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Who is Eisenstein? Google remembers him!

A Google doodle honouring Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein

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The doodle also shows Sergei Eisenstein, holding a film roll and a scissors depicting a cut or an edit. Wikimedia Commons
The doodle also shows Sergei Eisenstein, holding a film roll and a scissors depicting a cut or an edit. Wikimedia Commons
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  • Google doodle honouring Soviet film director Sergei Eisenstein
  • He is also the father of montage in filmmaking
  • He was 50, when he died following a heart attack on February 11, 1948

Google on Monday honoured Soviet film director and father of montage in filmmaking Sergei Eisenstein on his 120th birth anniversary with a doodle.

The doodle shows a series of film rolls in movement depicting iconic imagery in some of Eisenstein’s films. It is a reminder of his enduring contributions to cinema.

A closer look into the doodle shows sequencing of a number of images in a continuous loop creating the effect of a montage.

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The Russian genius changed the way films were made as early as in the 1920s. Wikimedia Commons
The Russian genius changed the way films were made as early as in the 1920s. Wikimedia Commons

The avant-garde filmmaker was born on this day in 1898. He left behind a rich legacy that is complex and in many ways, immeasurable.

Film montage is an editing technique that pieces together a series of frames to form a continuous sequence that is used at several defining moments in films — you can easily recall some of it in “The Godfather”, “The Karate Kid”, that was refined in the early 20th century by the Soviet director.

Born in Latvia, young Eisenstein started off in the footsteps of his father and took up architecture and engineering, he later joined the Red Army to serve the Bolshevik Revolution.

During this time, he developed an interest in theatre and started working as a designer in Moscow.

Eisenstein’s films are politically loaded and they galvanised cinema of the former Soviet Union and beyond with their bold narrative approach, stylistic flourishes, dramatic use of cinematography, editing and music, and marriage between ideology and the craft of filmmaking.

Describing his cinematic vision, Google said, "His films were also revolutionary in another sense, as he often depicted the struggle of downtrodden workers against the ruling class." Wikimedia Commons
Describing his cinematic vision, Google said, “His films were also revolutionary in another sense, as he often depicted the struggle of downtrodden workers against the ruling class.” Wikimedia Commons

ALSO READ: Google’s doodle honours R.D. Burman on 77th birth anniversary

“Strike” in 1925, “Battleship Potemkin” (1925), “October” (1928), “Que viva México!” (1930, released in 1979), “Alexander Nevsky” (1938) and “Ivan The Terrible” (1944 and 1958)demonstrate Eisenstein’s genius, his contributions to the art of editing through his theories on montage, and his ability to transcend propaganda to create enduring art.

He was only 50, when he died following a heart attack on February 11, 1948. (IANS)

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Google Doodle Celebrates First Message of Humanity into Space

Astronomer and astrophysicist Frank Drake from Cornell University wrote the message with the help from American astronomer Carl Sagan, among others

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Google Doodle celebrates humanity's first message into space. (VOA)

In 1974, scientists sent humankind’s first, three-minute long interstellar radio message – the Arecibo Message – and 44 years later, Google on Friday celebrated the feat with a Doodle.

The Arecibo message is a 1974 interstellar radio message carrying basic information about humanity and Earth sent to globular star “cluster M13” 25,000 light years away, with a hope that extraterrestrial intelligence might receive and decipher it.

The message was sent from the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.

It had exactly 1,679 binary digits (210 bytes) which, if arranged in a specific way, can explain basic information about humanity and earth to extraterrestrial beings.

Doodle 4 google
Representational Image of ‘Doodle for Google’. Flickr

The message was broadcast into space a single time via frequency modulated radio waves.

Astronomer and astrophysicist Frank Drake from Cornell University wrote the message with the help from American astronomer Carl Sagan, among others.

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“It was a strictly symbolic event, to show that we could do it,” Cornell University professor Donald Campbell was quoted as saying in an Independent report.

Since it will take nearly 25,000 years for the message to reach its destination — and an additional 25,000 years for a reply, if any, the Arecibo message is viewed as the first demonstration of human technological achievement. (IANS)