Sunday July 22, 2018

Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk

Previous studies have showed that consuming half a cup of walnut per day may help protect the digestive system

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Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk
Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk. Pixabay
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Consuming walnuts — rich in antioxidants — may nearly halve the risk of developing Type-2 diabetes compared to those who do not eat nuts, finds a study representing more than 34,000 adults.

The findings showed doubling walnut consumption (or eating 3 tablespoons) was associated with a 47 per cent lower prevalence of Type-2 diabetes.

“The strong connection between walnut consumers and lower prevalence of Type-2 diabetes is additional justification for including walnuts in the diet. Other research has shown that walnuts may also be beneficial for cognitive function and heart health,” said Lenore Arab from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

For the study, the team looked at 34,121 adults aged 18-85 years who were asked about their dietary intake as well as if they had been diagnosed with diabetes or if they were taking medications for diabetes.

walnut
representational image. Pixabay

Individuals were also assessed for diabetes using common laboratory measurements including fasting plasma glucose and haemoglobin A1c.

Those who reported consuming walnuts showed a lower risk for Type-2 diabetes compared to those who did not consume any nuts regardless of age, gender, race, education, BMI and amount of physical activity.

Walnuts are a rich source of recommended polyunsaturated fat (13 grams per ounce), and the only nuts that contain a significant amount of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) — the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid (2.5 grams per one ounce). It also offers protein (4 grams per one ounce) and fibre (2 grams per one ounce).

Also Read: TB Vaccine May Help to Control Type-1 Diabetes, Says Study

Previous studies have showed that consuming half a cup of walnut per day may help protect the digestive system by increasing the amount of probiotic bacteria in the gut and warding off risks of heart and brain diseases as well as cancer. (IANS)

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Diabetes? Living Near Woods May Cut Risk of Elevated Blood Sugar

The researchers hope that the findings will prompt doctors and other healthcare professionals to recommend patients to spend more time in greenery and natural areas

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Spending more time with nature also increased sleep duration and significantly reduced the levels of salivary cortisol -- a physiological marker of stress.
Spending more time with nature also increased sleep duration and significantly reduced the levels of salivary cortisol -- a physiological marker of stress. Pixabay

Feeling unwell? Instead of popping up a pill, sitting in the lap of nature can have various health benefits, says a study.

The findings showed that living near the nature or getting regular exposure to greenery may reduce the risk of a host of illnesses including Type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, high blood pressure, preterm birth and stress — and boost overall health.

“We often reach for medication when we’re unwell but exposure to health-promoting environments is increasingly recognized as both preventing and helping treat disease. Our study shows that the size of these benefits can be enough to have a meaningful clinical impact,” said Andy Jones from Britain’s University of East Anglia (UEA).

“People living near greenery likely have more opportunities for physical activity and socializing. Meanwhile, exposure to a diverse variety of bacteria present in natural areas may also have benefits for the immune system and reduce inflammation,” said lead author, Caoimhe Twohig-Bennett from UEA’s Norwich Medical School.

Health-boosting properties of forest bathing can be explained by Phytoncides, which are organic compounds with antibacterial properties, released by trees, the researchers said.
Health-boosting properties of forest bathing can be explained by Phytoncides, which are organic compounds with antibacterial properties, released by trees, the researchers said. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Environmental Research, the team studied data from over 140 studies involving more than 290 million people from 20 countries including the UK, the US, Spain, France, Germany, Australia and Japan.

Spending more time with nature also increased sleep duration and significantly reduced the levels of salivary cortisol — a physiological marker of stress.

Also Read: Air Pollution Linked to 3.2 Million New Diabetes Cases in One Year

The researchers hope that the findings will prompt doctors and other healthcare professionals to recommend patients to spend more time in greenery and natural areas.

“We hope that this research will inspire people to get outside more and feel the health benefits for themselves. Hopefully our results will encourage policymakers to invest in the creation, regeneration, and maintenance of parks and greenery, particularly in urban residential areas,” Twohig-Bennett noted. (IANS)

One response to “Diabetes? Living Near Woods May Cut Risk of Elevated Blood Sugar”

  1. Bad sugar. I found out I had type 2. I had no idea what to do or how I was going to eat. I did know that I was very motivated not to take medication. Then I read a diabetes story (google ” How I Freed Myself From Diabetes ” ) Eight weeks later I have lost 35 pounds and am not taking any medication and have a blood glucose reading that averages 105. The first few days saw an immediate change. I went from a blood glucose reading of 314 to 143 in three days. I immediately started shedding weight without exercise.