Friday September 21, 2018

Edunomics : Economics made fun

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https://youtu.be/LQLuuQ-RESA

Two high school students, Sahith Malyala and Sahil Yedulla, found a club named Edunomics, last year when they started studying Economics in their high school.

They decided to visit their middle school again and teach the younger students, once a week, to the interested kids the basic of Economics, a science which both of them enjoys so much and wanted others to have an access to its wonderful world as well.

The idea took a form of a solid reality when in the words, of Sahil, the co-founder of the club got a text from now another of the co-founder, Sahith, if they both can found a new Economics club. According to Sahith, he conceived this idea because according to him there are not as many as Economics related organizations out there, as there should be.

The next step was implemented when the neighbors and childhood friends of the two boys, took and shared their idea with David Stephenson, a Keyboard and Business skills teacher at Farwell Station Middle School.

Stephenson, who now acts as the supervisor for Educonomics, says that: “I have never had students come back and say this is what I really wanna do. I thought it was a fantastic idea”.

They found out that simplifying Global Economics, Finance and Business by them fun and interactive for the students is the key to get students more involved and interested in the field.

Each week, there is first a 5-10 minutes lecture which is held on a new topic and to make the students really get the core of it all, they play an interactive game on it.

Sahith cited that these games illustrated to the kids the real world applicability of the things they teach them.

While Stevenson says that Edunomics has been profitable for both the older students which help them to become better and stronger leaders in their lives as well as for the younger ones who are actually more receptive when high schoolers teach them.

Though both the co-founders of the club, Sahil and Sahith and leaving for their colleges, the coming year, David assured that the club will continue to give other students the opportunity to teach and learn. (Input from agencies)

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The Biggest Casualty In Yemen’s War- Education

Yemen also suffers from a shortage of learning facilities.

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Girls attend a class at their school damaged by a recent Saudi-led air strike, in the Red Sea port city of Hodeidah, Yemen.VOA

The school year in Yemen is officially underway. But, the U.N. children’s fund reports the country’s ongoing civil war is keeping millions of children out of the classroom.

More than three years of fighting between the Yemeni government and Houthi rebels is having a devastating impact on children’s health and well-being. The U.N. reports more than 11 million children or 80 percent of the country’s children are dependent upon humanitarian aid.

Another major casualty of the war is children’s education. The U.N. children’s fund says the education sector is on the brink of collapse because of conflict, political divisions and chronic underdevelopment.

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UNICEF: Education a Major Casualty of Yemen’s War.

As a consequence, UNICEF spokesman Christophe Boulierac said around two million children are not going to school this year. Furthermore, he said nearly four million primary school children soon may not be able to get an education because of a severe shortage of teachers.

“About 67 percent of public school teachers — and this is across the country — have not been paid for nearly two years. Many have looked for other work to survive or are only teaching a few subjects. So, obviously, the quality of education is at stake. Children are not getting their full lessons due to the absence of their teachers. Even when schools are functioning, the schools’ days and years are shortened.”

Yemen also suffers from a shortage of learning facilities. UNICEF reports more than 2,500 schools have been damaged or destroyed by the war. Many schools also are being used as shelters for displaced people and some have been taken over by armed groups.

Yemen
FILE – A supporter carries posters depicting Houthi leader Abdel-Malek al-Houthi during a rally in Sana’a, Yemen, March 6, 2015.
Image source: VOA

The agency warns children who are out of school run many dangers. It notes boys are at risk of being used as child soldiers. It estimates more than 2,600 children have been recruited by all armed groups.

Also Read: North Kivu And Ituri, Congo To Welcome More Than 80,000 Children In This New School Year

UNICEF says girls are likely to be married off at an early age. A 2016 survey finds close to three quarters of women in Yemen have been married before the age of 18, and 44.5 percent before the age of 15. (VOA)

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