Tuesday September 17, 2019
Home Lead Story E-Gloves For ...

E-Gloves For Prosthetic Hand Users Provides Human-Like Touch

Researchers have developed an electronic glove or e-glove that can be worn over a prosthetic hand to provide human-like softness, warmth, appearance and more

0
//
prosthetic, e-gloves, science
Prosthetic technician Wilfrid Macena works in a workshop at the St. Vincent's Center, an institution run by Haiti's Episcopal Church in downtown Port-au-Prince, June 4, 2019. VOA

Researchers have developed an electronic glove or e-gloves that can be worn over a prosthetic hand to provide human-like softness, warmth, appearance and sensory perception, such as the ability to sense pressure, temperature and hydration.

The e-glove uses thin, flexible electronic sensors and miniaturized silicon-based circuit chips on the commercially available nitrile glove.

The e-glove is connected to a specially designed wristwatch, allowing for real-time display of sensory data and remote transmission to the user for post-data processing, said the team from Purdue University.

“We developed a novel concept of the soft-packaged, sensor-instrumented e-glove built on a commercial nitrile glove, allowing it to seamlessly fit on arbitrary hand shapes,” said Chi Hwan Lee, Assistant Professor in Purdue’s College of Engineering.

prosthetic, e-glove, science
An employee shows a 3D-printed prosthetic hand, created at the FabLab in city of Irbid, Jordan, Feb. 26, 2019. VOA

The e-glove is configured with a stretchable form of multimodal sensors to collect various information such as pressure, temperature, humidity and electrophysiological biosignals, while simultaneously providing realistic human hand-like softness, appearance and even warmth.

Lee and his team hope that the appearance and capabilities of the e-glove will improve the well-being of prosthetic hand users by allowing them to feel more comfortable in social contexts.

ALSO READ: Software Giant Microsoft Buys Cloud Migration Start-up Movere: Report

The glove is available in different skin tone colors, has lifelike fingerprints and artificial fingernails.

“The prospective end user could be any prosthetic hand users who have felt uncomfortable wearing current prosthetic hands, especially in many social contexts,” Lee added in a paper published in the journal NPG Asia Materials.

The team is also seeking partners to collaborate in clinical trials or experts in the prosthetics field to validate the use of the e-glove and to continue optimizing the design of the glove. (IANS)

Next Story

Gas-Capturing Capsules To Measure What Gases You Have In Your Stomach

Gas-capturing capsule that can measure what kind of gases you have in your stomach and alert you if there is any problem

0
Gas, Capsule, Science, Medical
Gas-capturing capsule that can measure what kind of gases you have in your stomach and alert you if there is any problem. Pixabay

Rather than laughing about it or feeling embarrassed, this is the time to take flatulence seriously as researchers have developed a non-invasive, gas-capturing capsule that can measure what kind of gases you have in your stomach and alert you if there is any problem.

The capsule can detect gaseous biomarkers as it passes through the gut, all the while transmitting the captured data wirelessly to the Cloud for aggregation and analysis.

The purpose of the research is to lift the lid on the various gases of the gut and show how vital they are for human health, said the team from University of New South Wale in Australia (UNSW).

“Interestingly, the gases in most abundance throughout the digestive system — nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and even methane – are odourless,” said lead author and Professor Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh.

The study, published in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, examined all available literature on gastrointestinal gases, their interactions with the microbiome of the gut, their associated disorders and the way that they can be measured and analysed.

Gas, Capsule, Science, Medical
An illustration of stomach pain, that mostly persists because of gas, today. Wikimedia Commons

The researchers examined each of the main gases that are found in the gastrointestinal system.

With the exception of nitrogen, the gases found in the intestines have also been linked with various gut diseases including malabsorption of food, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and even colon cancer, especially when the gas profiles deviate from the norm.

The research team is commercialising a revolutionary tool to analyse the gastrointestinal gases in vivo (within the body) in the form of an ingestible capsule loaded with gas-sensing technology.

Traditionally, testing and measuring of the various gases has ranged from the non-invasive in vitro– in the laboratory — gut simulators and indirect breath testing through to colonic or small intestine tube-insertion, a much more invasive method used to capture stool or gas samples.

ALSO READ: Himachal Pradesh To Buy-Back Non-Recyclable Plastic Waste

The ingestible capsule can simultaneously detect oxygen and hydrogen concentrations as it moves through the gastrointestinal gut and wirelessly transmit the data to an external receiver.

“There is no other tool that can do what this capsule does,” said Kalantar-Zadeh.

“In our early trials, the capsule has accurately shown the onset of food-related fermentation in the gut, which would be immensely valuable for clinical studies of food digestion and normal gut function,” he added.

According to the researchers, a trial is currently underway by Atmo Biosciences to test the commercial version of the capsule, the results of which will be detailed in a future research paper. (IANS)