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Exclusive: Fiji Actor Vishaarad Sharan talks about his connection to India and Love for Bollywood

The actor acquainted NewsGram with the Indian diaspora one finds in Fiji

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Vishaarad Sharan. Image source: Facebook

Not many know that besides being an actor and a model, Vishaarad Sharan is also a Social-activist. Fiji-born Vishaarad is of Indian descent, belonging to the North-Indian diaspora residing in Fiji,  and has also been a part of movie “3G- A Killer Connection” starring Neil Nitin Mukesh and Sonal Chauhan, where he performed the negative role of ‘Jaden’. To talk of him, only in terms of acting in a Bollywood movie, confines his multi-skilled personality. Apart from love for Bollywood, he has deep interest in the diversities of Indian culture and Hindu religion in particular. In an exclusive interview with reporter Megha Sharma of NewsGram , Vishaarad Sharan speaks his heart out on Bollywood and his connection to India. We cover this article under the series mitti_kiKhusboo (the smell of the Motherland) under Indian Diaspora category.

ALSO WATCH: Vishaarad’s ( as Jaden) role from the movie ‘3G- A Killer Connection’ 

‘Back in 1879, when the British took in the ‘indentured laborers’ from across the whole of India, a large section of the population were transported to the islands of Fiji. And from there the journey started, eventually developing into a new cultural and ethnic evolution of the Indo-Fijians.’ Fiji has been a country which accepted the Indian culture and its people with open arms. The actor told us about how Indian immigrants spend their lives in Fiji. This diasporic eye gave us an interesting insight into the lively cultural practices and an eternal bondage shared by them.

MEGHA SHARMA (MS): It was the first time you worked in Bollywood. Can you tell us about your experience?

VISHAARAD SHARAN (VS): I have worked in movies even before. Here, in Fiji we have some directors who make Hindi movies and I did get some roles in them. I got negative roles only and it was a great experience to see how the Hindi film Industry works in India.

MS: What differences did you find in the local Fiji movies made in Hindi and the ones in Bollywood?

VS: The Hindi movies made in Fiji are low-budget and also lack skillful actors. People are limited in the resources when it comes to movie-making. The movies have a limited audience and are not explored globally. As far as the differences are concerned, there is definitely an attempt to imitate the Bollywood style. We have movies like “Chatai Kaha Bichau” (where do I lay the mat) which was shot a year before “3G” and includes songs.

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MS: In an interview elsewhere, you have stated how co-actor, Neil Nitin Mukesh, described to you the ways to appear and about your style. So before this, did you go through any professional training or did you attend some workshops for your professional development?

VS: I never went through any professional training. However, after “3G” I did attend some workshops as I thought of overcoming the lack of professional exposure. When it comes to 3G and Neil Nitin Mukesh, it was very amazing to see him work. He is very serious and sincere towards his work. He was of great significance in bringing about my role. He aided the choreographers while my scenes were being shot. He even lent me his jacket for a scene and choreographed most of the fight scenes. It was very interesting to see how the actors have a say in movie-making. They too become a part of the movie and work for a productive outcome.

MS: What makes you connected to India even while being born in Fiji?

VS: Personally, I feel a very strong connection to India. Even when people look at me they do see Indian looks and identify with me.

(As the interviewer saw him talking in a Hindi accent, she asked)

MS: Hindi? Where did that come from? Feels like you are indigenous to the language. Would like to explain that?

VS: I am a 4th generation (from my mother’s side) and 5th generation (from my father’s side) Indian. I have been brought up in an Indian culture and never found it away from me. My parents speak Hindi. However, Hindi here is different from the Hindi spoken in India. Here, we have a mixed version of Hindi with Bhojpuri and Awadhi.

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MS: Was your schooling in Hindi in Fiji? Are there institutions that recognize Hindi as a language and what do people think of it?

