Sunday August 19, 2018

Eating Fresh Fruits Everyday May Keep Diabetes at Bay

In addition, higher consumption of fresh fruit in people with diabetes, led to the decrease in mortality risk of 1.9 per cent at five years, and lower risks of microvascular and macrovascular complications

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Eat fresh fruits
A bowl of fresh fruits a day may lower the risk of developing diabetes by 12 per cent, a study has showed. Pixabay
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In individuals with diabetes, consuming fresh fruit more than three days a week was associated with a 17 per cent lower relative risk of dying.

Further, it can lower the risk of developing diabetes-related complications affecting large blood vessels — ischaemic heart disease and stroke — and small blood vessels — kidney diseases, eye diseases, and neuropathy — by 13-28 per cent, the findings revealed.

Although the health benefits of diets including fresh fruit and vegetables are well established, the relatively high sugar content of fruit has led to uncertainty about associated risks of diabetes and of vascular complications of the disease, said Huaidong Du of the University of Oxford.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

This has led to frequent abstention from fruit consumption among individuals with diabetes in many parts of the world, he noted in the paper published in the journal PLOS Medicine.

The study, which assessed nearly 500,000 people from China, also showed that people who reported elevated consumption of fresh fruit had an estimated 0.2 per cent reduction in the absolute risk of diabetes over five years.

Also Read: LGBQ Teens at Higher Risk of Diabetes Than Heterosexual Youth, Finds Study

In addition, higher consumption of fresh fruit in people with diabetes, led to the decrease in mortality risk of 1.9 per cent at five years, and lower risks of microvascular and macrovascular complications. (Bollywood Country)

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Here’s How Mushrooms can Help in the Treatment of Diabetes

Managing glucose better has implications for diabetes, as well as other metabolic diseases

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Mushrooms
How mushrooms can aid in diabetes treatment, Find out here. Pixabay

Eating white button mushrooms daily can act as a prebiotic by improving microbial community in the gut, which could then improve the regulation of glucose in the liver, a finding that could one day pave way for new diabetes treatments, say researchers.

In the study, feeding white button mushrooms to mice changed the composition of gut microbes — microbiota — to produce more short chain fatty acids, specifically propionate from succinate, according to Margherita T. Cantorna, Professor at Pennsylvania State University in the US.

Previous research has shown that succinate and propionate can change the expression of genes needed to manage glucose production, she said.

“Managing glucose better has implications for diabetes, as well as other metabolic diseases,” Cantorna noted.

The study, reported in the Journal of Functional Foods, used two types of mice who were fed about a daily serving size of the mushrooms. One group had microbiota, the other were germ-free.

Mushrooms
Mushrooms. Pixabay

Consuming the mushrooms set off a chain reaction among the gut bacteria, expanding the population of Prevotella — a bacteria that produces propionate and succinate.

These acids can change the expression of genes that are key to the pathway between the brain and the gut that helps manage the production of glucose, or gluconeogenesis.

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The mushrooms, in this case, serve as a prebiotic, which is a substance that feeds beneficial bacteria that are already existing in the gut. Probiotics are live beneficial bacteria that are introduced into the digestive system.

Beyond the possible beneficial benefits of mushrooms as a prebiotic, Cantorna said that this study also shows more evidence that there is a tight connection between diet and microbiota.

“It’s pretty clear that almost any change you make to the diet, changes the microbiota,” Cantorna added. (IANS)