Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
ians

Sepsis is a syndromic response to infection and is frequently a final common pathway to death from many infectious diseases worldwide.

Sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection, is likely to kill more people by 2050 than cancer and heart attacks due to irrational use of antibiotics, said doctors and health experts here. Sepsis is a syndromic response to infection and is frequently a final common pathway to death from many infectious diseases worldwide, according to the World Health Organization.

A study published in the Lancet journal showed that in 2017 there were 48.9 million cases and 11 million sepsis-related deaths worldwide, accounting for nearly 20 per cent of all global deaths. The study also revealed that India has a higher death rate from sepsis, a life-threatening organ dysfunction response to infections, than other South Asian countries except Afghanistan.

"Sepsis will kill more people than cancer or heart attack by 2050 -- it is going to be the biggest killer. Also in developing countries like India, multi-drug resistance due to gross overuse of antibiotics is probably causing a higher mortality," said Yatin Mehta, Chairman, Institute of Critical Care and Anaesthesiology, Medanta -- The Medicity, Gurugram.

This is because sepsis can be caused by many common diseases such as dengue, malaria, UTIs or even diarrhoea. Mehta was speaking at the recently held Sepsis Summit India 2021, organised by the health awareness institution -- Integrated Health and Wellbeing (IHW) Council. Besides the use of antibiotics, the experts also noted the lack of awareness and early diagnosis. They called for increasing awareness and education regarding sepsis at the ground level.

Sepsis can be caused by many common diseases such as dengue, malaria, UTIs or even diarrhoea. Photo by engin akyurt on Unsplash



"Despite advancement in medicine, tertiary care hospitals see 50-60 per cent patients getting sepsis and septic shock. Awareness, and early diagnosis are needed, and unnecessary antibiotic therapy should be avoided," Mehta said.

"Sepsis has not been given the recognition it deserves and this is very much on the backburner from the policy point of view. We need to have Standard Operating Procedures and we need to flag sepsis cases in researches by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), continuing medical education (CME), and it should be taken up on priority by policymakers," added Lov Verma, former Union Health Secretary of Health, Indian government.

While it is a leading cause of death in newborns and pregnant women, sepsis also affects older adults, patients in intensive care units, and people living with HIV/AIDS, liver cirrhosis, cancer, kidney disease, and autoimmune diseases.

It also played a major role in most of the deaths caused by dysregulated immune response during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, the experts said.

"Unless we educate and aware the masses, sepsis will remain an enigma. Recently, the Paediatric Association of India has adopted a slogan called AAA -- 'Avoid Antibiotic Abuse', as antibiotics are prescribed too much in India. Nearly 54 per cent of newborns in India die of sepsis which is worse than Africa. We need a three-pronged approach -- primary prevention, secondary prevention and education and awareness," said Kishore Kumar, Founder and Chairman, Cloudnine Group of Hospitals.(IANS/HP)



Keywords: Sepsis, Infectious diseases, Standard Operating Procedures, Indian Council of Medical Research, HIV/AIDS, Organ dysfunction.


Popular

wikimedia commons

Mortgage loan graph

By- Blogger Indifi

EMI is known as equated monthly installments. It is a fixed payment made by the borrower each month to repay the loan amount. The EMI is divided into two loan components. One is the principal amount, and the second is the interest amount. Whether you are applying for a personal loan, business loan, home loan, car loan, or education loan, EMIs are easy to calculate using the EMI loan calculator.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Flickr.

Swastika, one of the sacred symbols used by many religions like Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism.

The symbol of Swastika is known to signify peace, prosperity, and good fortune in the religious cultures of Eurasia. In fact, this symbol is considered very significant in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. But, at the same time, it has become one of the most misunderstood religious symbols and has been globally banned in many countries.

The reason why the symbol of Swastika is banned in many countries is because of its association with Adolf Hitler's extreme political ideology, Nazism, as Swastika as its official symbol.

Keep Reading Show less
Pixabay

Since emerging into the public eye with a historic gold medal at the junior world championships in 2016, he has maintained a high level of performance

India celebrated a historic day on August 7, as 23-year-old Neeraj Chopra became the first Indian to win an Olympic gold medal in athletics. In the men's javelin throw event, he achieved his greatest triumph, throwing the javelin 87.58 meters on his second try.

Neeraj Chopra was born on December 24, 1997, in Khandra village in Haryana's Panipat district. He grew up in a Haryanavi family of farmers. He is the brother of two sisters. He graduated from Dayanand Anglo-Vedic College in Chandigarh and is now enrolled in Lovely Professional University in Jalandhar, Punjab, pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree. Chopra was bullied due to his obesity as a kid, which prompted his father to enroll him in a nearby gym. He then joined a gym in Panipat, where Jaiveer Choudhary, a javelin thrower, noticed his potential and coached him. When the 13-year-old Chopra finished training under Jaiveer for a year, he was enrolled at the Tau Devi Lal Sports Complex in Panchkula, where he began training under coach Naseem Ahmed.

Keep reading... Show less