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Election Integrity Forces Twitter to Delay Account Verification Process

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey has also acknowledged that the system "needs a complete reboot"

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Twitter officially kills off key features in third-party apps. Pixabay
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Looming elections in Pakistan, the US, Brazil and India have forced Twitter to shelve its public account verification programme as the micro-blogging platform is busy tackling the spread of fake news and misinformation, the company said on Wednesday.

Twitter “does not presently have the bandwidth” to overhaul its verification system and provide a blue checkmark to true accounts, said Kayvon Beykpour, Product Head, in a series of tweets.

“We’ve heard some questions recently about the status of verification on Twitter, so wanted to address directly. Updating our verification programme isn’t a top priority for us right now (election integrity is),” Beykpour said.

“I don’t believe we have the bandwidth to address this holistically without coming at the cost of other priorities and distracting the team,” Beykpour added.

Pakistan goes to the polls on July 25, Brazil in October, the US mid-term in November and India early next year.

Twitter
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

Twitter in November paused public verification because it wanted to address the issue that verifying the authenticity of an account was being conflated with endorsement.

“Our intention was to hit the brakes until we had a fix across policy/enforcement/product.

“Though we’ve made a lot of progress towards a holistic solution, the truth is that this work is still incomplete and we’re choosing not to prioritise it just now,” Beykpour noted.

Also Read: Twitter Suspends 2 Accounts Linked to Russian Intelligence After Hacking Indictment

Twitter is currently focused on information quality ahead of the elections.

“This focus will help us move faster on what we think is most important. After we make more progress, we plan to address Verification,” the Twitter product head said.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey has also acknowledged that the system “needs a complete reboot”. (IANS)

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Social Media Giants Face Complications Dealing With Online Offensive Speech

Tech companies are known for constantly tweaking their products and software. Now it seems they are taking the same approach with speech.

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Social media. Offensive Speech
An iPhone with Twitter, Facebook and other apps, May 21, 2013. U.S. internet companies are taking a harder look at their policies that have promoted free expression around the world.. VOA

Twitter users are blocking companies like Pepsi, Nike and Uber on Twitter to pressure the social media firm to permanently ban American broadcaster Alex Jones for what they say are his abusive tweets and offensive speech.

Meanwhile, Twitter reportedly is facing a shutdown in Pakistan because of a government request to block what it deems objectionable content.

The moves come as U.S. internet companies take a harder look at their policies that have promoted free expression around the world. The companies have a mostly hands-off policy when it comes to curtailing speech, except when it comes to inciting violence and pornography. But that largely permissive approach is getting a new look.

Alex Jones
Alex Jones from Infowars.com speaks during a rally in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump near the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. VOA

Twitter and Alex Jones

Twitter recently slapped a seven-day ban on conservative American radio host Jones for violating its policy on abusive speech, when he appeared to call for violence against the media, something he denies.

On his show this week, Jones noted that Twitter had removed his videos.

“They took me down,” he said. “Because they will not let me have a voice.”

Earlier this month, Apple, Spotify, Facebook, YouTube and other social media limited Jones and his InfoWars media company from their sites. But InfoWars’ live-streaming app can still be found at Google and Apple’s app stores. The on-air personality has put forth conspiracy theories calling some U.S. mass shootings hoaxes.

No more hands off

Internet firms are moving away from the long-held position that they didn’t want to monitor expression on their sites too closely, Irina Raicu, director of the Internet Ethics Program at Santa Clara University, said.

“The companies are stuck in the middle and no longer trying to avoid responsibility in a way that I think they were even a few years ago when they were saying we are just neutral platforms,” Raicu said. “They are increasingly taking a more open role in determining what content moderation looks like.”

It’s not just in the U.S. where the internet companies are having to make hard decisions about speech. The firms are also grappling with extreme speech in other languages.

Comments on Facebook have been linked to violence in places like Myanmar and India. A recent article by the Reuters news agency reports that negative messages about Myanmar’s Rohingya minority group were throughout its site.

social media apps
It’s not just in the U.S. where the internet companies are having to make hard decisions about speech. Wikimedia

Some call on social media companies to do more to target and take down hate messages before they lead to violence.

“If Facebook is bent on removing abusive words and nudity, they should be focused on removing these words as well,” said Abhinay Korukonda, a student from Mumbai, India, who is studying at the University of California, Berkeley. “This comes under special kinds of abusive terms. They should take an action. They should definitely remove these.”

Objective standards

Ming Hsu studies decision-making at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. He is researching how to come up with objective standards for determining whether certain speech could lead to real-world dangers against people both in the U.S. and across the globe.

“We don’t have actionable standards for policymakers or for companies or even lay people to say, ‘This is crossing the boundaries, this is way past the boundaries and this is sort of OK,’” Hsu said.

Those calls are even harder when looking at speech in other languages and cultures, he added.

Also Read: Twitter CEO Expands on Why He Won’t Ban Alex Jones, Infowars

“We don’t really have any intuition for who’s right, who is wrong and who is being discriminated against,” Hsu said. “And that gets back to relying on common sense and how fragile that is.”

Tech companies are known for constantly tweaking their products and software. Now it seems they are taking the same approach with speech as they draw the line between free expression and reducing harm. (VOA)