Friday February 28, 2020

Eating An Egg Daily May Keep Diabetes At Bay

In addition, the researchers identified several biochemical compounds in blood that predicted a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, including the amino acid tyrosine

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Reason Why Middle-Aged Men Should Limit Their Protein Intake
An egg a day may keep diabetes away.

Eating an egg daily can have a beneficial effect on the blood metabolite profile that is related to a lower risk of Type-2 diabetes, a new study shows.

The findings showed that the blood samples of men who ate more eggs included certain lipid molecules that positively correlated with the blood profile of men who remained free of Type-2 diabetes.

“The study explored potential compounds that could explain this association using non-targeted metabolomics, a technique that enables a broad profiling of chemicals in a sample,” said lead author Stefania Noerman from the University of Eastern Finland.

Eggs remain one of the most controversial food items.High intake of eggs has traditionally been discouraged, mainly due to their high cholesterol content.

However, eggs are also a rich source of many bioactive compounds that can have beneficial effects on health. This means that the health effects of consuming eggs are difficult to determine based solely on their cholesterol content, the researchers said.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, 239 serum samples were analysed in four groups: men with higher (mean intake one egg per day) or lower (mean intake two eggs per week) egg intake who developed Type-2 diabetes (cases) or remained healthy (controls) during the mean follow-up of nearly 20 years.

The study suggested some plausible mechanisms which could at least partly explain the inverse association between egg intake and the previously observed lower risk of developing Type-2 diabetes.

Also Read- Protein Found in Spinach May Treat Alcohol Abuse, Mood Disorders

In addition, the researchers identified several biochemical compounds in blood that predicted a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes, including the amino acid tyrosine.

“Although it is too early to draw any causal conclusions, we now have some hints about certain egg-related compounds that may have a role in Type-2 diabetes development.

“Further detailed investigations with both cell models and intervention studies in humans that use modern techniques, such as metabolomics, are needed to understand the mechanisms behind physiological effects of egg intake,” Noerman noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Higher Testosterone Levels may Lead to Type 2 Diabetes in Women: Study

Higher testosterone levels ups diabetes risk in women

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Diabetes
Higher testosterone levels increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes in women, while reducing the risk in men. Pixabay

Health researchers have revealed that having genetically higher testosterone levels increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes in women, while reducing the risk in men.

Higher testosterone levels also increase the risks of breast and endometrial cancers in women, and prostate cancer in men, according to the study published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Despite finding a strong genetic component to circulating testosterone levels in men and women, the authors found that the genetic factors involved were very different between the sexes.

“Our findings provide unique insights into the disease impacts of testosterone. In particular they emphasise the importance of considering men and women separately in studies, as we saw opposite effects for testosterone on diabetes,” said study lead author Katherine Ruth from University of Exeter in UK.

For the findings, the research team used genome wide association studies (GWAS) in 4,25,097 UK Biobank participants to identify 2,571 genetic variations associated with differences in the levels of the sex hormone testosterone and its binding protein sex-hormone binding globulin (SHGB).

Diabetes
Researchers found that in women, genetically higher testosterone increases the risks of type 2 diabetes by 37 per cent, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by 51 per cent. Pixabay

The researchers verified their genetic analyses in additional studies, including the EPIC-Norfolk study and Twins UK, and found a high level of agreement with their results in UK Biobank.

The team next used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to understand whether known associations between testosterone levels and disease are causal rather than correlative.

They found that in women, genetically higher testosterone increases the risks of type 2 diabetes by 37 per cent, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by 51 per cent.

However, they also found that having higher testosterone levels reduces T2D risk in men by 14 per cent.

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Additionally, they found that genetically higher testosterone levels increased the risks of breast and endometrial cancers in women, and prostate cancer in men.

“Our findings that genetically higher testosterone levels increase the risk of PCOS in women is important in understanding the role of testosterone in the origin of this common disorder, rather than simply being a consequence of this condition,” said study researcher John Perry from University of Cambridge. (IANS)