Wednesday November 13, 2019

Eating Fish Twice a Week Reduces the Risk of Heart Failure

Consuming fish which are high in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week can help reduce the risk of heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and ischemic stroke, says a new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association.

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Based on the doses given in the study, humans should consume two to three servings of fish a week to have the same effect. Pixabay
Based on the doses given in the study, humans should consume two to three servings of fish a week to have the same effect. Pixabay

Consuming fish which are high in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week can help reduce the risk of heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and ischemic stroke, says a new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association.

The Association recommends eating two 3.5-ounce servings of non-fried fish, or about three-fourth cup of flaked fish every week.

Emphasis should be placed on eating oily fish like salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines or albacore tuna, which are all high in omega-3 fatty acids.

 

Representational image. Pixabay

 

“Scientific studies have established the beneficial effects of eating seafood rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, especially when it replaces less healthy foods such as meats that are high in artery-clogging saturated fat,” said Eric B. Rimm, Professor at the Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, US.

Further, the advisory, published in the journal Circulation, laid emphasis on eating fish such as shark, swordfish, tilefish, king mackerel, bigeye tuna, marlin and orange roughy that are high in mercury.

Even though mercury contamination has been linked with serious neurological problems in newborns, it does not have adverse effects on heart disease risk in adults, the advisory noted.

key to a healthy heart
Fish also contains Omega-3 fatty acids which help with depression. Pixabay

Moreover, the benefits of eating fish substantially outweighed any risks associated with mercury contamination, especially if a variety of seafood is consumed, it said.

According to a study, published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, adding fatty fish to our diet increases the size and lipid composition of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles, also known as good cholesterol, in people with impaired glucose metabolism.

Also Read: According to Research, No Exercise For 6 Years Can Trigger Heart Failure Risk

Another study, published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, showed that Omega-3 fatty acids are more beneficial than flaxseed and other oils for preventing cancer. (IANS)

Next Story

Dog Ownership Leads to Longer Life And Healthy Heart

Studies Show that Dog ownership alleviates social isolation, improves physical activity and lowers blood pressure

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Keeping a dog is a good motivation for physical activity, which is an important factor in rehabilitation and mental health. Pixabay

A dog at home means longer life and better cardiovascular health, especially for heart attack and stroke survivors who live alone, according to a new study and a separate meta-analysis on the subject.

Prior studies have shown that dog ownership alleviates social isolation, improves physical activity and even lowers blood pressure.

“The two new studies provide good, quality data indicating dog ownership is associated with reduced cardiac and all-cause mortality,” said Glenn N.Levine, Chair of the writing group of the American Heart Association’s scientific statement on pet ownership.

Researchers in this study compared the health outcomes of dog owners and non-owners after a heart attack or stroke using health data provided by the Swedish National Patient Register.

The patients studied were Swedish residents aged 40-85 who experienced a heart attack or an ischemic stroke from 2001-2012.

Dog
Having a dog is associated with increased physical exercise, lower blood pressure levels and better cholesterol. Pixabay

Compared to people who did not own a dog, researchers found that for dog owners, the risk of death for heart attack patients living alone after hospitalization was 33 per cent lower, and 15 per cent lower for those living with a partner or child.

The risk of death for stroke patients living alone after hospitalization was 27 per cent lower and 12 per cent lower for those living with a partner or child.

In the study, nearly 182,000 people were recorded to have had a heart attack, with almost 6 per cent being dog owners, and nearly 155,000 people were recorded to have had an ischemic stroke, with almost 5 per cent being dog owners.

The lower risk of death associated with dog ownership could be explained by an increase in physical activity and the decreased depression and loneliness, both of which have been connected to dog ownership in previous studies.

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Compared to people who do not own a dog, Study says that for dog owners, the risk of death for heart attack patients living alone after hospitalization is 33 per cent lower. Pixabay

“Keeping a dog is a good motivation for physical activity, which is an important factor in rehabilitation and mental health,” said Tove Fall, professor at Uppsala University in Sweden.

In the meta-analysis, Researchers reviewed patient data of over 3.8 million people taken from 10 separate studies for a composite meta-analysis study.

Researchers found that compared to non-owners, dog owners experienced a 24 per cent reduced risk of all-cause mortality, 65 per cent reduced risk of mortality after heart attack; and 31 per cent reduced risk of mortality due to cardiovascular-related issues.

“Having a dog was associated with increased physical exercise, lower blood pressure levels and better cholesterol profile in previous reports,” said Caroline Kramer, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto.

ALSO READ: Microsoft Planning to Launch a New Keyboard with Emoji Menu

The findings of the study and meta-analysis were published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a journal of the American Heart Association. (IANS)