Monday January 27, 2020

Common Drug Form Effective in Treating Children With Anxiety Disorder

The findings confirm the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's recommendations that SSRIs should be considered as the first-line of medication treatment for anxiety in youth, Strawn noted

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Probiotics Not Effective in Reducing Anxiety: Study
Anxiety linked to kicking, yelling during sleep as well. Pixabay

Researchers have found that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are very effective in treating children and adolescents with paediatric anxiety disorder.

They reached the conclusion after examining common medications prescribed for children and adolescents with anxiety disorders.

SSRIs are the most commonly prescribed anti-depressants, which can ease symptoms of moderate to severe depression and cause fewer side effects compared with other anti-depressants.

Symptoms of anxiety include recurring fears, aversions to social situations as well as being unable to control worries. It could manifest into troubled sleep, difficulty in concentrating, and heart and digestive issues.

According to the American Academy of Paediatrics (AAP), anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental health disorder in children.

“Clinicians have limited data to help them select from among the evidence-based treatments for patients with anxiety. This meta-analysis provides guidance in terms of medication-specific differences in efficacy and tolerability among medications, commonly used to treat pediatric patients with anxiety disorders,” said Jeffrey Strawn, Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati in the US.

Victimization in early school days leads to anxiety. Pixabay
Victimization in early school days can also leads to anxiety. Pixabay

“Our study synthesises evidences from multiple trials to guide clinicians and patients in deciding which medication to go for while treating children and adolescents with anxiety disorders,” said Eric Dobson, psychiatry resident at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

For the study, researchers studied 2,623 patients, aged 11 and a half years on average. Patients with social anxiety disorders with moderate severity were randomly assigned to receive medication or placebo and had .

The results, published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, showed among anxious youth treatment response was more effective with SSRIs than with serotonin-norepineprhine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs).

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While SSRIs were the most tolerable class of medication, tricyclic antidepressants were the least tolerable, findings revealed.

“This comprehensive evaluation comparing efficacy and tolerability of treatments in pediatric anxiety disorders suggests that SSRIs are superior to SNRIs and all other classes of medications,” said Dobson.

The findings confirm the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s recommendations that SSRIs should be considered as the first-line of medication treatment for anxiety in youth, Strawn noted. (IANS)

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Children of Mothers With Diabetes Are Likely To Suffer From Heart Diseases, Says Study

The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes

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Diabetes
Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified in the Study. Pixabay

Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned.

The increased rates were more pronounced among children of mothers with a history of CVD or diabetic complications, said the study published in the journal The BMJ.

“Our study provides evidence that children of mothers with diabetes, especially those with a history of CVD or with diabetic complications, had increased rates of early onset CVD throughout the early decades of life,” said study researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark.

If this association is shown to be causal, preventing, screening, and treating diabetes in women of childbearing age could be important not only for improving the health of the women but also for reducing long term risks of CVD in their offspring, the researchers added

The number of women diagnosed with diabetes before or during pregnancy has increased globally, and children of these women are more likely to have risk factors for future CVD, such as high blood pressure and high blood sugar levels. It is unclear, however, whether or to what extent exposure to diabetes in the womb increases the risk of developing CVD in offspring over a lifetime.

So an international team of researchers set out to evaluate associations between diabetes diagnosed before or during pregnancy and early onset CVD in children during their first four decades of life. They base their findings on national registry data for over 2.4 million children born without congenital heart disease in Denmark from 1977 to 2016.

Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified.

Diabetes
Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned. Pixabay

Other potentially influential factors, such as mother’s age, education, lifestyle and medical history were also taken into account. During up to 40 years of follow-up, children of mothers with diabetes had a 29 per cent increased overall rate of early onset CVD compared with children of mothers who did not have diabetes (cumulative risks: 17.8 per cent vs 13.1 per cent ).

The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes, particularly heart failure (45 per cent), hypertensive disease (78 per cent), deep vein thrombosis (82 per cent), and pulmonary embolism (91 per cent).

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Increased rates were seen in each age group in childhood (before 20 years of age) and early adulthood (from 20 to 40 years of age), regardless of the type of diabetes they were exposed to (pregestational or gestational) and rates were similar for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the study said. (IANS)