Even eating pulses can help you shed a bit of weight

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Toronto: A source of protein for the poor and rich alike, just one serving of pulses daily can also contribute to modest weight loss, reveals a study.

According to researchers, consuming 3/4 cup (130 grams) a day of beans, peas, chickpeas or lentils led to a weight loss of 0.34 kgs or 340 grams in over six weeks.

Despite their known health benefits, not many people eat pulses on any given day and most do not eat the full serving.

“So there is room for most of us to incorporate dietary pulses in our diet and realize potential weight management benefits,” said lead author Russell de Souza from St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.

Pulses have a low glycemic index — meaning that they are foods that break down slowly — and can be used to reduce or displace animal protein as well as “bad” fats such as trans-fat in a dish or meal.

The study analysed 940 participants who lost an average of 0.34 kg over six weeks with the addition of a single serving of pulses to the diet — and without making a particular effort to reduce other foods.

The new study fits well with previous work which found that pulses increased the feeling of fullness by 31 percent which may indeed result in less food intake.

“Though the weight loss was small, our findings suggest that simply including pulses in your diet may help you lose weight and we think more importantly, prevent you from gaining it back after you lose it,” de Souza noted.

Knowing which foods make people feel fuller longer may help them lose weight and keep it off.

“So eating more pulses means, being more sustainable and receiving many health benefits,” he said.

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Here’s How You Can Tackle Obesity And Stay Healthy During Lockdown

One needs to maintain good health during the time of lockdown

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Here's how you can deal with obesity during lockdown. Pixabay

The pandemic has contributed to an increase in obesity rates as weight loss programmes (which are often delivered in groups) and referred interventions such as surgery are being severely curtailed. We bring to you some Health Tips-

Importantly, the current crisis and the need for self-isolation is prompting many to rely on processed food with longer shelf life (instead of fresh produce) and canned food (with higher quantities of sodium). One might notice an increase in weight if this pattern of lifestyle persists for a longer period of time.

So what should a person do to stay healthy and make one stronger in these times? Dr Sharad Sharma, Laparoscopic and Bariatric Surgeon, Hiranandani Hospital, Vashi gives a few recommendations:

Proper nutrition and hydration are vital

Those who consume a well-balanced diet are healthier and are able to build stronger immune system. A healthy diet limits the risk of chronic illnesses and infectious diseases

It is recommended to eat a variety of fresh and unprocessed foods every day to accomplish the body’s requirement of necessary Vitamins, Minerals, Dietary Fiber, Proteins and Antioxidants

Consume whole grains and legumes – this also reduces the risk of Diabetes

Drink ample water � at least 5 liters per day

Avoid sugar, fat and salt to significantly lower your risk of being overweight, and obese

Do not consume sugar-sweetened beverages & limit intake of oily food

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One should avoid sitting for a long time and in every 20 minutes, move around for 3-5 minutes. Pixabay

Staying active

While the stay at home order has restricted our outdoor movements, it is important for people of all ages and abilities to be as active as possible.

Avoid sitting or slouching all the time

Every 20 minutes, move around for 3-5 minutes; walk or stretch-this will help reduce the strain on a muscle, relieve any form of mental tension and will help circulate blood to the body.

Read More: Understand Your Kids’ Perspective to Make Them Exercise

Muscle activity increases if you are physically active, reducing the risk of speedy weight gain.

More vigorous free exercises are also great ways to remain active at home.

In current times focusing on good health, food habits and maintaining some level of physical activity will go a long way in warding off obesity. (IANS)

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Find Out Why You Need Pulses and Legumes in Your Diet

Power up your diet with pulses and legumes

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pulses legumes
Pulses and legumes are a highly nutritious and sustainable food source packed with proteins, fiber, and other micronutrients. Pixabay

BY ADITI ROY

In the current scenario, it has become difficult to source vegetables easily. There is also fear among people about the virus and hence, the consumption of meat, fish and poultry have also greatly reduced. In such times, it has become important for us to consume the dry sources of foods in a way that they help us in providing essential nutrients in our diet.

“Pulses and legumes are a highly nutritious and sustainable food source packed with proteins, fiber, and other micronutrients such as iron and vitamin B. When paired with rice, wheat, or other cereal grains that are high in sulphur-containing amino acids, pulses’ proteins can fulfil the daily essential amino acid requirements without the need for consuming animal proteins and it is an affordable plant protein source. This kind of dietary strategy is called mutual supplementation in which you combine complementary partially complete protein food to supply adequate amounts of all the essential amino acids,” says Pariksha Rao Co-Founder & Chief Nutrition Officer (CNO) LIL’GOODNESS & COOLMEAL.

For example – beans and brown rice, soy curry and rice; milk and oats, curd and rice, etc.

