Monday October 22, 2018

Drinking Water Boosts Mental Skills in Elders Who Exercise

Drinking water may boost mental skills in exercising elderly

0
//
32
Drinking water boosts mental skills in exercising elderly.
Drinking water boosts mental skills in exercising elderly. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Older people who indulge in physical activity should increase their amount of water intake, to reap the full cognitive benefits of exercise, researchers suggest.

Dehydration has been shown to impair exercise performance and brain function in young people, but less is known about its impact on older populations.

The findings showed that hydration boosts performance on test of executive function that includes the skills needed to plan, focus, remember and multitask following exercise.

Exercise has been shown to improve intellectual health, including executive function.

“Middle-age and older adults often display a blunted thirst perception, which places them at risk for dehydration and subsequently may reduce the cognitive health-related benefits of exercise,” said researchers including Brandon Yates, of Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, US.

An elderly woman exercising.
An elderly woman exercising. Pixabay

The study, presented at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego, explored the association between hydration status before exercising and exercise-enhanced cognition in older adults.

The team recruited recreational cyclists (average age 55) who participated in a large cycling event on a warm day (78-86 degrees F).

The cyclists performed a “trail-making” executive function test–quickly and accurately connecting numbered dots using paper and pencil — before and after the event.

Also Read: Why is water fasting NOT a good idea for weight loss?

The team tested the volunteers’ urine before they exercised and divided them into two groups — normal hydration and dehydrated — based on their hydration status.

The normal hydration group showed noticeable improvement in the completion time of the trail-making test after cycling when compared to their pre-cycling test.

The dehydration group also completed their post-cycling test more quickly, but the time reduction was not significant.

“This suggests that older adults should adopt adequate drinking behaviours to reduce cognitive fatigue and potentially enhance the cognitive benefits of regular exercise participation,” the researchers said.  IANS

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Lack of Proper Sleep May Lead To Impairment of Mental Skills: Study

Even a single night's sleep can affect a person's ability to think.

0
impairment
Sleeping too much can affect your mental skills: Study Pixabay

While lack of proper sleep has been known to affect health, a new study has showed that people who sleep less or more than an average of seven to eight hours per night are more likely to develop impairment in their mental skills.

The findings showed that this effected adults equally.

The amount of sleep associated with highly functional cognitive behaviour was the same for everyone (seven to eight hours), regardless of age.

Also, the impairment associated with too little or too much sleep did not depend on the age of the participants, the researchers said.

“We found that the optimum amount of sleep to keep your brain performing its best is seven to eight hours every night and that corresponds to what the doctors will tell you need to keep your body in tip-top shape, as well,” said lead author Conor Wild, Research Associate at the University of Western Ontario in Canada.

sleeping, impairment
The average age of participants was 46 years and 63 per cent were men.
Pixabay

“We also found that people that slept more than that amount were equally impaired as those who slept too little,” Wild added.

For the study, published in the journal SLEEP, the team examined more than 40,000 participants.

Nearly half of all participants reported typically sleeping less than 6.3 hours per night, about an hour less than the study’s recommended amount.

Most participants who slept four hours or less performed as if they were almost nine years older.

Also Read: Losing Just 6 Hours of Sleep May Spike Up Diabetes Risk: Study

Importantly, the participants’ reasoning and verbal abilities were two of the actions most strongly affected by sleep while short-term memory performance was relatively unaffected.

On the other hand, even a single night’s sleep can affect a person’s ability to think. Participants who slept more than usual the night before participating in the study performed better than those who slept their usual amount or less, the researchers said. (IANS)