Friday August 17, 2018

Even eating pulses can help you shed a bit of weight

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Toronto: A source of protein for the poor and rich alike, just one serving of pulses daily can also contribute to modest weight loss, reveals a study.

According to researchers, consuming 3/4 cup (130 grams) a day of beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils led to a weight loss of 0.34 kgs or 340 grams in over six weeks.

Despite their known health benefits, not many people eat pulses on any given day and most do not eat the full serving.

“So there is room for most of us to incorporate dietary pulses in our diet and realize potential weight management benefits,” said lead author Russell de Souza from St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.

Pulses have a low glycemic index — meaning that they are foods that break down slowly — and can be used to reduce or displace animal protein as well as “bad” fats such as trans-fat in a dish or meal.

The study analysed 940 participants who lost an average of 0.34 kg over six weeks with the addition of a single serving of pulses to the diet — and without making a particular effort to reduce other foods.

The new study fits well with previous work which found that pulses increased the feeling of fullness by 31 percent which may indeed result in less food intake.

“Though the weight loss was small, our findings suggest that simply including pulses in your diet may help you lose weight and we think more importantly, prevent you from gaining it back after you lose it,” de Souza noted.

Knowing which foods make people feel fuller longer may help them lose weight and keep it off.

“So eating more pulses means, being more sustainable and receiving many health benefits,” he said.

Next Story

Gaining Weight After Quitting Cigrattes, Still Better In the Long Run: Study

Regardless of the amount of weight gain, quitters always have a lower risk of dying'' prematurely.

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Compared with smokers, even quitters who gained the most weight had at least a 50 percent lower risk of dying prematurely from heart disease and other causes, a Harvard-led study has found. VOA

If you quit smoking cigrattes and gain weight, it may seem like you’re trading one set of health problems for another. But a new U.S. study finds you’re still better off in the long run.

Compared with smokers, even the quitters who gained the most weight had at least a 50 percent lower risk of dying prematurely from heart disease and other causes, the Harvard-led study found.

The study is impressive in its size and scope and should put to rest any myth that there are prohibitive weight-related health consequences to quitting cigarettes, said Dr. William Dietz, a public health expert at George Washington University.

“The paper makes pretty clear that your health improves, even if you gain weight,” said Dietz, who was not involved in the research. “I don’t think we knew that with the assurance that this paper provides.”

The New England Journal of Medicine published the study Wednesday. The journal also published a Swedish study that found quitting smoking seems to be the best thing diabetics can do to cut their risk of dying prematurely.

cigarette
Your health improves, even if you gain weight. Pixabay

10 pounds or more

The nicotine in cigarettes can suppress appetite and boost metabolism. Many smokers who quit and don’t step up their exercise find they eat more and gain weight — typically less than 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms), but in some cases three times that much.

A lot of weight gain is a cause of the most common form of diabetes, a disease in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Diabetes can lead to problems including blindness, nerve damage, heart and kidney disease, and poor blood flow to the legs and feet.

In the U.S. study, researchers tracked more than 170,000 men and women over roughly 20 years, looking at what they said in health questionnaires given every two years.

The people enrolled in the studies were all health professionals, and did not mirror current smokers in the general population, who are disproportionately low-income, less educated and more likely to smoke heavily.

The researchers checked which study participants quit smoking and followed whether they gained weight and developed diabetes, heart disease or other conditions.

Weight, Cigrattes
Quitters saw their risk of diabetes increase by 22 percent in the six years after they kicked the habit. Pixabay

Quitters saw their risk of diabetes increase by 22 percent in the six years after they kicked the habit. An editorial in the journal characterized it as “a mild elevation” in the diabetes risk.

Studies previously showed that people who quit have an elevated risk of developing diabetes, said Dr. Qi Sun, one the study’s authors. He is a researcher at the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Also Read: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes With the Help of Weight Loss

But that risk doesn’t endure, and it never leads to a higher premature death rate than what smokers face, he said.

“Regardless of the amount of weight gain, quitters always have a lower risk of dying” prematurely, Sun said. (VOA)