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EU observers call for more transparency in Lankan polls

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NewsGram Staff Writer

Colombo:  European Union (EU) election observers on Saturday called for more transparency in Sri Lanka’s electoral process and suggested a few measures for credible and acceptable elections in future.

Releasing the final report here on the August 17 Parliamentary Elections, Chief Observer Cristian Preda highlighted that electoral laws in Sri Lanka could be reviewed to allow direct campaigning, to develop parties finance rules to ensure a level field between candidates and to require that the parties nominate candidates for national list seats before elections, so that voters can anticipate the result of their votes, reported Xinhua.

Preda also underlined the need to introduce temporary special measures to increase the representation of women in politics and in key positions in the public sector.

“The elections were well-administered and offered voters a genuine choice from among a broad range of political alternatives; and, according to most interlocutors, these were the most peaceful and efficiently conducted elections in the country’s recent history,” he said.

The final report by the EU contains a detailed analysis of the electoral process in the light of international standards for democratic elections and the Sri Lankan law.

It also includes a total of 26 recommendations for future elections in the areas of the legal framework, electoral administration, voter registration, campaign environment, complaints and appeals, gender equality, media, voter education and election observation.

Furthermore, it points out the necessity of including in the legal framework the right of domestic and international observers to observe all stages of the electoral process.

(With inputs from IANS)

 

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  • s singh

    EU are more interested in Sri Lanka only for cultural purposes,let them leave the country

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Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study

Bangladeshis in Britain also reached puberty at a younger age and were taller than men who lived in Bangladesh throughout their childhood

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Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study
Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study. (IANS)

Men who grew up in challenging conditions like prevalence of infectious diseases or poor nutrition may have lower levels of testosterone — male sex hormone — in later life, says a study.

The findings suggest that the differences may be linked to energy investment. For instance, in environments where people are more exposed to disease or poor nutrition, developing males direct their energy towards survival at the cost of testosterone.

While high testosterone levels may up the risk of ageing, muscle mass, prostate enlargement and cancer, lower levels may cause lack of energy, erectile dysfunction etc. Thus, the researchers suggest that any screening for risk profiles may need to take a man’s childhood environment into account.

“Very high and very low testosterone levels can have implications for men’s health and it could be important to know more about men’s childhood circumstances to build a fuller picture of their risk factors for certain conditions or diseases,” said Gillian Bentley from Britain’s Durham University.

testosterone
Representational image.

For the study, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the team collected data from 359 men born and still resident in Bangladesh; Bangladeshi men who moved to London as children; Bangladeshi men who moved to London as adults; second-generation, Britain born men whose parents were Bangladeshi migrants; and Britain born ethnic Europeans.

The results showed that Bangladeshi men who grew up and lived as adults in Britain had significantly higher levels of testosterone compared to relatively well-off men who grew up and lived in Bangladesh as adults.

Also Read: Attractiveness in Males is Not Associated With Female’s Hormone Levels, says Study

Bangladeshis in Britain also reached puberty at a younger age and were taller than men who lived in Bangladesh throughout their childhood.

Further, it was also found that the aspects of male reproductive function remain changeable up to the age of 19 and are more flexible in early rather than late childhood, but no longer heavily influenced by their surroundings. (IANS)