Wednesday November 20, 2019

Excessive Hygiene Can Cause Antibiotic Resistance, Says Study

Hence, the results indicated that a stable microbial diversity in clinical areas counteracts the spread of resistances

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The study found that between 2000 and 2010, the consumption of antibiotics increased globally from 50 billion to 70 billion standard units.
The study found that between 2000 and 2010, the consumption of antibiotics increased globally from 50 billion to 70 billion standard units. (IANS)

While maintaining hygiene is good for health, excess cleanliness could lead to antibiotic resistance often resulting to death and illness as well, suggests a new study.

Comparing all existing microorganisms and antibiotic resistances, the researchers at Austria’s University of Graz, showed that microbial diversity decreases in areas with high levels of hygiene and the diversity of resistances increases.

The team compared the intensive care unit of the institute with clean rooms subject to strong microbial control in the aerospace industry and with public and private buildings which have hardly any microbial controls.

“In environments with strong microbial control in the intensive care unit and industrially used clean rooms, there are increasing antibiotic resistances which show a high potential for combining with pathogens,” said Alexander Mahnert, director at the varsity.

Antibiotics were nearly always given before surgery to prevent infection. Wikimedia Commons
Antibiotics were nearly always given before surgery to prevent infection. Wikimedia Commons

The number of people who become ill and die from antibiotic-resistant germs is increasing worldwide, said the study, published in Nature Communications.

Hence, the results indicated that a stable microbial diversity in clinical areas counteracts the spread of resistances.

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With the microbial control of pathogens already being used in cultivated plants and also in humans in the framework of stool transplantation, pursuing such ideas in indoor areas in future is recommended, said Gabriele Berg from the varsity.

The team suggested regular airing, houseplants, deliberate use of useful microorganisms and reduction of antibacterial cleaning agents could be the strategies in maintaining or improving microbial diversity. (IANS)

Next Story

IITians Develop Affordable and Easy to Use Products to Help Boost Woman Hygiene

Set up about a year ago by Archit Agarwal and Harry Sehrawat, both students of IIT-Delhi, it has touched the Rs 1 crore revenue mark

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Products, Woman, Hygiene
One of such efforts is a startup named Sanfe. Pixabay

If you thought startups are all about technology, IITians are out to redefine that, smash taboos and create awareness around issues, like women hygiene, in their own innovative manner and ways.

One of such efforts is a startup named Sanfe. Set up about a year ago by Archit Agarwal and Harry Sehrawat, both students of IIT-Delhi, it has touched the Rs 1 crore revenue mark as per their claims.

On a trip to mountains, one of their female friends contracted urinary tract infection after using a dirty public washroom. It pushed them on the path of thinking and they realised over 50 per cent of Indian women face this kind of problem.

They decided to develop a device, which could be affordable and also easy to use. And thus came the ‘Stand and pee’. Priced at Rs 10 a piece, the device has registered good online sales.

Products, Woman, Hygiene
If you thought startups are all about technology, IITians are out to redefine that, smash taboos and create awareness around issues, like women hygiene, in their own innovative manner and ways. Pixabay

They also developed a special oil for women to get relief from period pain. According to them, relief roll on helps in immediate and long-lasting relaxation from period pain.

“The initial plan was to create a product to help women avoid dirty public washrooms. Later, we realised that there are lot of things that must be done to improve the state of female hygiene in India,” Sehrawat told IANS.

Another product that has been trying to bring a change in the society is an affordable device, developed by two students of IIT-Bombay and IIT-Goa. It helps clean reusable sanitary pads.

Devyani Maladkar (IIT-Goa) and Aishwarya Agarwal (IIT-Bombay) set up Cleanse Right to address the growing threat of menstrual waste to environment and public health. They invented an inexpensive and affordable device to clean reusable sanitary pads. It costs around Rs 1,500.

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“The machine has been designed in such a way that it rubs the cotton sanitary pads clean like human hands in a hygienic manner,” Aishwarya told IANS.

Both Sanfe and Cleanse Right are in the process of getting their inventions patented. However, while Sanfe has already hit the market with its products, the invention by Aishwarya and Devyani will have to wait for 2-3 years to be available commercially. (IANS)