Wednesday November 13, 2019

Drinking Wine Weekly May Improve Pregnancy Chances, says Study

The study conducted by researchers at Washington University in the US, claimed that women who are trying to conceive may have better chance at it, if they happen to drink red wine once every week.

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Drinking Wine
Drinking Wine may improve the chances of pregnancy. Pixabay.
  • It was found that women who consumed wine, especially red wine, for more than five times in a month had a high ovarian reserve which depicts a woman’s reproductive health.
  • The study also stated that drinking wine would help only in improving the ovarian reserve and had no connection with a fertility of pregnant or potential conceiving women.
  • Red wine contains resveratrol which acts as an antioxidant protecting cell against biological stress and is a rich source of blueberries, red grapes and cocoa.

A study in the US, as reported by PTI, stated that women who are looking forward to conceive may have their chances increased by drinking wine once every week.

As a part of the study conducted by Washington University in the US, 135 women with age range of 18 to 44 years, were taken into consideration for a month for analysing the impact of drinking wine -red or white, beer and spirits. Ultrasound scanners were used to count each woman’s antral follicles for the month.

Drinking wine
Ovarian Reserve in women increases by drinking wine once a week. Pixabay.

-Prepared by Bhavana Rathi of NewsGram. Twitter @tweet_bhavana

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Impaired Liver Function During Pregnancy Leads To Obese Kids

Impaired liver function during pregnancy increases the risks of obesity in kids

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Pregnancy
Impaired liver function during pregnancy may increase the risk of obesity in children. PIxabay

Impaired liver function during pregnancy may alter gut bacteria composition and increase the risk of obesity in children, according to a new study.

In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired, particularly when they were fed a Western-style, high-fat diet.

“These findings further suggest that health during pregnancy can have long-term effects on children. In this case they suggest that gut microbiome alterations, may increase the risk of obesity in children, when fed a western style, high-fat diet, ” said study researcher Caroline Ovadia from King’s College London.

The most common liver disease in pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis (ICP), reduces the release of digestive fluid bile from the liver causing bile acids to build up in the blood, impairing liver function. This causes severe itching in the mother and increases risks of stillbirth and preterm birth for the baby.

pregnancy
In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired. Pixabay

Previous studies suggest that children of women with ICP are more likely to develop childhood obesity.

For the findings, the research team investigated how gut microbiota are affected in the offspring of a mouse model of ICP.

The results reported that the offspring had a different gut microbiome composition and liver function, particularly when fed a high-fat diet, which could contribute to impaired metabolism and increase risk of obesity.

The results suggest that mice born to mothers with ICP, or other liver diseases, may benefit from maintaining a healthy diet and should avoid fatty foods.

These findings also suggest that targeting microbiome composition with treatment strategies in pregnant women, such as using pre-biotics or pro-biotics, could help prevent the risk of child obesity.

Also Read- Parents With Only Child More Likely To Tackle Obese Kids

“Understanding changes in composition of the gut microbiome and their effects may provide new ways of diagnosing patients at particular risk of obesity before it occurs. We could then develop personalised medicine and target appropriate treatments to alter gut bacteria accordingly,” Ovadia added.

The study was presented at The Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference in the UK. (IANS)