Wednesday September 19, 2018

Eating in 10-hours Window May Boost Health

Many of us may have one or more disease-causing defective genes that make us feel helpless and destined to be sick. The finding that a good lifestyle can beat the bad effects of defective genes opens new hope to stay healthy

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Restricting meal intake in 10-hour window may boost health. Pixabay
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Following a simple lifestyle such as eating all food within 10 hours can restore balance, stave off metabolic diseases and maintain health, suggests a study led by one of an Indian-origin.

The study, conducted over mice, suggests that the health problems associated with disruptions to animals’ 24-hour rhythms of activity and rest — which in humans is linked to eating for most of the day or doing shift work — can be corrected by eating all calories within a 10-hour window.

“For many of us, the day begins with a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and ends with a bedtime snack 14 or 15 hours later,” said Satchidananda Panda, Professor at the Salk Institute.

“But restricting food intake to 10 hours a day, and fasting the rest, can lead to better health, regardless of our biological clock,” he added.

The researchers demonstrated that the circadian clocks strikes a balance between sufficient nutrition during the fed state and necessary repair or rejuvenation during fasting.

When this internal clock is disrupted, as when humans do shift work, or when it is compromised due to genetic defects, the balance breaks down and diseases set in.

Health
The researchers demonstrated that the circadian clocks strikes a balance between sufficient nutrition during the fed state and necessary repair or rejuvenation during fasting. Pixabay

For the study, which appeared in the journal Cell Metabolism, the team disabled the genes responsible for maintaining the biological clock in mice, including in the liver, which regulates many metabolic functions.

They then put the mice on one of two high-fat diet regimes: one group had access to food around the clock, the other had access to the same number of calories only during a 10-hour window.

As expected, the group that could eat at any time became obese and developed metabolic diseases.

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But the group that ate the same number of calories within a 10-hour window remained lean and healthy — despite not having an internal “biological clock” and thereby genetically programmed to be morbidly sick.

“Many of us may have one or more disease-causing defective genes that make us feel helpless and destined to be sick. The finding that a good lifestyle can beat the bad effects of defective genes opens new hope to stay healthy,” Panda said. (IANS)

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Asthma Ups The Chance Of Obesity: Study

The increase in the risk of obesity was even greater in people whose asthma began in adulthood.

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay

While obesity is already known as a risk factor for developing asthma, a new research led by one of an Indian-origin has showed that people with the airway disease are also more likely to become obese.

The study indicates that those who develop asthma as adults and those who have non-allergic asthma are at the greatest risk of obesity.

The relationship between asthma and obesity is more complex than previously thought and more research is needed to better understand and tackle these two growing health challenges, the researchers said.

Obesity, Asthma
They found that 10.2 per cent of people with asthma at the start of the study had become obese ten years on Flickr Commons

“We already know that obesity can be a trigger for asthma, perhaps via a physiological, metabolic or inflammatory change,” said Subhabrata Moitra, research student at the ISGlobal – the Barcelona Institute for Global Health in Spain.

However, the researchers do not know the reason why having asthma increases the risk of developing obesity or whether different asthma treatments have any effect on this risk.

The team included 8,618 people from 12 countries who were followed for 20 years.

Obesity, Pregnancy
The relationship between asthma and obesity is more complex than previously thought. Pixabay

They found that 10.2 per cent of people with asthma at the start of the study had become obese ten years on. Among people who did not have asthma, 7.7 per cent were obese ten years later.

Also Read: Exposure to Pollen During Pregnancy May up The risk of Asthma in Kids

The increase in the risk of obesity was even greater in people whose asthma began in adulthood. It was also greater in people who had asthma but did not suffer with allergies, the findings showed.

The results were presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in Paris. (IANS)