Wednesday October 24, 2018

Eating Fresh Fruits Everyday May Keep Diabetes at Bay

In addition, higher consumption of fresh fruit in people with diabetes, led to the decrease in mortality risk of 1.9 per cent at five years, and lower risks of microvascular and macrovascular complications

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A bowl of fresh fruits a day may lower the risk of developing diabetes by 12 per cent, a study has showed. Pixabay
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In individuals with diabetes, consuming fresh fruit more than three days a week was associated with a 17 per cent lower relative risk of dying.

Further, it can lower the risk of developing diabetes-related complications affecting large blood vessels — ischaemic heart disease and stroke — and small blood vessels — kidney diseases, eye diseases, and neuropathy — by 13-28 per cent, the findings revealed.

Although the health benefits of diets including fresh fruit and vegetables are well established, the relatively high sugar content of fruit has led to uncertainty about associated risks of diabetes and of vascular complications of the disease, said Huaidong Du of the University of Oxford.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

This has led to frequent abstention from fruit consumption among individuals with diabetes in many parts of the world, he noted in the paper published in the journal PLOS Medicine.

The study, which assessed nearly 500,000 people from China, also showed that people who reported elevated consumption of fresh fruit had an estimated 0.2 per cent reduction in the absolute risk of diabetes over five years.

Also Read: LGBQ Teens at Higher Risk of Diabetes Than Heterosexual Youth, Finds Study

In addition, higher consumption of fresh fruit in people with diabetes, led to the decrease in mortality risk of 1.9 per cent at five years, and lower risks of microvascular and macrovascular complications. (Bollywood Country)

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Avoid Diabetes With Yoga, Weight Lifting

They studied the effects of weekly time spent on resistance exercise, lower intensity muscular conditioning exercises and aerobic moderate and vigorous physical activity

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Avoid Diabetes by practicing Yoga. Pixabay

If you wish to avoid diabetes, better start exercising for just half-an-hour a day, a Harvard University research has found while advising yoga and weight lifting.

According to the research, the chance of developing Type 2 diabetes was cut by between 30 and 40 per cent with just three-and-a-half hours of exercise a week, Daily Mail reported Wednesday.

It was also found that just an hour’s workout every week could cut the risk by 13 percent.

The study, which followed 100,000 women, also showed muscle-strengthening exercises such as yoga and weight lifting fend off the condition.

Scientists showed that those doing at least 150 minutes of aerobic activity a week – and at least an hour of muscle-strengthening – had the best results.

Weight Lifting
Weight Lifting. Pixabay

Published by the journal PLOS Medicine, the study was carried out by scientists from Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Southern Denmark.

Researchers studied 99,316 middle-aged and older women, who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, for eight years. During the period, 3,491 women developed Type 2 diabetes.

They studied the effects of weekly time spent on resistance exercise, lower intensity muscular conditioning exercises and aerobic moderate and vigorous physical activity.

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“Our study suggests that engagement in muscle-strengthening and conditioning activities (resistance exercise, yoga, stretching, toning) is associated with a lower risk of (Type 2 diabetes),” the researchers said.

“Despite limitations to which this research can be applied to women in general, it underlines the message that leading an active healthy lifestyle can help to reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes,” said Richard Elliott, research communications officer at Diabetes, UK. (IANS)

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