Eat Grapes to protect your Teeth from Decay: Study

The results of the study suggests that the natural compound, found in grapes, has been found to tighten Dentin- the tissue which forms the bulk of one’s tooth, lying beneath the tough external enamel

0
grapes, improvement of teeth
Consumption of grapes can lead to having healthier teeth. Pixabay

Washington D.C. (USA), June 13, 2017: A recent study has suggested that consumption of grapes can lead to having healthier teeth. A natural compound that is found in grapes, can strengthen the one’s teeth by boosting the strength of fillings and the gums, resulting in protecting the teeth from decaying early, reported ANI.

The discovery can stop people from losing their teeth early- the scientists of the Illinois University at Chicago college of Dentistry, have said. The extract from the grape seed, which is a byproduct of the wine industry is sold at health food stores, has long been considered beneficial in improving cardiac health and better circulation.

ALSO READ: Pile on Nutrition on your Child’s plate and make it look Yummy yet Healthy: Experts

According to ANI’s reports, the substance is being considered to reduce tooth extractions as it can increase the longevity of the tooth colored fillings or the composite resin fillings that are known to last no more than five to seven years.

The results of the study suggests that the extract has been found to tighten Dentin- the tissue which forms the bulk of one’s tooth, lying beneath the tough external enamel. Hence, when the teeth get damaged, the remaining part can be strengthened to bond with the materials utilized in fillings.

According to the reports of ANI, this discovery appears as a good news for patients opting for resin-fillings due to the fact that those are more aesthetically pleasing; even though those are not as strong as the amalgam-fillings, lasting for 10 to 15 years or even more than that.

Dr. Ana Bedran Russo, a researcher, stated that decay forms around the failed filling and then the seal gets damaged then. The team is working on reinforcing the interface so that the resin bonds better to the Dentin; ANI reported.

Tooth decay is caused due to acid production from plaque that forms in one’s teeth.

The acid begins to damage the surface of the teeth forming holes referred as cavities, when plaque is allowed to form in the teeth. The cavity then starts eating away the second surface of tooth material, lying beneath the enamel- the Dentin.

According to ANI reports, researchers stated that better adhesion is provided by interlocking the collagen rich Dentin and the resin, without having to rely on moisture.

The study appeared on the Dental Research journal.

– prepared by Antara Kumar of NewsGram. Twitter: @ElaanaC 

Next Story

New Bioactive Peptide May Prevent Dental Cavity and Tooth Decay

Researchers develop new gel to maintain dental health

0
Tooth decay
Researchers have developed a bioactive peptide that coats tooth surfaces, helping prevent new cavities and heal existing ones in lab experiments. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Researchers have developed a bioactive peptide that coats teeth surfaces, helping prevent new cavities and heal existing ones in lab experiments.

Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organisation.

Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist’s office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, teeth loss, infection, and even illness or death.

Conventional treatment for dental cavities involves removing decayed tissue and filling the hole with materials, such as amalgam or composite resin.

However, this procedure can damage healthy tissue and cause severe discomfort for patients.

Tooth decay
Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist’s office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, tooth loss, infection, and even illness or death. Pixabay

For the findings, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, research team from the Hong Kong University in China, wanted to develop a two-pronged strategy to prevent and treat tooth decay.

Prevent colonisation of the tooth surface by the plaque-forming bacteria that cause cavities, and reduce demineralisation, or the dissolving of tooth enamel, while increasing remineralisation, or repair, said study researchers Hai Ming Wong and Quan Li Li .

The researchers based their anti-cavity coating on a natural antimicrobial peptide called H5.

Produced by human salivary glands, H5 can adsorb onto tooth enamel and destroy a broad range of bacteria and fungi.

To promote remineralisation, the team added a phosphoserine group to one end of H5, which they thought could help attract more calcium ions to repair the enamel than natural H5.

According to the study, they tested the modified peptide on slices of human molars.

Compared with natural H5, the new peptide adsorbed more strongly to the tooth surface, killed more bacteria and inhibited their adhesion, and protected teeth from demineralisatios, the study said.

Also Read- Twitter to Clearview AI: Stop Downloading Images to Build Facial Recognition Database

Surprisingly, however, both peptides promoted remineralisation to a similar degree.