VS: Hindi is a compulsory language for primary classes in many schools here. A child reads and writes it till the primary classes and after that, it is provided as an optional language. The interest in Hindi has regrown and it’s very interesting that if two Indians start talking randomly, they end up talking in Hindi only. So the Hindi-connection, whether it is orally transmitted or being studied, it can be widely seen among Indians residing here. The masses are interested in taking admissions and learning the language. Even I studied Hindi.

MS: What are other traditional identifications that you feel are very prominent?

VS: There is no one strand of which I can talk. It is being practiced in each household bearing an Indian identity. I would like to tell here that the love towards India however, has regrown after Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited Fiji in 2014. People did understand that they are being recognized as they saw him coming here and meeting the diaspora.

MS: Which Indian communities manifest themselves as a face of the Indian diaspora? Do we find the same enthusiasm in celebrating festivals as in India? 

VS: We have a number of North Indian communities who came under the British Indenture. They are accompanied by many Gujarati and Sikh communities too who came as free Indian as opposed to the Indentured ones. It cannot be same but people are enthusiastic when it comes to celebrating festivals. Navratri is the most celebrated one. There is the same 9 days long worshiping of the goddess.

Holi is also very popular with singing Holi folk songs, eating sweets and coloring each other. Its celebration declined in past 15 years but for last 2-3 years, there is again the same colorful approach. It is also because of the commercialization and sponsorship in the urban areas. Diwali is also observed in the same way, with cleaning up houses and lightening them on the day of Laxmi pujan. There is also a South-Indian fire-walking festival which goes on for a week or two and is witnessed by over a thousand of people.

vishaarad sharan
The fire walking festival fiji. Image Source: youtube.com

MS: India is a land with different flavors of food. What about Indian cuisines in Fiji?

VS: Indian food is very famous here. Gujarati came here for over 2-3 generations ago. They still prefer speaking in their regional language, at home or at their temples, and eating Indian cuisines. We have many restaurants specialized in Gujarati, Punjabi and South-Indian food. Like we have the ‘Maya Dhaba’, which is a Punjabi food restaurant, and also street stalls and vendors selling ‘dosas’, ‘Dhokla’ and many other Indian dishes.

I myself have three temples nearby my house. One is Kabir Mandir, there is a Gurudwara and also a South-Indian temple. There are regular ‘kirtans’ and the Ramayana by Tulsidas is admired a lot. Every Tuesday it is recited at the temples here and most of the Ramayana stories are being told in them.

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MS: Did you get a chance to see all this practiced live by visiting India ?

VS: I visited India for around three weeks in 2010. The visit was very welcoming. I heard people describing it as not so pleasing but I felt at home. I was not able to attend any festive activity but I saw a Marathi cultural fest which was interesting to see. We do not find the tea stalls here as we do India. (He laughs). I plan to visit it again for a scholarship programme in Yoga from SYVASA Yoga University in Bengaluru/Bangalore.

MS: Do you watch Hindi movies and would you like to be a part of Bollywood again?

VS: As a child, I did watch a lot of Hindi movies. The interest lessened with growing age. “Monsoon Wedding” is my favorite movie and I love listening to all the songs composed by A.R. Rahman. I would definitely like to work again in Bollywood movie, if they pay me well (he laughs).

MS: Will you prefer the same negative role? Is there any movie you wish you would have worked in?

VS: I want to do a very negative role and I have always been interested to know what happens behind the camera. I still feel that I must work behind the camera only and learn more professional skills.

For movies, I have always liked all the historical movies as they give a wider awareness of the cultural plurality, India is rich with. “Ashoka” is one movie, I would have liked to work for and even “Baahubali” has an influential story-line. I would have certainly worked for free in “MohenJo Daro”, the upcoming Indian epic. I really have an eye on movies like these.

On asking his views about NewsGram, Visharad says that he appreciates the work that the news portal does and finds the ‘Indian Diaspora’ section quite interesting as he has a sense of belonging towards India. He says he follows NewsGram and loves to browse through the stories published on the portal, for it brings him closer to India.

