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Tulsi, wikimedia
  • Tulsi Leaves possesses antibiotic, anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties.
  • It also works as a great detoxifying, cleansing and purifying agent – both from within and without.
  • It helps relieve stress, strengthens immunity, and facilitates proper digestion

June 22, 2017: Tulsi: Also known as the holy basil or ocimum sanctum, tulsi is a common name in most Indian households and a very important part of it as well. There are many reasons why Tulsi is so popular in India “because of benefits of tulsi”. It is very easy to grow and it can be widely found in the Indian subcontinent. Not only is tulsi considered a revered, holy plant in Hinduism; it has also been mentioned in the ancient science of Ayurveda. There are two common varieties of tulsi widely available – the green hued Lakshmi tulsi and the purple coloured Krishna tulsi. Other than the Indian subcontinent, it can also be spotted in tropical regions of most of the Southeast Asian countries. There are many facts & benefits of tulsi leaves, we are going to talk about.

Tulsi is grown in many Hindu households, worshiped and offered to the gods. Don’t think this is just because of religious superstitions, this inexpensive and meek inexpensive herb comes loaded with numerous benefits. Tulsi is medically proven to be extremely beneficial for humans. Just a few leaves of tulsi, when used regularly, can help take care of a host of health and lifestyle related issues- from warding off some of the most common ailments, strengthening immunity to fighting bacterial & viral infections and even combating and treating various hair and skin disorders.


How and when to Grow

Tulsi plant need an atmosphere that offers rich and moist soil with ample sunlight. The sapling should be planted just a few centimetres below the soil with a light cover of dirt. It is better if the plant is allowed to grow indoors till it’s about 6-7 inch tall, after which the plant can be transferred outdoors. The best time for planting tulsi is right before monsoon, under intense heat.

How to Consume It & Get The Benefits of Tulsi

It can be consumed raw, plucked fresh from the plant or it can be added in your morning tea. You can always opt for the healthy tulsi kadha. Other than the conventional ways of consuming the humble, holy basil, you can experiment with tulsi in your cuisines . It guarantees an exquisite, earthy, aromatic flavour to the preparations.

ALSO READ: Ayurveda can Help Evade Scorching Summer Heat: Here is How!

Home Remedies

It is one of the most commonly and widely used ingredients in many popular Indian home remedies. Tulsi can help heal, or to some extent facilitate, treating most diseases from regular fever to some of the deadliest and most fatal viral and bacterial infections. Dr. Simran Saini from New Delhi believes consuming a drink made by boiling tulsi leaves and adding about 2grams of black pepper to it, helps in building your immunity. It also acts as an antibacterial element and helps in recovery from dengue. Then there is the quintessential kadha – a mix of ginger, tulsi leaves, peppercorn (crushed) in boiling hot water – which is usually seen as a potion that can put most illnesses straight and has been used by Indian mothers for eternity. Don’t think these are all the holy herb has to offer, there is a bundle of other beneficial properties that tulsi comes with. Here’s a list of all benefits of tulsi/basil:

1. It possesses antibiotic, anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties.

2. It works as a great detoxifying, cleansing and purifying agent – both from within and without.

3. Therefore it is good for skin – both when consumed and applied topically.

4. It has been proven to be effective in treating skin disorders, itching and issues like ringworms.

5.It helps in relieving from fever, sore throat, headache, flu, cold cough and chest congestion.

6. It can be made into teas or other drinks or can be consumed raw, powdered, paste or in form herbal supplements.

7. It helps relieve stress, strengthens immunity, and facilitates proper digestion.

8. It comes loaded with phytonutrients, essential oils, Vitamin A and C.

Basil/Tulsi Is A Boon For Pregnant Lady

9. It is also beneficial in treating respiratory problems like chronic bronchitis, asthma and more.

10. It counters elevated blood sugar levels and is therefore beneficial for diabetics.

11. It helps in regulating uric acid levels in body, thereby elimination risks of developing kidney stones.

12. Regular tulsi consumption can also help in balancing various bodily processes.

13. It is proven to be largely beneficial for dental hygiene and healthier gums.

14. It can ward off the harmful effects of free radicals.

15. According to the Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, India, tulsi is effective in maintaining normal levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the body.

16. In treating conditions like hepatitis, malaria, tuberculosis, dengue and swine flu, tTulsi has remarkable benefits to offer.

17. Is an effective insect repellant and can also help in treating insect bite.

18. It is also known as adaptogen.

Isn’t it high time to make the humble holy basil a part of daily life now?

– by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter: @dubumerang


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