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Pulses are an excellent complementary food for infants and young children to meet their daily nutritional needs. Pixabay

The powerhouse of nutrients:

Pulses typically contain about twice the amount of protein found in whole grain cereals such as wheat, which for most populations in developing countries they constitute a major source of protein. Pulses are an excellent complementary food for infants and young children to meet their daily nutritional needs. They can be incorporated into children’s diets through family diets. Their high nutrient content also makes pulses ideal for vegetarians and vegans to ensure adequate intakes of protein, minerals and vitamins. When combined with food high in vitamin C, pulses’ high iron content makes them a potent food for replenishing iron stores, particularly for women at reproductive age, who are more at risk for iron deficiency anaemia. Older people can also benefit from eating pulse. In today’s COVID-19 pandemic, if one is not able to source fresh vegetables, add a little amla powder or a few drops of lemon juice to the bowl of your dal and enjoy with roti or rice.

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Nutrient-loaded combination of pulses in your daily diet

Add a combination of pulses along with cereals (to get all the essential amino acids). Besides pulses, other sources of legumes (rajma/ kidney beans, chana/chickpeas, lobia/ black eyed peas, cowpea), green peas, soybean, etc. can also be added.

Add roasted chana/ roasted dals/ roasted soy along with seeds cocktail as a protein snack.

Besan and sattu have been an integral part of Indian cooking and perfect sources of pulse protein.

One part soy flour can be added to 3 parts of wheat flour or other cereals while making chapati dough to improve protein content of daily diet.

Preety Tyagi, Lead Health Coach, Celebrity Nutritionist & Founder My22BMI shares some interesting options we can include the legumes in our daily diet.

Use daals, legumes, chickpeas, beans etc. to their maximum capacity as a source of protein, carbs as well as fiber. The whole dals are more rich in nutrient content and should certainly be consumed at least 4 days in a week.

Make use of all the high fiber grains stored in your kitchen pantries. Remember, whole grains are not only rich in Carbs, but are a great source of fiber as well. They have many other vitamins and minerals as well. They are excellent in providing us the much needed energy as well as the nourishment that we need.

Include Quinoa, Amaranth, Rajgira atta, Millets, Buckwheat flour, Sama rice in your diet. These are highly potent, dry sources of nutrition which are safe to be bought, stored and consumed during these times.

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Pulses typically contain about twice the amount of protein found in whole grain cereals such as wheat. Pixabay

Remember, the lentils, beans, chickpeas etc. can be sprouted to enhance their nutritional benefits. Make use of this during these times of need. Make sprouted moong, sprouted kala channa, Sprouted beans etc, These can be used in preparing cheelas, chaats, salads, sauteed salads etc.

Soak the beans, chickpeas, whole lentils for a long period of time before cooking, to make them easy for your digestive system. Especially for people with gut health issues, it is advisable to soak the rajmas, chhole etc for a period of upto 24 hours, while changing water from time to time. It’s very important especially during these times of sedentary lifestyle.

Eat the various nuts and seeds such as almonds, walnuts, cashew nuts, chia seeds, pumpkin seeds, flax seeds etc. These contain essential omega 3 fatty acids and are a great source of essential minerals as well. You could soak these in water as well for a few hours, to aid in easy digestion for your Gut.

Also Read- ICMR Reports Conducting Over a Million COVID-19 Tests

Make use of all the essential nutrition rich spices we have in our kitchens. You can make a kadha using all essential spices to boost your immunity as well. Use turmeric, sauth, black pepper, and cardamom for the same reason. They are not only full of antibacterial antiseptic properties but are highly non inflammatory foods. (IANS)

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Obesity in Kids Linked With High Chances of Fractures: Study

Researchers claim that there are higher chances of having fractures if you are obese in nature.

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There are higher chances of fracturing yourself if you're obese, says researchers. Pixabay

Researchers say that pre-school children who are overweight or obese have a higher risk of bone fractures during childhood than normal-weight pre-schoolers.

The study, published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, aimed to determine if having an overweight or obese range body mass index (BMI) at the time of beginning school is associated with increased fracture incidence in childhood.

“In a cohort of almost half a million children from Catalonia, Spain, we have found a strong association between pre-school overweight/obesity and the risk of fracture during childhood,” said study senior author Daniel Prieto-Alhambra from the University of Oxford in the UK.

According to the researchers, a dynamic cohort was created from children presenting for routine preschool primary care screening, collected in the Information System for Research in Primary Care (SIDIAP) platform in Catalonia, Spain.

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More research is needed to further understand the mechanisms underlying the obesity and fractures. Pixabay

Data were collected from 296 primary care centers representing 74 percent of the regional pediatric population

The study included 466,997 children with weight and height measurements at age four years who were followed for a median of 4.9 years.

The findings showed that fractures occurred in 9.20 percent of underweight, 10.06 percent of normal weight, 11.28 percent of overweight, and 13.05 percent of obese children.

Compared with normal weight, overweight and obesity were linked with 42 percent and 74 percent higher risks of lower limb fractures, respectively, and a 10 percent and 19 percent higher risk of upper limb fractures, respectively.

Also Read: Higher Chance of Child’s Injury Due to Parent’s Mental Illness

Overall, preschool children with an overweight or obese range BMI had increased incidence of upper and lower limb fractures in childhood compared with normal-weight kids.

“More research is needed to further understand the mechanisms underlying this correlation,” Prieto-Alhambra said. (IANS)