

If we look at the history of the two countries, the British colonists ruled in Jamaica until 1962 and in India until 1947. Indian workers were brought to the island from 1845 to 1917. Both Afro-Jamaicans and Indians were kidnapped and sent to work on sugar and banana plantations throughout Jamaica where they created positive relationships through their common oppressive hardships. This is when the two cultures came close to each other.

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Archana Rao: How did dreadlocks became a part of the Rastafari movement?

Dr. Linda: During 1960’s, the Jamaican Rastas started wearing their hair in tangled locks and they grouped in a self-sustaining community near Kingston, the capital city popularly known as Pinnacle. The hairdo evolved as a way to express a more natural lifestyle and to go against the British establishment.

Archana Rao: So what does the documentary focus on?

Dr. Linda: I wanted to narrate the story of Rastafaris, their history, and the importance of dreadlocks in their cultures. The culture originated to stand tall as an anti-slavery and anti-suppressant movement.

Rastas were persecuted because of dreadlocks. It holds a great significance in their culture. Dreadlocks are a way of life, it is like a body art. It took us 3-4 years to complete the documentary. We did shooting in Jamaica, India, Paris, and New York with four different languages (French, Hindi, Jamaican Patois, and English) and four local crews.

Archana Rao: What all problems did you come across while shooting in India?

Dr. Linda: It wasn’t really tough shooting in India. People were more than happy to assist us with the shooting. The only problem we faced was the tough battle against mosquitoes.

Archana Rao: But dreadlocks are still considered a taboo in India, a style mostly carried by the Sadhus. It has not been widely accepted amongst the common crowd. Do you think this will change in near future?

Dr. Linda: In Jamaica, dreadlocks have become a common factor. Earlier Rastas were prosecuted due to dreadlocks by their own society. Now the scenario has completely changed. People have accepted it as a way of life. But I can’t say the same for India. Youngsters do sport dreadlocks but mundane beliefs still revolve around the hairstyle. The outlook of the society towards it needs to change. Maybe it will happen in another eight or ten years.

Archana Rao: So when are you planning to release the documentary in India?

Dr. Linda: We are in the phase of post-production of the documentary right now. We are trying to translate it in other languages such as Spanish and French. Maybe in 6-8 months we will release it in India as well.

Next Story

Hindu Icons Which Have Spiritual Significance

These icons have to be treated with extreme respect and should not be touched or removed without the owners consent.

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rangoli
Rangoli, Toran, Aum and Swastika – optional display inside or outside the home. Pixabay

Hindu Council of Australia has compiled a list of Hindu Icons that Hindus may wear on their body and which have spiritual significance. This list has been made to remove confusion among non-Hindus about what is sacred to Hindus.

Hindu Sacraments worn on the body

Hindu icons all year round

bangles
Bangles worn on wrists by women – a cultural item. Pixabay

Scared Hindu icons that can not be removed

  1. Nose stud – essential for girls during puberty, can not be removed for one year.
  2. Yajnopavit/Janaue – essential for boys after their Yajnopavit right of passage, once worn can not be removed and worn again without extensive rituals (not even during swimming lessons)
  3. Sindoor/Mangalsutra – essential for married women. Removal is not permitted while husband is alive.
  4. Choti/Shikha – small hair tail for boys during a right of passage.
  5. Pagdi (Turban, A cloth wrapped around the head) – touching or removing it is disrespectful. It can be removed for a short period in privacy, like when having a shower and must be worn as soon as possible.
  6. Sivalingam (Veera and Adi Shiva people, Lingayat) or other Hindu Gods as pendant in a necklace.

Sacred Hindu icons that can be removed by the wearer

  1. Bindi – optional for women and girls, it can not be removed by others.
  2. Bangles worn on wrists by women – a cultural item
  3. Kondhani – a bracelet made of black thread worn around the waist
  4. Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles
  5. Ear rings/studs for boys and girls in some families
  6. Gem stone on rings for special effects of planets
  7. Hindu Sacraments worn on Special Occasions

    Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles
    Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles. Pixabay
  1. Tulsi Mala – A necklace of Tulsi beads. During special religious observations.
  2. Teeka, Tilak, Vibhuti – essential during Hindu prayers, optional otherwise
  3. Mehendi/henna/turmeric – essential when getting married or when a close family member gets married, optional for married women during karva chauth day. Henna is a fast colour (looks like a emporary tatto) that takes a week or more to fade away
  4. Men are not allowed to cut their hair during Sabramalai month (Mid of November to January 14/15)
  5. Rakhi – a special bracelet worn on special festival day of Rakhi.
  6. Kajal/Surma (dark black eye ointment)
  7. Raksha/mouli – multi colour thread bracelet as a protective icon during special days
  8. Gajra – a flower arrangement by woman at the back of there hair.

Hindu icons in a Hindu home

These icons have to be treated with extreme respect and should not be touched or removed without the owners consent.

  1. Rangoli, Toran, Aum and Swastika – optional display inside or outside the home.
  2. Home shrine

(Originally Published: Hindu Council of Australia)