Tuesday June 25, 2019

Exercise Could Reduce Irregular Heart Rate Risk in Obese People: Study

Physical activity can also improve a person's fitness level, and we know that people in good shape have a reduced risk of heart failure

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How exercise can help breast cancer survivors. Pixabay

Atrial fibrillation is a condition that can make your heart race and put you at risk for stroke. But people who are obese are more prone to it and can reduce it if they exercise regularly.

According to a study, people with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 have a significantly higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation than the normal weight individuals.

“People who reported that they didn’t exercise at all had about double the risk of developing fibrillation, when compared to those who were physically active and whose body weight was normal,” said co-author Lars Elnan Garnvik from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s (NTNU).

“However, people who were obese but who exercised a lot limited the increase in risk to no more than approximately 50 per cent. This suggests that physical activity is good for limiting the increased risk of atrial fibrillation in obese people,” Garnvik added.

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Heart Rate. (IANS)

For the study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, the research team involved 43,602 men and women who participated in the study between 2006 and 2008.

Also Read: Exercise Cuts Risk of Chronic Disease in Older Adults

“Physical activity and exercise reduce a lot of the known risk factors for atrial fibrillation, like high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol and chronic inflammation,” said co-author Lars Elnan Garnvik from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

“Physical activity can also improve a person’s fitness level, and we know that people in good shape have a reduced risk of heart failure,” Garnvik added. (IANS)

Next Story

Exercising at Home as Fruitful as Gyming

For the study, 32 obese people completed a 12-week exercise programme

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Exercise best defence against deep abdominal belly fat. Pixabay

If you are not finding time to hit the gym, do not worry. Researchers have found that working out at home not only saves your time, cost and access but also increases adherence.

The study, published in The Journal of Physiology, investigated a home-based high-intensity interval training (Home-HIT) programme and studied its benefits for clinically obese individuals with an elevated risk of heart disease.

The research team were interested in whether Home-HIT is a time-efficient strategy that helps to reduce other common exercise barriers such as difficulty with access to exercise facilities due to travel time and cost.

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Researchers have found that working out at home not only saves your time, cost and access but also increases adherence. Pixabay

“An exercise regimen such as Home-HIT that reduces barriers to exercise such as time, cost, and access, and increases adherence in previously inactive individuals gives people a more attainable exercise goal and thus could help improve the health of countless individuals,” said study author Sam Scott from Liverpool John Moores University.

For the study, 32 obese people completed a 12-week exercise programme. A range of health markers were measured in these participants, including body composition, cardiovascular disease risk and the ability to regulate glucose.

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A range of health markers were measured in these participants, including body composition, cardiovascular disease risk and the ability to regulate glucose. Wikimedia Commons

They were categorised in three groups — those who did supervised, lab-based cycling HIT programme; those who did UK government-recommended 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise; and those who did home-based HIT programme of simple body weight exercises suitable for people with low fitness and low mobility and performed without equipment.

ALSO READ: Heartfulness Meditation for Living by Heart

The researchers found that home-based HIT was as effective as both the government-recommended 150-minute exercise and the supervised, lab-based HIT programme for improving fitness in obese individuals. (IANS)