Monday October 14, 2019

Over 60% E-cigarette Smokers Want to Quit: Study

Several users say they used e-cigarettes in an attempt to quit traditional cigarettes

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E-cigarettes, Smokers
A woman smokes an electronic cigarette in London, Aug. 19, 2015. VOA

Over 60 per cent e-cigarette users want to quit smoking and over 25 per cent smokers have already tried to stop using the electronic device, says a new study.

In the study, published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, the researchers observed that most smokers don’t want to use e-cigarettes forever and wish to stop using it exactly the same way a traditional smoker tries to quit smoking.

“Most of the discussion about e-cigarettes has focused on the relative harm as compared to traditional cigarettes, the efficacy of e-cigarettes as a cessation device, and the alarming increase of their use in children,” said study co-author Marc Steinberg, Associate Professor at Rutgers University, US.

“Our data suggests that e-cigarette users do not want to use these devices forever. Eventually, they want to stop using e-cigarettes the same way a traditional smoker wants to quit smoking cigarettes,” Steinberg added.

The study highlighted that the smokers tried several strategies including medications, counselling and social support to stop using e-cigarettes.

nicotine, e-cigarettes
FILE – A customer exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at a store in New York, Feb. 20, 2014. VOA

“The strategies that people reported using to quit e-cigarettes include many of the strategies we recommend for quitting traditional cigarettes such as FDA-approved nicotine replacement products or medications, counselling and social support,” said study author Rachel Rosen, a student at the University.

“While e-cigarettes may be associated with reduced harm as compared to combustible cigarettes, they also are potentially addicting and the e-cigarette aerosol still contains toxic substances,” she said.

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As e-cigarette use continues to increase and as more e-cigarette users want to quit, the researchers believe that it will be necessary “to be ready to help those who may have difficulty stopping on their own”.

About 10 million US adults smoke e-cigarettes. Most of them smoke traditional cigarettes too. Several users say they used e-cigarettes in an attempt to quit traditional cigarettes. (IANS)

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Smokers Who Quit Do Not Generally Turn their Gaze Towards Mouth-Watering Food as Normally Thought

The results suggest that smoking abstinence does not affect the motivation for food and water

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Smokers, Quit, Food
We found that the motivations for cigarettes, food and water do not interact very much. Pixabay

Smokers who quit or abstain for whatever reason do not generally turn their gaze towards mouth-watering food as normally thought. According to researchers from University at Buffalo, smoking abstinence doesn’t greatly affect the motivation for food.

“We found that the motivations for cigarettes, food and water do not interact very much,” said Stephen Tiffany from the university’s department of psychology.

“The results suggest that smoking abstinence does not affect the motivation for food and water”.

The study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, used cues and actual money to learn how much smokers might spend for cigarettes, food and water during abstinence.

Smokers, Quit, Food
Smokers who quit or abstain for whatever reason do not generally turn their gaze towards mouth-watering food as normally thought. Pixabay

The results provide new insights for how different systems control motivation and reward.

Food does not become more appealing during those times when a smoker is in a smoke-free environment or otherwise can’t smoke.

“If you’re on an airplane and can’t smoke, you’re not likely to be spending more money than usual on snacks,” said Tiffany.

For the current study, 50 participants, all smokers who had abstained for 12 hours, had money to spend on their choices.

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Tiffany and Jennifer Betts, the study’s co-author, sat those participants in front of a box with a sliding door.

Inside the box was one of three items: their favourite brand of cigarette, a candy bar they previously acknowledged as liking, or a cup of water.

During the study, non-abstinent smokers spent more money for cigarettes than for food. And more money for food than for water.

Abstinent smokers spent even more for cigarettes, but they didn’t spend for food or for water.

Smokers, Quit, Food
According to researchers from University at Buffalo, smoking abstinence doesn’t greatly affect the motivation for food. Pixabay

“When people are abstinent from cigarettes their craving tends to go up, but they don’t become hypersensitive to the cue,” said Tiffany.

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People don’t relapse randomly. They relapse in the presence of opportunities to use which can be triggered by cues, the researchers noted. (IANS)