-by Megha Sharma. Twitter@meghash06510344

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Forks in the Road : 10 places to eat in Delhi

Delhi has so many diverse cuisines to offer. Here is the list of 10 places to eat in delhi which you can not miss

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Foodie Delhi
10 places to eat in Delhi (pexels)

Delhi, the present day cultural hub of India, which was once under the rule of The Parthians, The Turks, The Afghans, The Mughals and The Britishers which left an impact on the city and gave it its own  unique status. Tourists from all over the world come down to Delhi and lose their hearts to it scrumptious cuisines.

It’s winter in Delhi, a perfect weather for sampling Delhi’s most famous attractions- its incredible street food. It’s not just the street food that Delhi is famous for but a lot of history and culture that is mixed up with the food. Everything from Asoka era to Mughals to the invaders who held sway over Delhi to Purana Qila, have left the taste of the food behind.

To the variety of chats that will take you on tour of tangy, sweet and spicy flavours to the non-vegetarian food which will remind of the rich flavours to the food never tasted anywhere, Delhi has it all.

Here are 10 places to visit for indulging into the flavors of Delhi.

  1. Paranthe Wali Gali
IndianGyaan

 

Paranthe Wali Gali since 1870s is the name of a narrow street in the Chandni Chowk area of Delhi known for its series of shops selling parantha, an Indian flatbread. The food is old fashioned, strictly vegetarian and the cooked dishes do not include onion or garlic. Stuffed aloo (potato), Gobi (cauliflower) and matar (peas) paranthas are the most popular ones. Lentil paranthas are also available. The cost could come up to 150 rupees for 2 people. This street is lit from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  1. Dilli Haat
India Opines

Dilli Haat does not only showcase the rich Indian culture and diverse Indian Heritage, but is also one of the best place to enjoy regional food from all over the country. Dilli Haat provides various food stalls having food from various Indian States that gives you a variety of choice at low cost prices. Its timings are from 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bijoli Grill- a West Bengal food stall offering Fish curry and Kosha Mangsho; Momo Mia, an Arunanchal Pradesh food stall offering Momos and Fruit Beer; Nagaland Kitchen, a Nagaland food stall offering Raja Mircha and Momos; Manipur Foods, a Manipuri Food Stall offering Fried Rice, Tarai Tong ad Fruit Beer; Rajasthani Food Stall offering Pyaaz Kachori, Desi Ghee Jalebi and Rajasthani Thali; Maharashtra Food Stall offering Vada Pav, Puran Poli, Shrikhand; Dawath-E-Awadh, a UP Food Stall offering Kebabs, Biryani and Phirni and other food stalls from states such as Andhra Pradesh, Assam and Kerala.

  1. Khan Market
The Urban Escapades

Khan Market is not only a place for die hard shoppers, it is also Delhi’s incredible food districts. A neighborhood that never sleeps, whose streets are filled with the scent of mutton kebab and fried rice. Khan Market has restaurants such as Town Hall Restaurant, The Big Chili Café, Yellow Brick Road Restaurant, Wok in Clouds, The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, Soda bottle opner wala, Azam’s Mughlai, Café Turtle, Omazoni and Market Café.

  1. Spice Aangan
EazyDiner

Tucked away in Safdarjung Development Area’s main market is a hole-in-the-wall tandoor-and-takeaway restaurant known as Spice Aangan. Spice Aangan has been a staple of the SDA market food scene for a while now. The hole-in-the-wall is bang opposite the small, grassless park located at the centre of the market. While there are a couple of steel benches at edge of the park to sit and enjoy their food, it is otherwise a purely takeaway and home delivery outlet. Restaurant serves tandoori snacks–chicken tikka, malai tikka, seekh kebab–as well as mutton dishes, curries, biryani and shawarma rolls. Despite so many options, though, you’d be hard pressed to find the regulars ordering anything other than the chicken shawarma.

