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Early Home Learning Improves Kid’s Grades, Says Study

According to the researchers, the effect also worked the other way with the quality of parent-child interaction regarding mathematics also improving children’s language skills

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The positive effects of a rich home learning environment during a child’s early years continue into adolescence and help improve test scores later in life, says a study.

Published in School Effectiveness and School Improvement, the research shows pre-schoolers whose parents regularly read and talked about books with them scored better on math tests at age 12.

“Our results underline the great importance of exposing children to books for development not just in literacy but numeracy too: early language skills not only improve a child’s reading but also boost mathematical ability,” said the study lead author Simone Lehrl from University of Bamberg.

For the findings, researchers studied 229 German children from age three until secondary school and participants’ literacy and numeracy skills were tested annually in their three years of preschool (ages 3-5) and again when they were 12 or 13 years old.

The report also found that while more young people tend to read on digital devices or via the internet, fewer read paper books. Pixabay

They found that children gained from home stimulation in their preschool years in literacy, language and arithmetic skills which, in turn, led to higher outcomes in reading and mathematical skills in secondary school, regardless of the home learning environment then.

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“Encouraging caregivers to engage with their children in direct literacy activities, shared book reading and advanced verbal interactions during reading and to include language and mathematical content during these activities, should promote children’s reading and mathematical abilities in secondary school. Such experiences lay a strong foundation for later school success,” Lehrl said.

According to the researchers, the effect also worked the other way with the quality of parent-child interaction regarding mathematics also improving children’s language skills. (IANS)

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Eat Your Breakfast To Score Good Marks

Study says that kids who rarely eat their breakfast are likely to get bad grades

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Breakfast for good grades
Kids should eat their breakfast to get good grades. Pixabay

Parents, take a note. If you want your kids to score good marks, make sure they had their breakfast, as researchers have found that students who rarely ate breakfast on school days achieved lower grades than those who ate it frequently.

Adding together all of a student’s exam results, they found that students who said they rarely ate breakfast achieved nearly two grades lower than those who rarely missed their morning meal.

For the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health, researchers from the University of Leeds demonstrated a link between eating breakfast and GCSE performance for secondary school students in the UK.

“Our study suggests that secondary school students are at a disadvantage if they are not getting a morning meal to fuel their brains for the start of the school day,” said study lead researcher Katie Adolphus from the University of Leeds in UK.

“This research suggests that poor nutrition is associated with worse results at school,” Adolphus said.

breakfast
There is a link between eating breakfast and academic performance. Pixabay

For the findings, the researchers surveyed 294 students from schools and colleges in West Yorkshire in 2011, and found that 29 per cent rarely or never ate breakfast on school days, while 18 per cent ate breakfast occasionally, and 53 per cent frequently.

Their figures are similar to the latest national data for England in 2019, which found that more than 16 per cent of secondary school children miss breakfast.

GCSE grades were converted to point scores using the Department for Education’s 2012 system, where A* = 58, A = 52, B = 46, and so on.

Adding up students’ scores across all subjects gave students an aggregated score.

Those who rarely ate breakfast scored on average 10.25 points lower than those who frequently ate breakfast, a difference of nearly two grades, after accounting for other important factors including socio-economic status, ethnicity, age, sex and BMI.

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Looking at performance for each individual GCSE, they found that students who rarely ate breakfast scored on average 1.20 points lower than those who frequently ate breakfast, after accounting for other factors.

Each grade equates to six points, so the difference accounted for a drop of a fifth of a grade for every GCSE an individual achieved, the study said. (IANS)