Sunday December 15, 2019

Edunomics : Economics made fun

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https://youtu.be/LQLuuQ-RESA

Two high school students, Sahith Malyala and Sahil Yedulla, found a club named Edunomics, last year when they started studying Economics in their high school.

They decided to visit their middle school again and teach the younger students, once a week, to the interested kids the basic of Economics, a science which both of them enjoys so much and wanted others to have an access to its wonderful world as well.

The idea took a form of a solid reality when in the words, of Sahil, the co-founder of the club got a text from now another of the co-founder, Sahith, if they both can found a new Economics club. According to Sahith, he conceived this idea because according to him there are not as many as Economics related organizations out there, as there should be.

The next step was implemented when the neighbors and childhood friends of the two boys, took and shared their idea with David Stephenson, a Keyboard and Business skills teacher at Farwell Station Middle School.

Stephenson, who now acts as the supervisor for Educonomics, says that: “I have never had students come back and say this is what I really wanna do. I thought it was a fantastic idea”.

They found out that simplifying Global Economics, Finance and Business by them fun and interactive for the students is the key to get students more involved and interested in the field.

Each week, there is first a 5-10 minutes lecture which is held on a new topic and to make the students really get the core of it all, they play an interactive game on it.

Sahith cited that these games illustrated to the kids the real world applicability of the things they teach them.

While Stevenson says that Edunomics has been profitable for both the older students which help them to become better and stronger leaders in their lives as well as for the younger ones who are actually more receptive when high schoolers teach them.

Though both the co-founders of the club, Sahil and Sahith and leaving for their colleges, the coming year, David assured that the club will continue to give other students the opportunity to teach and learn. (Input from agencies)

Next Story

Students with Higher Emotional Intelligence Better Academic Performance

Emotionally intelligent students get better grades

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Emotional intelligence
A student needs to learn to manage his/her emotions in order to get better grades. Lifetime Stock

It’s not enough to be smart and hardworking and students must also be able to understand and manage their emotions — a skill known as emotional intelligence — to do better at school than their less skilled peers as measured by test scores, says a study.

The concept of emotional intelligence as an area of academic research is relatively new but there is evidence that social and emotional learning programmes in schools are effective at improving academic performance.

“Although we know that high intelligence and a conscientious personality are the most important psychological traits necessary for academic success, our research highlights a third factor, emotional intelligence, that may also help students succeed,” said Carolyn MacCann from University of Sydney.

MacCann and her colleagues analyzed data from more than 160 studies, representing more than 42,000 students from 27 countries, published between 1998 and 2019.

Emotional Intelligence
Students who are emotionally intelligent may be better able to manage negative emotions. Lifetime Stock

More than 76 per cent were from English-speaking countries and the students ranged in age from elementary school to college.

The researchers found that students with higher emotional intelligence tended to get higher grades and better achievement test scores than those with lower emotional intelligence scores.

What was most surprising to the researchers was the association held regardless of age, said the study published in the journal Psychological Bulletin.

As for why emotional intelligence can affect academic performance, MacCann believes a number of factors may come into play.

“Students with higher emotional intelligence may be better able to manage negative emotions, such as anxiety, boredom and disappointment, that can negatively affect academic performance,” she said.

“Also, these students may be better able to manage the social world around them, forming better relationships with teachers, peers and family, all of which are important to academic success.”

Also Read- This Protein in the Human Brain Can Protect Against Alzheimer’s disease

MacCann cautions against widespread testing of students to identify and target those with low emotional intelligence as it may stigmatize those students.

Instead, she recommends interventions that involve the whole school, including additional teacher training and a focus on teacher well-being and emotional skills. (IANS)