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DSLR Cameras More Vulnerable to Malware Attacks, Suggest Researchers

To avoid attacks, camera owners should make sure your camera is using the latest firmware version, and install a patch if available, Check Point recommended

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Nikon
DSLR cameras vulnerable to malware attacks: Researchers. Pixabay

It is not just your phone or computer that are vulnerable to hacking. Security researchers have now warned that even DSLR cameras are not immune to ransomware and malware attacks.

Through the USB and connections to Wi-Fi networks, threat actors can take control of data on modern cameras, found the researchers from cybersecurity firm Check Point Software Technologies.

“Any ‘smart’ device, including the DSLR camera, is susceptible to attacks,” said Eyal Itkin, Security Researcher, Check Point Software Technologies.

“Cameras are no longer just connected to the USB, but to the WiFi network and its surrounding environment. This makes them more vulnerable to threats as attackers can inject ransomware into both the camera and PC it is connected to,” Itkin added.

Once the camera is attacked, the photos could end up being held hostage until the user pays the ransom for them to be released.

Since modern cameras no longer use film to capture and reproduce images, the International Imaging Industry Association devised a standardised protocol known as Picture Transfer Protocol (PTP) to transfer digital images from camera to PC.

fujifilm
The camera offers fast and silent continuous shooting of up to 30 fps in a cropped frame equivalent to 16.6MP. (Representational image). Wikimedia Commons

Initially focused on image transfer, this protocol has evolved to include dozens of different commands that support anything from taking a live picture to upgrading the camera’s firmware.

Check Point Research, the threat intelligence arm of Check Point Software Technologies, aimed to access the cameras and exploit vulnerabilities in the protocol to infect the camera.

For the research, Check Point used Canon’s EOS 80D DSLR camera which supports both USB and Wi-Fi, and critical vulnerabilities in the Picture Transfer Protocol were found.

Check Point Research informed Canon about the vulnerabilities and the companies worked together to patch them. Canon published the patch as part of an official security advisory.

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Given that the protocol is standardised and embedded in other camera brands, the researchers believe similar vulnerabilities can be found in cameras from other vendors as well.

To avoid attacks, camera owners should make sure your camera is using the latest firmware version, and install a patch if available, Check Point recommended.

They should also turn off the camera’s Wi-Fi when not in use. (IANS)

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66% Indian Business Decision Makers Concerned About Cyber Threats

In line with this approach, 79 per cent of Indian business decision makers would want to adopt deeply-integrated or synchronised security solutions that could detect, investigate and respond to cyber threats

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Cyber Threats
Cyber security is a shared responsibility. While IT teams must be proactive in their response to Cyber Threats, knowledgeable employees and leadership teams pave the way for organisations to better detect, protect and respond. Pixabay

Sixty-six per cent of business decision makers in India believe lack of security expertise is a challenge for their organisations, while 63 per cent of Indian businesses are concerned about being exposed to Cyber Threats due to employee errors, according to a new report.

“As the threat landscape evolves, businesses too need to advance their defence mechanisms with synchronised security solutions that are designed to strengthen their cyber security posture,” Sunil Sharma, Managing Director, Sales, Sophos India and SAARC, said in a statement.

The success of an organisation’s cyber security investment lies not just in buying technology, but corporate culture, employee education and path-to-purchase also play critical roles, according to the Future of Cybersecurity in Asia Pacific and Japan-Culture, Efficiency, Awareness report.

“Cyber security is a shared responsibility. While IT teams must be proactive in their response to Cyber Threats, knowledgeable employees and leadership teams pave the way for organisations to better detect, protect and respond,” Sharma said.

Cyber Threats
Sixty-six per cent of business decision makers in India believe lack of security expertise is a challenge for their organisations, while 63 per cent of Indian businesses are concerned about being exposed to Cyber Threats due to employee errors. Pixabay

Only 19 per cent of Indian organisations regularly make significant changes to their cyber security approach, and 38 per cent intend to make changes to security approach in the next 6-24 months.

In line with this approach, 79 per cent of Indian business decision makers would want to adopt deeply-integrated or synchronised security solutions that could detect, investigate and respond to cyber threats, it added.

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According to global cyber security major Sophos, main triggers for security updates — beyond changes to overall security posture — are technology and product developments, compliance and regulation requirements, and growing awareness of new attacks. (IANS)