  1. Karim’s
Musafir

Karim’s is a historic restaurant located near Jama Masjid Gali Kababian, Old Delhi, Delhi. It is know that this is the best restaurant in Delhi, serving non-vegetarian food since 1913. The original Karim’s is bang opposite Jama Masjid in the walled city area of Delhi. It is close to a market known as Darya Ganj. Those visiting Karim’s for the first time will be surprised at the location. Getting there is not easy, you will need to ask locals for help. Mutton Burra, Mutton Raan-this starter is huge, and is meant for four or five people. There is a wide range of kebabs including Seekh Kebabs, Shammi Kebabs and Mutton Tikka. Chicken Seekh Kebab, Tandoori Chicken or Chicken Tikka for those who love chicken. Mutton Korma, Mutton Stew and Badam Pasanda Chicken Noor Jehan and Chicken Jahangiri are the main courses to be tried once you get there. As for the bread Khamiri Roti is something not to be missed. Karim’s serves two main desserts Kheer Benazir and Shahi Tukda.

  1. Pandara Road
ScoopWhoop

Delhi serves delectable food in almost every nook and corner of the city. Whether it is crowded streets of Chandni Chowk or the sophisticated eateries of Khan Market. One such stop is Pandara Road Market, located near India Gate, the place serves best non-vegetarian food of the city, so all the meat lovers out there fill your wallets. Havemore offering the best Butter chicken and garlic naan and Gulati which is best known for its Dum Biryani and kebabs with the cost price of 1500 rupees for two, and many other restaurants like Chicken Inn, Pindi and Ichiban.

  1. Amar Colony
TripAdvisor

Amar Colony is generally known to be the hub of garments but it is also the hidden street food hub. Home to a diverse population from India, Africa and Afghanistan, there is no doubt, diversity in food here too. A number of small joints for street food in Amar Colony exist which serve the most delicious dishes for you. Most of the shops are situated in the main market and are close to each other. Nagpal Chole Bhature, Hunger Strike, Tibb’s Frankie, Biryani Corner, 34 Chowringhee Lane, Sharma Chaat Bhandar, Deepaul’s Café, Dolma Aunty Momos, Muttu South Indian Anna, High On Burger are the best places to visit when on Pandara Road.

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  1. Hudson Lane, GTB Nagar
MY APRON DIARIES – WordPress.com

Hudson Lane, very close to the main North Campus area, is one place where you will find one of the finest cafés and best restaurants in Delhi. Mostly serving Italian, Café, and Fast Food Cuisine, these quirky joints offer an amazing culinary experience at an extremely pocket-friendly price. Woodbox Café, Mad Monkey, Indus Flavors, QD’s, Ricos and Big yellow Door are the most recommended places to munch at.

  1. Jung Bahadur Kachori Wala
Delhipedia

Situated near Paranthe Wali Gal, Jung Bahadur Kachori Wala is a small but popular street stall that’s been serving sought- after Kachoris since the early 1970s. Kachori stuffed with urad dal and served with special spicy chutney is a must try ther.

  1. Connaught Place
India Today – India Today Group

From fancy revolving restaurants to the delicious local rajma chawal, Connaught place does not discriminate when it comes to food. Home to some of the best restaurants in Delhii and also ironic dahbas, one can relish all kinds of cuisines here be it local, regional or international. Kake Da Hotel, Parikrama, Jain Chawal Wale, Minar and much more are the places to step up with.

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Ethnic Indian Jai Sears responds to complaint against the statue of Gandhi in Grenada

Jai Sears wrote in response to a letter on Mahatma Gandhi entitled “Dustbin of history” written by Josiah Rougier

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Gandhi
Mahatama Gandhi, leader of non violence

Jai Sears from Grenada, Caribbean has written a letter to editor in response to complaints against the statue of Gandhi in Grenada. Here is the text:

I write in response to a letter on Mahatma Gandhi entitled “Dustbin of history” written by Josiah Rougier and published in the Grenada newspaper, The New Today (Nov 3, 2017). In his letter, Rougier is asking the Government to remove the bust-statue of Gandhi which overlooks Sauteurs Bay in Grenada where East Indians arrived 160 years ago. Rougier’s opinion is based on the false notion that Gandhi was racist because the Mahatma reportedly considered Indians to be superior to black Africans when he referred to the latter as “kaffirs.”

