Sunday October 21, 2018

Ever wondered How Women are able to read Thoughts just by looking at your Eyes?

For the new study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, the team analysed cognitive empathy in 89,000 people on the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" test

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Women are better at reading mind. Wikimedia
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  • The researchers show that the genetic variants on chromosome 3 in women are associated with their ability to read the mind in the eyes
  • Scientists have built upon a study first performed 20 years ago, called the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” test
  • The results confirmed that women on average do score better on this test because of gene’s influence

London, June 9, 2017: Ever wondered how your wife or partner is able to read your thoughts and emotions just by looking at your eyes? Her ability to interpret may be the result of a gene influence, say researchers, one of Indian-origin.

The findings showed that the genetic variants on chromosome 3 in women are associated with their ability to read the mind in the eyes — known as cognitive empathy.

The closest genes in this tiny stretch of chromosome 3 include LRRN1 (Leucine Rich Neuronal 1) which is highly active in a part of the human brain called the striatum — which has been shown using brain scanning to play a role in cognitive empathy, the researchers said.

“This is an important step forward for the field of social neuroscience and adds one more piece to the puzzle of what may cause variation in cognitive empathy,” said Varun Warrier, doctoral student at the University of Cambridge.

ALSO READ: Pregnancy seems Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors: Study

Scientists have built upon a study first performed 20 years ago, called the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” test.

For the new study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, the team analysed cognitive empathy in 89,000 people on this test.

The results confirmed that women on average do score better on this test because of gene’s influence.

In addition, the researchers found that genetic variants that contribute to higher scores in the test also increase the risk of anorexia, but not autism, the researchers noted.

“We are excited by this new discovery, and are now testing if the results replicate, and exploring precisely what these genetic variants do in the brain, to give rise to individual differences in cognitive empathy,” explained Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor at the University of Cambridge. (IANS)

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Family Size Can Be Determined By Reproductive Rights: Study

To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care

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A community health worker holds up contraceptives during a lecture on family planning at a reproductive health clinic run by an NGO in Tondo city, metro Manila. VOA

Family size is closely linked to reproductive rights, according to the State of World Population 2018 report.

The U.N. report says people in developed countries tend to have lower fertility rates because of greater access to family planning services, modern contraceptives and age-appropriate sex education.

The director of the U.N. Population Fund office in Geneva, Monica Ferro, says in places where reproductive rights are constrained, either due to lack of resources or government mandates, people have a limited ability to choose the size of their families.

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Google suspends Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Ads, VOA

“Many sub-Saharan African countries, for example, have fertility rates of four or more births per woman,” Ferro said. “At the other end of the spectrum, you have some eastern Asian and European countries with fewer than two births per women. In both cases, individuals face obstacles to the full realization of their reproductive rights.”

The world population is expected to increase by 2.5 billion by 2050, to nearly 10 billion people, with sub-Saharan Africa expected to contribute more than half of that growth.

Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility, Ferro said.

reproductive rights
Women in Africa must overcome many legal and social barriers to achieve control of their fertility.

“Women may not have the access to medical services,” she told VOA. “They may not have the access to child care. They may not have access to all the institutional and social support that comes with being ready or being able to plan your fertility.”

Also Read: Brisbane, Australia Protests Against Plans To Decriminalise Abortion

To make freedom of choice a reality, the report urges countries to offer universal access to quality reproductive health care, including modern contraceptives and better education.

It also advocates for a change in men’s attitudes toward a woman’s right to choose the number, timing and spacing of children. (VOA)