Monday September 24, 2018

Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk

Previous studies have showed that consuming half a cup of walnut per day may help protect the digestive system

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Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk
Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk. Pixabay
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Consuming walnuts — rich in antioxidants — may nearly halve the risk of developing Type-2 diabetes compared to those who do not eat nuts, finds a study representing more than 34,000 adults.

The findings showed doubling walnut consumption (or eating 3 tablespoons) was associated with a 47 per cent lower prevalence of Type-2 diabetes.

“The strong connection between walnut consumers and lower prevalence of Type-2 diabetes is additional justification for including walnuts in the diet. Other research has shown that walnuts may also be beneficial for cognitive function and heart health,” said Lenore Arab from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

For the study, the team looked at 34,121 adults aged 18-85 years who were asked about their dietary intake as well as if they had been diagnosed with diabetes or if they were taking medications for diabetes.

walnut
representational image. Pixabay

Individuals were also assessed for diabetes using common laboratory measurements including fasting plasma glucose and haemoglobin A1c.

Those who reported consuming walnuts showed a lower risk for Type-2 diabetes compared to those who did not consume any nuts regardless of age, gender, race, education, BMI and amount of physical activity.

Walnuts are a rich source of recommended polyunsaturated fat (13 grams per ounce), and the only nuts that contain a significant amount of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) — the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid (2.5 grams per one ounce). It also offers protein (4 grams per one ounce) and fibre (2 grams per one ounce).

Also Read: TB Vaccine May Help to Control Type-1 Diabetes, Says Study

Previous studies have showed that consuming half a cup of walnut per day may help protect the digestive system by increasing the amount of probiotic bacteria in the gut and warding off risks of heart and brain diseases as well as cancer. (IANS)

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Avoid Diabetes With Yoga, Weight Lifting

They studied the effects of weekly time spent on resistance exercise, lower intensity muscular conditioning exercises and aerobic moderate and vigorous physical activity

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Yoga
Avoid Diabetes by practicing Yoga. Pixabay

If you wish to avoid diabetes, better start exercising for just half-an-hour a day, a Harvard University research has found while advising yoga and weight lifting.

According to the research, the chance of developing Type 2 diabetes was cut by between 30 and 40 per cent with just three-and-a-half hours of exercise a week, Daily Mail reported Wednesday.

It was also found that just an hour’s workout every week could cut the risk by 13 percent.

The study, which followed 100,000 women, also showed muscle-strengthening exercises such as yoga and weight lifting fend off the condition.

Scientists showed that those doing at least 150 minutes of aerobic activity a week – and at least an hour of muscle-strengthening – had the best results.

Weight Lifting
Weight Lifting. Pixabay

Published by the journal PLOS Medicine, the study was carried out by scientists from Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Southern Denmark.

Researchers studied 99,316 middle-aged and older women, who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, for eight years. During the period, 3,491 women developed Type 2 diabetes.

They studied the effects of weekly time spent on resistance exercise, lower intensity muscular conditioning exercises and aerobic moderate and vigorous physical activity.

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“Our study suggests that engagement in muscle-strengthening and conditioning activities (resistance exercise, yoga, stretching, toning) is associated with a lower risk of (Type 2 diabetes),” the researchers said.

“Despite limitations to which this research can be applied to women in general, it underlines the message that leading an active healthy lifestyle can help to reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes,” said Richard Elliott, research communications officer at Diabetes, UK. (IANS)