Tuesday March 26, 2019

Eating in 10-hours Window May Boost Health

Many of us may have one or more disease-causing defective genes that make us feel helpless and destined to be sick. The finding that a good lifestyle can beat the bad effects of defective genes opens new hope to stay healthy

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Health
Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that makes people obsessive about their weight. Pixabay

Following a simple lifestyle such as eating all food within 10 hours can restore balance, stave off metabolic diseases and maintain health, suggests a study led by one of an Indian-origin.

The study, conducted over mice, suggests that the health problems associated with disruptions to animals’ 24-hour rhythms of activity and rest — which in humans is linked to eating for most of the day or doing shift work — can be corrected by eating all calories within a 10-hour window.

“For many of us, the day begins with a cup of coffee first thing in the morning and ends with a bedtime snack 14 or 15 hours later,” said Satchidananda Panda, Professor at the Salk Institute.

“But restricting food intake to 10 hours a day, and fasting the rest, can lead to better health, regardless of our biological clock,” he added.

The researchers demonstrated that the circadian clocks strikes a balance between sufficient nutrition during the fed state and necessary repair or rejuvenation during fasting.

When this internal clock is disrupted, as when humans do shift work, or when it is compromised due to genetic defects, the balance breaks down and diseases set in.

Health
The researchers demonstrated that the circadian clocks strikes a balance between sufficient nutrition during the fed state and necessary repair or rejuvenation during fasting. Pixabay

For the study, which appeared in the journal Cell Metabolism, the team disabled the genes responsible for maintaining the biological clock in mice, including in the liver, which regulates many metabolic functions.

They then put the mice on one of two high-fat diet regimes: one group had access to food around the clock, the other had access to the same number of calories only during a 10-hour window.

As expected, the group that could eat at any time became obese and developed metabolic diseases.

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But the group that ate the same number of calories within a 10-hour window remained lean and healthy — despite not having an internal “biological clock” and thereby genetically programmed to be morbidly sick.

“Many of us may have one or more disease-causing defective genes that make us feel helpless and destined to be sick. The finding that a good lifestyle can beat the bad effects of defective genes opens new hope to stay healthy,” Panda said. (IANS)

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Childhood Maltreatment Strongest Risk Factor for Depression in Adulthood: Lancet

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome

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depression
Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression. Pixabay

Facing trauma in childhood can significantly change the structure of the brain, which may result in severe depression which could even be recurrent in adulthood, say researchers.

The results from MRI scan images suggest that both childhood maltreatment and recurring depression are associated with similar reductions in the surface area of the insular cortex, part of the brain that regulates emotion and self-awareness.

This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, which found childhood maltreatment one of the strongest risk factors for major depression in adulthood.

depression
Depression is among the leading causes of disability in the U.S. and is being closely monitored by health authorities amid rising suicides nationwide. Pixabay

“Given the impact of the insular cortex on brain functions such as emotional awareness, it’s possible that the changes we saw make patients less responsive to conventional treatments,” said lead researcher Nils Opel from the University of Munster in Germany.

The study included 110 patients aged 18 to 60 years. Of the 75 patients who experienced a relapse, 48 had experienced one additional episode, seven reported two episodes, and six experienced three episodes.

Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression.

depression
This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. Pixabay

ALSO READ: 4 Indian-American Teenagers Awarded for Inventions in Environmental Issues

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome.

Future psychiatric research should therefore explore how the findings could be translated into special attention, care and treatment that could improve patient outcomes, the study noted. (IANS)