Monday December 16, 2019

Eating Fish may Reduce the Risk of Asthma by 70%, finds Study

For the study, the team included 642 people who worked in a fish processing factory in a village in South Africa

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Around 334 million people worldwide suffer from asthma, and about a quarter of a million people die from it every year. Pixabay

Eating fish oil, rich in omega 3 fatty acids, can help reduce the risk of asthma by nearly 70 per cent, finds a study.

Fish oil is known to be rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) or n-3 and contains omega fatty acids 3 and 6, which play a central role in the normal development and functioning of the brain and central nervous system.

The study found that “certain types of n-3 (from marine oils) were significantly associated with a decreased risk of having asthma or asthma-like symptoms by up to 62 per cent, while high n-6 consumption (from vegetable oils) was associated with an increased risk by up to 67 per cent,” said Andreas Lopata, Professor from the James Cook University in Australia.

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However, she stressed the need for further work to understand how the beneficial role of n-3 could be optimised and negative effects of n-6 be minimised. Pixabay

Around 334 million people worldwide suffer from asthma, and about a quarter of a million people die from it every year.

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“Even if you factor in contaminants, such as mercury found in some fish populations, the benefits of fish and seafood intake far more outweighs the potential risks,” Lopata said, in the paper published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

However, she stressed the need for further work to understand how the beneficial role of n-3 could be optimised and negative effects of n-6 be minimised.

For the study, the team included 642 people who worked in a fish processing factory in a village in South Africa. (IANS)

Next Story

Obesity Spikes up Asthma Risk in Children

"Addressing childhood obesity should be a priority to help improve the quality of life of children and help reduce paediatric asthma," Finkel noted

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Obesity increases asthma risk in children: Study. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Obese children are at an increased risk of asthma, a new study has found.

The findings suggest that the incidence of an asthma diagnosis among children with obesity was significantly higher than in those in a normal weight range and that 23 to 27 per cent of new asthma cases were directly attributable to obesity.

“Paediatric asthma is among the most prevalent childhood conditions and comes at a high cost to patients, families and the greater health system,” said co-author Terri Finkel from Nemours Children’s Hospital in Orlando.

“There are few preventable risk factors to reduce the incidence of asthma, but our data show that reducing the onset of childhood obesity could significantly lower the public health burden of asthma,” Finkel added.

For the study published in the journal Paediatrics, the research team analysed medical records of more than 500,000 children.

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The study provides new insight that could help us predict and manage diseases like asthma – which are a significant public health burden. IANS

The researchers reviewed de-identified data of patients aged two to 17 without a history of asthma, receiving care from six paediatric academic medical centres between 2009 and 2015.

Overweight or obese patients were matched with normal weight patients of the same age, gender, race, ethnicity, insurance type and location of care.

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The researchers found that obesity among children with asthma appears to increase disease severity. Being overweight was identified as a modest risk factor for asthma, and the association was diminished when the most stringent definition of asthma was used.

“Addressing childhood obesity should be a priority to help improve the quality of life of children and help reduce paediatric asthma,” Finkel noted. (IANS)