Wednesday May 23, 2018

Here’s how eating fish could be IQ booster for your kid

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Fish acts like an IQ booster. Here's how!
Fish acts like an IQ booster. Here's how! Pixabay
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Want to sharpen your kids’ mental skills and boost intelligence quotient (IQ) levels? Fish will act as an IQ booster.

The findings show:

  • Children who eat fish at least once a week sleep better
  • Have IQ scores that are four points higher, on average, than those who consume fish less frequently or not at all.
  • Those whose meals sometimes included fish scored 3.3 points higher.
  • Increased fish consumption was associated with fewer disturbances of sleep, which the researchers say indicates better overall sleep quality.
Other than acting as an IQ booster, fish has many other benefits Pixabay
Other than acting as an IQ booster, fish has many other benefits Pixabay

How it was done

For the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, a cohort of 541 nine to 11-year-olds in China — 54 per cent boys and 46 per cent girls — completed a questionnaire about how often they consumed fish in the past month.

Their parents then answered questions about sleep quality, which included topics such as sleep duration and frequency of night waking or daytime sleepiness.

Fish has omega-3 which reduces anti-social behavior Pixabay
Fish has omega-3 which reduces anti-social behavior Pixabay

Connected dots

Previous studies showed a relationship between omega-3s, the fatty acids in many types of fish, and improved intelligence, as well as omega-3s and better sleep. But they’ve never all been connected before.

The new study reveals sleep as a possible mediating pathway — the potential missing link between fish and intelligence, the researchers said.

“Lack of sleep is associated with antisocial behaviour, poor cognition is associated with antisocial behaviour,” said Adrian Raine, Professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

“We have found that omega-3 supplements reduce antisocial behaviour, so it’s not too surprising that fish is behind this.”

The study “adds to the growing body of evidence showing that fish consumption has really positive health benefits and should be something more heavily advertised and promoted”, said Jennifer Pinto-Martin, Professor at the varsity. (IANS)

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Eating Fish Twice a Week Reduces the Risk of Heart Failure

Consuming fish which are high in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week can help reduce the risk of heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and ischemic stroke, says a new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association.

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Based on the doses given in the study, humans should consume two to three servings of fish a week to have the same effect. Pixabay
Based on the doses given in the study, humans should consume two to three servings of fish a week to have the same effect. Pixabay

Consuming fish which are high in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week can help reduce the risk of heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and ischemic stroke, says a new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association.

The Association recommends eating two 3.5-ounce servings of non-fried fish, or about three-fourth cup of flaked fish every week.

Emphasis should be placed on eating oily fish like salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines or albacore tuna, which are all high in omega-3 fatty acids.

 

Representational image. Pixabay

 

“Scientific studies have established the beneficial effects of eating seafood rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, especially when it replaces less healthy foods such as meats that are high in artery-clogging saturated fat,” said Eric B. Rimm, Professor at the Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, US.

Further, the advisory, published in the journal Circulation, laid emphasis on eating fish such as shark, swordfish, tilefish, king mackerel, bigeye tuna, marlin and orange roughy that are high in mercury.

Even though mercury contamination has been linked with serious neurological problems in newborns, it does not have adverse effects on heart disease risk in adults, the advisory noted.

key to a healthy heart
Fish also contains Omega-3 fatty acids which help with depression. Pixabay

Moreover, the benefits of eating fish substantially outweighed any risks associated with mercury contamination, especially if a variety of seafood is consumed, it said.

According to a study, published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, adding fatty fish to our diet increases the size and lipid composition of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles, also known as good cholesterol, in people with impaired glucose metabolism.

Also Read: According to Research, No Exercise For 6 Years Can Trigger Heart Failure Risk

Another study, published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, showed that Omega-3 fatty acids are more beneficial than flaxseed and other oils for preventing cancer. (IANS)