After brushing, people could someday apply the modified peptide to their teeth as a varnish or gel to protect against tooth decay, the researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story

Teeth-Whitening Products Can Lead To Protein-Rich Dentin Tissue Damage

The researchers pointed out that their experiments did not address whether collagen and other proteins in the teeth can be regenerated, so it is unknown if the tooth damage is permanent. 

0
teeth
Unlike most studies which have focused on tooth enamel, the new study focused on dentin, which makes up most of the tooth and has high levels of protein -- most of which is collagen. Pixabay

While using teeth-whitening products can make your smile brighter, they might also lead to tooth damage, researchers have warned.

The study, led by researchers from the Stockton University in the US, found that hydrogen peroxide — the active ingredient in whitening strips — can damage the protein-rich dentin tissue found beneath the tooth’s protective enamel.

Human teeth is made up of three layers — the outer tooth enamel, an underlying dentin layer and connective tissue that binds the roots to the gum.

Unlike most studies which have focused on tooth enamel, the new study focused on dentin, which makes up most of the tooth and has high levels of protein — most of which is collagen.

tooth
The study, led by researchers from the Stockton University in the US, found that hydrogen peroxide — the active ingredient in whitening strips — can damage the protein-rich dentin tissue found beneath the tooth’s protective enamel. Pixabay

The team demonstrated that the major protein in the dentin is converted to smaller fragments when treated with hydrogen peroxide. In additional experiments, they treated pure collagen with hydrogen peroxide and then analysed the protein using a gel electrophoresis laboratory technique that allows the protein to be visualized.

“Our results showed that treatment with hydrogen peroxide concentrations similar to those found in whitening strips is enough to make the original collagen protein disappear, which is presumably due to the formation of many smaller fragments,” said Kelly Keenan, Associate Professor at the varsity.

teeth
Human teeth is made up of three layers — the outer tooth enamel, an underlying dentin layer and connective tissue that binds the roots to the gum. Pixabay

The researchers pointed out that their experiments did not address whether collagen and other proteins in the teeth can be regenerated, so it is unknown if the tooth damage is permanent.

Also Read: YouTube Joins The Race to Stream Interactive Content, After Netflix’s Raising Popularity
Further, they plan to characterize the protein fragments released when collagen is treated with hydrogen peroxide and determine if hydrogen peroxide has the same impact on other proteins in the teeth.

The findings were presented during the 2019 Experimental Biology meeting held in Orlando, Florida. (IANS)

Next Story

Are you addicted to Drugs? Well, it may cause Tooth Decay and periodontal Disease

0
Drugs, Wikimedia

Sydney, March 17, 2017: If you are addicted to drugs, you may be at greater risk of developing tooth decay and periodontal disease than people with no substance use disorders, a study has showed.

The findings, led by Hooman Baghaie from the University of Queensland in Australia, showed that drug use affects oral health through direct physiological routes such as dry mouth, an increased urge for snacking, clenching and grinding of teeth and chemical erosion from applying cocaine to teeth and gums.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The lifestyle that often accompanies problematic drug use also affects oral health through high sugar diets, malnutrition, poor oral hygiene, and lack of regular professional dental care.

Patients with substance use disorders also exhibited greater tooth loss, non-carious tooth loss and destructive periodontal disease.

In addition, tolerance to pain killers and anaesthetics also contributes to poor dental care, the researchers said, in the paper published in the journal Addiction.

Oral health has significant consequences on quality of life and general health. In addition to functional and self-esteem issues that accompany bad teeth, the chronic inflammation and bacteraemia (bacteria in the blood) characteristic of poor oral health increases the incidence of coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes and respiratory disease.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Researchers suggested that doctors and clinicians should screen people with substance use disorders for oral diseases and arrange for dental care as needed.

“They should consider using sugar-free preparations when prescribing methadone as well as warn patients of the oral health risks associated with dry mouth and cravings for sweet foods,” Baghaie suggested.

For the study, the team combined the results of 28 studies from around the world, which collectively provided data on 4,086 dental patients with substance use disorder and 28,031 controls. (IANS)