Monday February 18, 2019

Exercise Cuts Risk of Chronic Disease in Older Adults

For the study, the researchers interviewed more than 1,500 Australian adults aged over 50 and followed them over a 10-year period

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Some older adults may not be able to engage in vigorous activity or high levels of physical activity
Some older adults may not be able to engage in vigorous activity or high levels of physical activity. Pixabay

Older adults who exercise above the current recommended levels may have a reduced risk of developing chronic disease as compared to those who do not exercise, a new study has found.

The findings suggested that people who engaged in the highest levels of total physical activity were twice as likely to avoid stroke, heart disease, angina, cancer and diabetes, and be in optimal physical and mental shape 10 years later.

Older adults who did more than 5,000 metabolic equivalent minutes (MET minutes) each week saw the greatest reduction in the risk of chronic disease, suggested the study published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.

“Some older adults may not be able to engage in vigorous activity or high levels of physical activity,” said lead author Bamini Gopinath, Associate Professor at the University of Sydney.

exercise
Old couple running. Pixabay

“But we encourage older adults who are inactive to do some physical activity, and those who currently only engage in moderate exercise to incorporate more vigorous activity where possible,” Gopinath added.

Currently, the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends at least 600 MET minutes of physical activity each week. That is equivalent to 150 minutes of brisk walking or 75 minutes of running, the researchers mentioned.

“Our findings suggest that physical activity levels need to be several times higher than what the WHO currently recommends to significantly reduce the risk of chronic disease,” said Gopinath.

Also Read: Why Exercise on Empty Stomach May Be Better For Your Health

For the study, the researchers interviewed more than 1,500 Australian adults aged over 50 and followed them over a 10-year period.

“Our study showed that high levels of physical activity increase the likelihood of surviving an extra 10 years free from chronic diseases, mental impairment and disability,” Gopinath noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Exercise Can Help Fight Against Deep Abdominal Belly Fat: Study

"Our study suggests that a combination of approaches can help lower visceral fat and potentially prevent these diseases," Neeland added

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exercise everyday
Exercise is crucial for everyone. Pixabay

Exercise can help you in the fight against internal, visceral fat that you cannot see or feel, but can lead to insulin resistance, diabetes, heart disease and inflammation, suggests a study.

In the study, researchers analysed two types of interventions — lifestyle modification (exercise) and pharmacological (medicine) — to learn how best to defeat fight deep abdominal belly fat. They found the reductions were more significant per pound of body weight lost with exercise.

“Visceral fat can affect local organs or the entire body system. Systemically it can affect your heart and liver, as well as abdominal organs,” said Ian J. Neeland, Assistant Professor at the UT Southwestern Medical Centre.

For the study, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the researchers evaluated changes in visceral fat in 3,602 participants over a six-month period measured by a CT or MRI exam.

“When studies use weight or body mass index as a metric, we don’t know if the interventions are reducing fat everywhere in the body, or just near the surface,” Neeland said.

exercising
Exercise best defence against deep abdominal belly fat. Pixabay

“The location and type of fat is important. If you just measure weight or BMI, you can underestimate the benefit to your health of losing weight. Exercise can actually melt visceral fat.”

Neeland noted researchers previously thought of fat as inert storage, but over the years this view evolved and fat is now seen as an active organ.

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“Some people who are obese get heart disease, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome – and others don’t.

“Our study suggests that a combination of approaches can help lower visceral fat and potentially prevent these diseases,” Neeland added. (IANS)