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How to make your lipstick last longer.Pixabay
  • Choose your lipstick wisely through quick test steps to make your lipstick last longer.
  • Things to keep in mind while applying lipstick.

5 Easy tricks to make your lipstick last longer

Many women avoid wearing lipstick because it keeps on getting fade or smudge.The major reason behind your lipstick coming off is ‘Eating’. You have to keep a check on your lipstick when you are out with family which becomes difficult and irritating.


Some common lipstick shades.Pixabay


Here are 5 easy tricks which can make your lipstick last longer –

Scrub your lips to remove dead skin: Removing the dead skin on your lips gives your lipstick a fresh palette to adhere to. You can use a homemade scrub made of basic household ingredients or readymade scrubs can also be used.

Use of lip liner: It protects your lipstick from smudging in the edges and give your lipstick an even look. It is especially recommended for dark or bold shades to hold your lipstick in place.

Also Read:9 Easy Ways to Enhance Your Beauty Naturally

Coat your lipstick with powder after applying: After applying lipstick, apply some powder on it that make your lipstick last longer. Dapple a little bit on YOUR index finger, blot onto your lips, and smack them together to rub it in.

Eat carefully. If you are out in a function where you will have food, try not to eat oily food as it fades your lipstick faster. Also, take small bites of food.

Reapply and twist: First apply your lipstick normally and remove the excess one from the edges using a tissue.Then reapply a final layer to darken the shade again, but instead of smearing the lipstick across your lips, place the lipstick on your lips and twist it in. Twisting the lips will be a better option than swearing them since it fills the cracks rather than just placing the product on top.

-prepared by Pragya Mittal of NewsGram |Twitter @PragyaMittal05


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