Sunday February 17, 2019

E-cigarettes May Not Stain Teeth, says Study

Conversely, exposure to vapour from the e-cigarettes or tobacco heating products resulted in little or no colour change that was comparable to the untreated controls

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Vaping, teeth,e-cigarette, cigarettes
Nicotine vaping on rise among US teenagers: Survey. Pixabay

E-cigarettes and tobacco heating products cause significantly less staining to teeth than conventional cigarettes, a new study has found.

While cigarette smoke caused significant enamel discolouration, vapour from the e-cigarettes and aerosol from the tobacco heating products caused only minimal staining.

These next generation products do not involve combustion; the vapour and aerosol they produce are less complex and contain significantly lower levels of certain toxicants compared to cigarette smoke.

“Many studies have postulated that it is the tar in cigarette smoke that stains teeth,” said Annette Dalrymple, senior scientist at British American Tobacco in the UK.

“The study clearly shows that the e-cigarettes and tobacco heating products assessed caused minimal discolouration — very promising for consumers. However, further studies are required to understand the long-term effect on teeth staining and oral health when smokers switch to using next generation products,” Dalrymple added.

e-cigarettes
In this April 11, 2018, photo, an unidentified 15-year-old high school student uses a vaping device near the school’s campus in Cambridge, Mass. Health and education officials across the country are raising alarms over wide underage use of e-cigarettes and other vaping products. The devices heat liquid into an inhalable vapor that’s sold in sugary flavors like mango and mint — and often with the addictive drug nicotine. VOA

For the study, published in the journal American Journal of Dentistry, the team assessed and compared an e-cigarette, a tobacco heating product and a conventional cigarette for their impact on teeth enamel staining.

They assessed in the laboratory the level of enamel discoloration by cigarette smoke and vapour from e-cigarettes and tobacco heating products.

Tests were carried out on enamel blocks cut from bovine incisors — substitute for human teeth in dental research.

The enamel blocks were exposed to the particulate matter (isolated from the smoke/vapour) for 14 days and then whole smoke/vapour for five days.

e-Cigarette
e-Cigarette, Pixabay

The enamel samples were assessed before, during and after treatment and colour readings were determined using an established method involving spectrophotometer and trained scientists.

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Discolouration of enamel blocks exposed to cigarette smoke was apparent in as little as one day and continued to increase as the concentration of cigarette smoke increased, the findings revealed.

Conversely, exposure to vapour from the e-cigarettes or tobacco heating products resulted in little or no colour change that was comparable to the untreated controls. (IANS)

Next Story

New Device Equally Harmful as E-cigarettes

"If the current trend continues, tobacco use will cause more than eight million deaths annually by 2030 around the world," noted Sharma

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E-cigarettes, Smokers
Talia Eisenberg, co-founder of the Henley Vaporium, uses her vaping device in New York, Feb. 20, 2014. VOA

While we know about the harmful effects of traditional cigarettes and vaping, new heated tobacco devices are no less toxic to the human lung cells than ordinary cigarette smoke, said researchers, including one of Indian-origin.

The study has compared new heated tobacco devices, which heat solid tobacco instead of an e-liquid, with vaping and traditional cigarettes showing that all the three are toxic to the cells.

In addition, these newer electronic nicotine delivery devices can destroy lung tissue leading to fatal diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer and pneumonia, and can increase the risk of developing asthma.

“Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death, and with the introduction of e-cigarettes in the last decade, the trend of nicotine uptake is not going to slow down in the near future,” said Pawan Sharma, a researcher at the University of Technology Sydney.

“The latest addition in this emerging trend is the planned and vigorous introduction of heated tobacco devices. They are commonly called next generation or heat-not-burn products. We know very little about the health effects of these new devices, so we designed this research to compare them with cigarette smoking and vaping,” added Sharma.

For the study, researchers tested the effects of all three nicotine sources on two types of cells taken from the human airways: epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells.

E-cigarettes, Smokers
A woman smokes an electronic cigarette in London, Aug. 19, 2015. VOA

In healthy lungs, epithelial cells act as the first line of defence to any foreign particles entering the airway while smooth muscle cells maintain the structure of the airway. However, smoking can lead to difficulty in breathing primarily by hampering the normal functions of these cells.

The team exposed the cells to different concentrations of cigarette smoke, e-cigarette vapour and vapour from a heated tobacco device, and measured whether this was damaging to cells and whether it affected the cells’ normal functions.

The findings, published in ERJ Open Research, showed that cigarette smoke and heated tobacco vapour were highly toxic to the cells both at lower and higher concentrations while e-cigarette vapour demonstrated toxicity mainly at higher concentrations.

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Importantly, the review of the European Respiratory Society’s Tobacco Control Committee’s own data on these devices has shown that, in rats, there is evidence of lung inflammation, and there is no evidence of improvement in lung inflammation and function in smokers who switch to heated tobacco, said Professor Charlotta Pisinger from the varsity.

“If the current trend continues, tobacco use will cause more than eight million deaths annually by 2030 around the world,” noted Sharma. (IANS)