Saturday March 23, 2019

Emotional problems during adolescence can lead to unemployment

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Image source: www.livestrong.com

London: Suffering from emotional problems in adolescence is a key risk factor for future joblessness irrespective of socio-economic background, says a study.

The research found clear evidence that distressed adolescents, who tend to feel nervous or depressed rather than calm or happy, subsequently experienced higher levels of joblessness in early adulthood.

The findings showed that adolescents who were highly distressed at ages 16 to 20 were 32 percent more likely to be unemployed and 26 percent more likely to be unemployed or out of the workforce in early adulthood.

“The findings provide strong evidence that distressed adolescents are vulnerable to unemployment and suggest that this vulnerability increased during the recent difficult economic period following the Great Recession,” said lead researcher Mark Egan from University of Stirling in Britain.

The study, published in the journal Social Science & Medicine, examined the employment patterns of over 7,000 Americans over a 12-year period, born in the period 1980-1984.

The findings revealed that the adverse impact of psychological distress on job prospects grew in the years following the 2007-2009 Great Recession where those with a history of distress experienced a pronounced rise in joblessness.

The trends held even when comparing distressed to non-distressed siblings, suggesting that emotional problems carry a heavy penalty even among brothers and sisters from the same background.

Economic benefits could be gained by treating mental health issues in early life and the researchers called for investment in this area.

“Investing in childhood and adolescent mental health services could have economic benefits including reducing population-level unemployment,” Egan noted.

Credits: IANS

  • Shriya Katoch

    Its time teenage problems are tended to seriously and not viewed as teenage antics.

  • a

    Absolutely correct Shriya ! Kids are growing up way too fast these days and internet in every hand has created havoc in the lives of youngsters. Serious thought must be given in India to finding ways to restrict internet use below the age of 21.

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Childhood Maltreatment Strongest Risk Factor for Depression in Adulthood: Lancet

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome

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depression
Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression. Pixabay

Facing trauma in childhood can significantly change the structure of the brain, which may result in severe depression which could even be recurrent in adulthood, say researchers.

The results from MRI scan images suggest that both childhood maltreatment and recurring depression are associated with similar reductions in the surface area of the insular cortex, part of the brain that regulates emotion and self-awareness.

This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, which found childhood maltreatment one of the strongest risk factors for major depression in adulthood.

depression
Depression is among the leading causes of disability in the U.S. and is being closely monitored by health authorities amid rising suicides nationwide. Pixabay

“Given the impact of the insular cortex on brain functions such as emotional awareness, it’s possible that the changes we saw make patients less responsive to conventional treatments,” said lead researcher Nils Opel from the University of Munster in Germany.

The study included 110 patients aged 18 to 60 years. Of the 75 patients who experienced a relapse, 48 had experienced one additional episode, seven reported two episodes, and six experienced three episodes.

Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression.

depression
This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. Pixabay

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The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome.

Future psychiatric research should therefore explore how the findings could be translated into special attention, care and treatment that could improve patient outcomes, the study noted. (IANS)