Tuesday August 14, 2018

Effect of Air Pollution: Escalates Mortality Risk, Besides Causing Deadly Diseases like Lung and Kidney Cancer

Air pollution can increase the risk of death from kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer besides causing lung cancer

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Effect of Air pollution
Air pollution may lead to deadly diseases like lung and kidney cancer. Pixabay.
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London, Nov 1: Air pollution can increase the risk of death from kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer besides causing lung cancer, a study has showed.

According to researchers, air pollution represents a complex mixture of a broad range of carcinogenic and mutagenic substances that may play a role in chronic systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage in tissues that could ultimately prove fatal.

“This research suggests that the effect of air pollution was not associated with death from most non-lung cancers, but the associations with kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer deserve further investigation,” said lead author Michelle Turner, researcher at the Barcelona Institute of Global Health (ISGlobal) in Spain.

effect of Air Pollution
The effect of Air Pollution is deadly, causing non lung cancers as well. Pixabay.

For the study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, the team included more than 600,000 adults in the US and examined associations of mortality from cancer at 29 sites with long-term residential exposure to three ambient pollutants: PM2.5, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3).

ALSO READ: Air Pollution Expected to cause 60000 deaths by 2030

Over 43,000 non-lung cancer deaths were registered among the participants. PM2.5 was associated with mortality from kidney and bladder cancer, with a 14 and 13 per cent increase respectively, for each 4.4 µg/m3 (microgram) increase in exposure.

In turn, exposure to NO2 was associated with colorectal cancer death, with a 6 per cent increase per each 6.5 ppb (parts per billion) increment.

No significant associations were observed with cancer at other sites. (IANS)

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Air Pollution Linked to Changes in Heart Structure

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart, the findings showed

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Air Pollution.
Air pollution may lead to changes in heart structure. Pixabay

Researchers have found that people exposed to even low levels of air pollution can have changes in the structure of the heart, similar to those seen in the early stages of heart failure.

For every one extra microgram per cubic metre of PM2.5 — small particles of air pollution — and for every 10 extra microgram per cubic metre of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the heart enlarges by approximately 1 per cent, showed the findings of the Britain-based study published in the journal Circulation.

“Although our study was observational and hasn’t yet shown a causal link, we saw significant changes in the heart, even at relatively low levels of air pollution exposure,” said one of the researchers Nay Aung from Queen Mary University of London.

For the study, the researchers looked at data from around 4,000 participants in the UK Biobank study, where volunteers provided a range of personal information, including their lifestyles, health record and details on where they have lived.

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart,
Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart. Pixabay

Participants also had blood tests and health scans, and heart MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) was used to measure the size, weight and function of the participants’ hearts at fixed times.

The team found a clear association between those who lived near loud, busy roads, and were exposed to nitrogen dioxide or PM2.5 and the development of larger right and left ventricles in the heart.

Also Read: Air Pollution Linked to 3.2 Million New Diabetes Cases in One Year

The ventricles are important pumping chambers in the heart and, although these participants were healthy and had no symptoms, similar heart remodelling is seen in the early stages of heart failure.

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart, the findings showed. (IANS)