Thursday November 21, 2019

Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk

Previous studies have showed that consuming half a cup of walnut per day may help protect the digestive system

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Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk
Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk. Pixabay

Consuming walnuts — rich in antioxidants — may nearly halve the risk of developing Type-2 diabetes compared to those who do not eat nuts, finds a study representing more than 34,000 adults.

The findings showed doubling walnut consumption (or eating 3 tablespoons) was associated with a 47 per cent lower prevalence of Type-2 diabetes.

“The strong connection between walnut consumers and lower prevalence of Type-2 diabetes is additional justification for including walnuts in the diet. Other research has shown that walnuts may also be beneficial for cognitive function and heart health,” said Lenore Arab from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

For the study, the team looked at 34,121 adults aged 18-85 years who were asked about their dietary intake as well as if they had been diagnosed with diabetes or if they were taking medications for diabetes.

walnut
representational image. Pixabay

Individuals were also assessed for diabetes using common laboratory measurements including fasting plasma glucose and haemoglobin A1c.

Those who reported consuming walnuts showed a lower risk for Type-2 diabetes compared to those who did not consume any nuts regardless of age, gender, race, education, BMI and amount of physical activity.

Walnuts are a rich source of recommended polyunsaturated fat (13 grams per ounce), and the only nuts that contain a significant amount of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) — the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid (2.5 grams per one ounce). It also offers protein (4 grams per one ounce) and fibre (2 grams per one ounce).

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Previous studies have showed that consuming half a cup of walnut per day may help protect the digestive system by increasing the amount of probiotic bacteria in the gut and warding off risks of heart and brain diseases as well as cancer. (IANS)

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Study Says, Early Signs of Diabetes Can be Observed in Children

The study tracked over 4,000 participants of the Children of the 90s study, a birth cohort established in Bristol in the early 1990s

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Diabetes
The research was conducted among young healthy people who were generally free of type 2 Diabetes and other chronic diseases to see how early in life the effects of diabetes susceptibility become visible. Pixabay

Researchers have found that early signs of adulthood type 2 Diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old.

Type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in middle age or later, with its symptoms slowly developing over many years.

“It’s remarkable that we can see signs of adult diabetes in the blood from such a young age, this is about 50 years before it’s commonly diagnosed.

“This is not a clinical study; nearly all participants were free of diabetes and most will not go on to develop it. This is about liability to disease and how genetics can tell us something about how the disease develops,” said study researcher Joshua Bell from the University of Bristol in the UK.

The research was conducted among young healthy people who were generally free of type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases to see how early in life the effects of diabetes susceptibility become visible.

The study tracked over 4,000 participants of the Children of the 90s study, a birth cohort established in Bristol in the early 1990s.

The researchers combined genetics with an approach called ‘metabolomics’, which involves measuring many small molecules in a blood sample to try and identify patterns that are unique to type 2 diabetes.

According to the findings, the research team analysed 162 pieces of genetic information and combined this with 200 measures of many small molecules in a blood sample, known as metabolics, to identify signs of type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes
Researchers have found that early signs of adulthood type 2 Diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old. Pixabay

Data was taken once in childhood — at 8 years old, twice in adolescence aged 16 and 18 years and once in young adulthood aged 25 years.

They found levels of HDL cholesterol were reduced at age 8, while inflammatory glycoprotein acetyls and amino acids were elevated in 16 and 18 year old teenagers.

These metabolic features could be targeted to prevent young people from going on to develop type 2 diabetes in the future, the researchers said.

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The findings were presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona. (IANS)