Saturday November 17, 2018

Emotional problems during adolescence can lead to unemployment

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London: Suffering from emotional problems in adolescence is a key risk factor for future joblessness irrespective of socio-economic background, says a study.

The research found clear evidence that distressed adolescents, who tend to feel nervous or depressed rather than calm or happy, subsequently experienced higher levels of joblessness in early adulthood.

The findings showed that adolescents who were highly distressed at ages 16 to 20 were 32 percent more likely to be unemployed and 26 percent more likely to be unemployed or out of the workforce in early adulthood.

“The findings provide strong evidence that distressed adolescents are vulnerable to unemployment and suggest that this vulnerability increased during the recent difficult economic period following the Great Recession,” said lead researcher Mark Egan from University of Stirling in Britain.

The study, published in the journal Social Science & Medicine, examined the employment patterns of over 7,000 Americans over a 12-year period, born in the period 1980-1984.

The findings revealed that the adverse impact of psychological distress on job prospects grew in the years following the 2007-2009 Great Recession where those with a history of distress experienced a pronounced rise in joblessness.

The trends held even when comparing distressed to non-distressed siblings, suggesting that emotional problems carry a heavy penalty even among brothers and sisters from the same background.

Economic benefits could be gained by treating mental health issues in early life and the researchers called for investment in this area.

“Investing in childhood and adolescent mental health services could have economic benefits including reducing population-level unemployment,” Egan noted.

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  • Shriya Katoch

    Its time teenage problems are tended to seriously and not viewed as teenage antics.

  • a

    Absolutely correct Shriya ! Kids are growing up way too fast these days and internet in every hand has created havoc in the lives of youngsters. Serious thought must be given in India to finding ways to restrict internet use below the age of 21.

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Lack of Proper Sanitation Affects 620 Million Children Around The World: Report

Despite the improvements, more than a third of the girls in South Asia miss school for one to three days a month during their period.

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toilets, studentsac
A new toilet recently installed in a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. VOA

A lack of proper school toilets threatens the health, education and safety of at least 620 million children around the world, the charity WaterAid said in a new study published Friday.

Children at 1 in 3 schools lack access to proper toilets, putting them at risk of diarrhea and other infections and forcing some to miss lessons altogether, according to the study, based on data from 101 countries.

Guinea-Bissau in West Africa has the worst school toilets while Ethiopian children fare worst at home, with 93 percent of homes lacking a decent toilet according to the report, released ahead of World Toilet Day on Monday.

toilets, students
Students arrive for class at the Every Nation Academy private school in the city of Makeni in Sierra Leone, April 20, 2012. VOA

“The message here is that water and sanitation affect everything,” WaterAid spokeswoman Anna France-Williams told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “If there’s no toilet in schools, children will miss lessons and it will have an impact on their growing up.”

Diarrhea, infection risk

A lack of proper sanitation puts millions of children around the world in danger of diarrhea, which kills 289,000 children younger than 5 a year, WaterAid said.

But some regions have started to clean up their act, notably South Asia, where access to toilets in schools has improved.

More than half the schools in Bangladesh now have access to decent toilets, while students in 73 percent of schools in India and 76 percent of those in Bhutan can access basic sanitation.

Akramul Islam, director of water, sanitation and hygiene at the Bangladeshi charity BRAC, said the country’s once-high levels of open defecation — using open ground rather than toilets — were now less than 1 percent.

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India’s plight in sanitation has not improved much since ages.
Pixabay

“Today, schools have separate toilets for girls and boys and the issue of menstrual hygiene is also being addressed,” he said. “This has happened because of initiatives taken by both the government, the NGOs and other stakeholders.”

Also Read: 3 HIV+ Students Banned From School in Indonesia

Improvement needed

Despite the improvements, more than a third of the girls in South Asia miss school for one to three days a month during their period, WaterAid said, urging greater investment in basic sanitation.

“If we are serious about all children and young people, wherever they are, whatever their gender, physical ability or community background, having their right to clean water and sanitation, we must take decisive and inclusive action now,” said Chief Executive Tim Wainwright. (VOA)