Friday June 21, 2019

Over 60% E-cigarette Smokers Want to Quit: Study

Several users say they used e-cigarettes in an attempt to quit traditional cigarettes

0
//
E-cigarettes, Smokers
A woman smokes an electronic cigarette in London, Aug. 19, 2015. VOA

Over 60 per cent e-cigarette users want to quit smoking and over 25 per cent smokers have already tried to stop using the electronic device, says a new study.

In the study, published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, the researchers observed that most smokers don’t want to use e-cigarettes forever and wish to stop using it exactly the same way a traditional smoker tries to quit smoking.

“Most of the discussion about e-cigarettes has focused on the relative harm as compared to traditional cigarettes, the efficacy of e-cigarettes as a cessation device, and the alarming increase of their use in children,” said study co-author Marc Steinberg, Associate Professor at Rutgers University, US.

“Our data suggests that e-cigarette users do not want to use these devices forever. Eventually, they want to stop using e-cigarettes the same way a traditional smoker wants to quit smoking cigarettes,” Steinberg added.

The study highlighted that the smokers tried several strategies including medications, counselling and social support to stop using e-cigarettes.

nicotine, e-cigarettes
FILE – A customer exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at a store in New York, Feb. 20, 2014. VOA

“The strategies that people reported using to quit e-cigarettes include many of the strategies we recommend for quitting traditional cigarettes such as FDA-approved nicotine replacement products or medications, counselling and social support,” said study author Rachel Rosen, a student at the University.

“While e-cigarettes may be associated with reduced harm as compared to combustible cigarettes, they also are potentially addicting and the e-cigarette aerosol still contains toxic substances,” she said.

Also Read- Air Pollution Raises Anxiety, Depression Risks in Kids, Says Study

As e-cigarette use continues to increase and as more e-cigarette users want to quit, the researchers believe that it will be necessary “to be ready to help those who may have difficulty stopping on their own”.

About 10 million US adults smoke e-cigarettes. Most of them smoke traditional cigarettes too. Several users say they used e-cigarettes in an attempt to quit traditional cigarettes. (IANS)

Next Story

Nicotine Present in E-cigarette Increases Risk of Chronic Bronchitis, Says Study

The researchers concluded that nicotine produced these negative effects by stimulating the ion channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1)

0
E-cigarettes
E-cigarettes is considered to be safer than tobacco cigarettes. Pixabay

E-cigarette vaping with nicotine not only hampers mucus clearance from the airways, but also increases the risk of chronic bronchitis, warn researchers.

A single session of vaping can deliver more nicotine in the airways than smoking one cigarette, warned researchers in a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

“The question was whether vape containing nicotine had negative effects on the ability to clear secretions from the airways similar to tobacco smoke,” said Matthias Salathe, senior author of the study and Professor at the University of Kansas.

The study’s findings showed that vaping with nicotine impaired ciliary beat frequency, dehydrates airway fluid and made mucus more viscous or sticky.

These changes make it more difficult for the bronchi, the main passageways to the lung, to defend themselves from infection and injury.

FILE – A smoker exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at the Vapor Spot, in Sacramento, California, in this July 7, 2015, photo. VOA

“Vaping with nicotine is not harmless as commonly assumed by those who start vaping. At the very least, it increases the risk of chronic bronchitis,” Salathe said.

The researchers observed that exposing human airway cells to e-cigarette vapour containing nicotine resulted in a decreased ability to move mucus or phlegm across the surface. This phenomenon is called “mucociliary dysfunction.”

Mucociliary dysfunction is a feature of many lung diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis.

Also Read- Chinese Smartphone Giant Huawei Signs a 5G Development Deal with Russia’s Biggest Carrier

For the study, the researchers tested the effects of nicotine-containing e-cigarette vapours on airway mucociliary function in differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) and sheep, whose airways mimic those of humans when exposed to e-cigarette vapour.

The researchers concluded that nicotine produced these negative effects by stimulating the ion channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1). Blocking TRPA1 reduced the effects of nicotine on clearance in both human cells in culture and in the sheep. (IANS)