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Employees at Facebook Looking For Better Opportunities in Future

According to the report, Facebook's "difficult year is taking a toll on employee morale, with several key measures of internal sentiment taking a sharp turn for the worse over the past year"

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Facebook staring at bigger problems this year, warns analyst. VOA

Many employees of Facebook are looking for better opportunities as scrutiny of the company’s conduct rises following several cases of data leak and as its stock price take a beating, CNBC reported.

Facebook employees are contacting former colleagues to look for jobs outside the company, said the report on Monday.

At least six former Facebook employees told CNBC that they have started receiving an increasing number of calls from current employees of the social network to inquire about job references.

While common at other places, this type of behaviour is unusual for employees of Facebook, which had been known around Silicon Valley as the company that no one leaves, the report said.

While there is no firm data showing a significant rise in departures or employee dissatisfaction, a former Facebook director believes that attrition rate at Facebook might have risen this year.

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Facebook may see higher attrition rate in coming days. VOA

According to a report in the Wall Street Journal last month citing an internal survey at Facebook, just over half of Facebook employees (52 per cent) said they were optimistic about the future of the social networking platform — down by 32 per cent last year.

Only 53 per cent of Facebook employees said the company was making the world better, which is 19 per cent lower than last year.

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According to the report, Facebook’s “difficult year is taking a toll on employee morale, with several key measures of internal sentiment taking a sharp turn for the worse over the past year”.

A Facebook spokesperson was quoted as saying: “It has been a difficult period, but every day we see people pulling together to learn the lessons of the past year and build a stronger company.” (IANS)

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Mothers Find Gaps in Accessibility of Breastfeeding Resources at Work: Research

Mothers still face barriers to breastfeed at work

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The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers. Pixabay

Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, says a new health research.

The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers.

“We know that there are benefits of breastfeeding for both the mother and the infant, and we know that returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation,” said study lead author Rachel McCardel from University of Georgia in US.

“There is a collective experience that we wanted to explore and learn how can we make this better,” McCardel added.

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Returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation. Pixabay

For the findings, research team specifically wanted to better understand breastfeed support in the workplace since US federal guidelines went into place over a decade ago requiring employers to provide unpaid break time and a space other than a restroom for employees to be able to express breast milk.

For their study, the research team surveyed female employees who performed a variety of jobs.

In addition to asking questions about their access to breast feed resources like private rooms, breast pumps and lactation consultants, the respondents were also asked about their experiences with combining breastfeeding and work.

They found that most respondents, nearly 80 per cent, had a private space at work to express milk, and around two-thirds of the women reported having break times to breastfeed.

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Access to other resources like lactation consultants or breast pumps was less common.

According to the study, many respondents also said they hadn’t expected to get much help from their employers, and there was a general lack of communication about the resources available to them. (IANS)