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Google has said it uses data to better its services and that users can manage, delete and transfer their data at any time. Pixabay

EU antitrust regulators are investigating collection of data by Google, the European Commission told Reuters Saturday, suggesting the world’s most popular internet search engine remains in its sights despite record fines in recent years.

Competition enforcers on both sides of the Atlantic are now looking into how dominant tech companies use and monetize data.


The EU executive said it was seeking information on how and why Alphabet unit Google is collecting data, confirming a Reuters story Friday.

“The Commission has sent out questionnaires as part of a preliminary investigation into Google’s practices relating to Google’s collection and use of data. The preliminary investigation is ongoing,” the EU regulator told Reuters in an email.


EU antitrust regulators are investigating collection of data by Google, the European Commission told Reuters Saturday, suggesting the world’s most popular internet search engine remains in its sights despite record fines in recent years. VOA

A document seen by Reuters shows the EU’s focus is on data related to local search services, online advertising, online ad targeting services, login services, web browsers and others.

European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager has handed down fines totaling more than 8 billion euros to Google in the last two years and ordered it to change its business practices.

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Google has said it uses data to better its services and that users can manage, delete and transfer their data at any time. (VOA)


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