Sunday February 24, 2019

Edunomics : Economics made fun

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https://youtu.be/LQLuuQ-RESA

Two high school students, Sahith Malyala and Sahil Yedulla, found a club named Edunomics, last year when they started studying Economics in their high school.

They decided to visit their middle school again and teach the younger students, once a week, to the interested kids the basic of Economics, a science which both of them enjoys so much and wanted others to have an access to its wonderful world as well.

The idea took a form of a solid reality when in the words, of Sahil, the co-founder of the club got a text from now another of the co-founder, Sahith, if they both can found a new Economics club. According to Sahith, he conceived this idea because according to him there are not as many as Economics related organizations out there, as there should be.

The next step was implemented when the neighbors and childhood friends of the two boys, took and shared their idea with David Stephenson, a Keyboard and Business skills teacher at Farwell Station Middle School.

Stephenson, who now acts as the supervisor for Educonomics, says that: “I have never had students come back and say this is what I really wanna do. I thought it was a fantastic idea”.

They found out that simplifying Global Economics, Finance and Business by them fun and interactive for the students is the key to get students more involved and interested in the field.

Each week, there is first a 5-10 minutes lecture which is held on a new topic and to make the students really get the core of it all, they play an interactive game on it.

Sahith cited that these games illustrated to the kids the real world applicability of the things they teach them.

While Stevenson says that Edunomics has been profitable for both the older students which help them to become better and stronger leaders in their lives as well as for the younger ones who are actually more receptive when high schoolers teach them.

Though both the co-founders of the club, Sahil and Sahith and leaving for their colleges, the coming year, David assured that the club will continue to give other students the opportunity to teach and learn. (Input from agencies)

Next Story

The Unconventional Way of Learning: Textbooks Come Alive in Gujarat’s Schools

Outdated teaching methods, lack of interest among students and teachers, and gender discrimination were some of the common problems.

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Outdated teaching methods, lack of interest among students and teachers, and gender discrimination were some of the common problems. Pixabay

 In a small school near Bhuj in Gujarat, a group of class five students sit attentively in class, their eyes glued to an LCD screen. The opened science books on their laps have come alive on the screen before them, as an animated character explains the nuances of the chapter in their native language, Gujarati. Efficient learning, experts say, happens when students enjoy the experience, and in hundreds of schools across Gujarat, digitised school textbooks are opening up children’s minds like never before.

Learning Delight, the hand that is turning the wheel of change in 10,000 government schools, mostly in rural and semi-urban areas across the state, has been digitising the state curriculum since 2011, and has the approval of the Gujarat Council of Educational Research and Training (GCERT). The idea is simple: use technology to aid classroom teaching to make the learning process more engaging, more efficient – and definitely more fun.

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This led the two to use technology and design, an e-learning tool that would aid classroom teaching.. Pixabay

So much so, that in a survey done in 350 schools where they have a presence, Parinita Gohil, co-founder of Learning Delight, said, “The dropout rate among children studying between Class 1 and Class 8 has come down by 6-7 per cent in the past five years.”

It all started a decade back when two friends, Harshal Gohil and Vandan Kamdar, who were doing their MBA, realised that there was a huge gap in education between schools in different settings. Outdated teaching methods, lack of interest among students and teachers, and gender discrimination were some of the common problems. This led the two to use technology and design, an e-learning tool that would aid classroom teaching.

“Harshal and Vandan began with a survey in five schools. Here they found that although there was no dearth in infrastructure – the schools had computers – there was scepticism about using them,” Parinita Gohil, who is married to Harshal Gohil, told IANS. The resistance mainly arose because “most teachers were not comfortable with the English language, were scared of using the computer, and apprehensive if the computers would replace their role”.

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There has, however, been an exception in this digitisation process – the language textbooks, be it English, Hindi, or Gujarati, have been left out. Pixabay

Therefore, the offline computer software that they developed was designed in such a way that a teacher’s presence was necessary in the class. The medium of instruction was Gujarati. “So be it any subject – science, math, social studies – the content was digitised in a way that through animation, riddles, puzzles, and stories textbook learning is made more interactive and fun,” Parinita Gohil said. The experts who designed the digitised content also had teachers on board.

Also Read: Goa Acknowledges Drop in Tourist Arrivals

There has, however, been an exception in this digitisation process – the language textbooks, be it English, Hindi, or Gujarati, have been left out. “We don’t want children to leave reading their books. So, while we have digitised the grammar lessons, language textbooks have been left as they are,” she said.

Next in the pipeline is a mobile phone app being developed with a similar software and a foray into Rajasthan, for which software has been developed in Hindi and in tandem with the Rajasthan state education board. (IANS)