Gandhi was only 27 years old when he made that contextual statement. If Rougier had done his research, he would have found that Nelson Mandela said: “Gandhi must be forgiven for these prejudices in the context of the time and the circumstances.” The quote can be found in “Gandhi the Prisoner” by Nelson Mandela published in 1995. Gandhi was a man; he was not god. And even god made mistakes.

In favour of Mahatama Gandhi
Photo of Jai Sears

Rougier must instead focus on the Gandhi’s vision of non-violent protest and his belief in satyagraha which inspired rebels and revolutionaries around the world. Gandhi’s ideas influenced leaders of the African National Congress and the struggle by Indians and blacks against white apartheid rule in South Africa. From as early as 1956 when he was 27 years old, Martin Luther King, Jr. referred to Gandhi as “the guiding light of our technique of nonviolent social change.”

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Following the success of his boycott, King contemplated traveling to India to deepen his understanding of Gandhian principles. The fact is that Gandhi saw people of all races, castes, colours and creeds as equal which led to his assassination by a Hindu fanatic in 1948. So who is this unknown Josiah Rougier? Is he as illustrious as the great Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King? And is he disagreeing with his possible heroes?

A friend to all.
Jai Sears
Grenada, Caribbean

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5 Events Of November Which Are Ideal For Family Vacations

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Events in November which will give you a vacation mood.
Events in November which will give you a vacation mood. Wikimedia.

As we approach the year’s end, Indians not just bid adieu to their summer outfits but also welcome the festival seasons. October and November are two months in India which are full of cultural events and festivals, which make these months, the ideal time for going on family vacations.

Below are the events of November 2017 which you will regret missing. They are worth the try for family vacations:

1.  Dev Deepavali, Varanasi

family vacations
Representational Image. The ghat of holy city Varanasi. 

Varanasi, the holiest city of India, celebrated Dev Deepavali on Kartik Poornima every year. The festival is celebrated with joy. The ghats of Varanasi are lit with beautiful diyas (earthen lamps). God is believed to have descended to the banks of Ganges, to take a holy dip. The festival will take place on November 3, 2017.

 2. Dharamsala International Film Festival

Filmmaker, cinema buffs or all those people interested in the art of films come together of Dharamsala International Film Festival (DIFF). This film festival will witness filmmakers coming from different regions to show films on various issues- socially relevant, contemporary etc. DIFF will take place from November 2 to November 5. If you are a movie buff, then you should immediately pack your bags and seal a date for attending the festival.

3. Pushkar Camel Fair, Rajasthan

Family vacations
Representational Image. Camel Fair is celebrated in Pushkar. Pixabay

Pushkar Camel fair, a cattle fair, in Pushkar which truly defines the real meaning of culture. The Pushkar Camel Fair has been in tradition for a very long time. The fair attracts a huge crowd every year. One of the most ideal and happy places for family vacations. It will take place between 23rd October to 4th November.

Also Read: 7 Beautiful Places To Visit In North East India

4. NH7 Weekender

The five seasons old Indian multi-city music festival has indeed garnered a lot of attention and love from the musically inclined youngsters across the country. It is a combination of national and international studies coming together. In Meghalaya, the event will take place from October 27 to October 28.

5. Guru Purab

family vacations
Sikhs celebrating Guru Purab. Wikimedia.

Guru Purab, one of the most important festivals for Sikhs. The golden temple celebrates it with a lot of joy. The celebration which Amritsar witnesses at this time are unbelievable. It will take place on November 2017. Golden temple is indeed one of the best places for family vacations.

-by Megha Acharya of NewsGram.  She can be reached at @ImMeghaacharya.