Saturday March 23, 2019

Exercise Can Help Fight Against Deep Abdominal Belly Fat: Study

"Our study suggests that a combination of approaches can help lower visceral fat and potentially prevent these diseases," Neeland added

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exercise everyday
Exercise is crucial for everyone. Pixabay

Exercise can help you in the fight against internal, visceral fat that you cannot see or feel, but can lead to insulin resistance, diabetes, heart disease and inflammation, suggests a study.

In the study, researchers analysed two types of interventions — lifestyle modification (exercise) and pharmacological (medicine) — to learn how best to defeat fight deep abdominal belly fat. They found the reductions were more significant per pound of body weight lost with exercise.

“Visceral fat can affect local organs or the entire body system. Systemically it can affect your heart and liver, as well as abdominal organs,” said Ian J. Neeland, Assistant Professor at the UT Southwestern Medical Centre.

For the study, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the researchers evaluated changes in visceral fat in 3,602 participants over a six-month period measured by a CT or MRI exam.

“When studies use weight or body mass index as a metric, we don’t know if the interventions are reducing fat everywhere in the body, or just near the surface,” Neeland said.

exercising
Exercise best defence against deep abdominal belly fat. Pixabay

“The location and type of fat is important. If you just measure weight or BMI, you can underestimate the benefit to your health of losing weight. Exercise can actually melt visceral fat.”

Neeland noted researchers previously thought of fat as inert storage, but over the years this view evolved and fat is now seen as an active organ.

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“Some people who are obese get heart disease, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome – and others don’t.

“Our study suggests that a combination of approaches can help lower visceral fat and potentially prevent these diseases,” Neeland added. (IANS)

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Exercise May Help You Counter Effects of Jet Lag

For the study, the team examined body clocks following exercise in 101 participants for up to five-and-a-half days

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Representational image.
representational image. Pixabay

Finding it hard to cope with jet lag, shift-based work? Doing some excercise can shift the human body clock and help you adjust to the shifted schedules, suggests new research.

The study, from the Arizona State University, showed that exercise can shift the human body clock with the direction and amount of this effect depending on the time of day or night in which people exercise.

Exercising at 7 a.m. or between 1 and 4 p.m. advanced the body clock to an earlier time, and exercising between 7 and 10 p.m. delayed the body clock to a later time.

Exercising between 1 and 4 a.m. and at 10 a.m., however, had little effect on the body clock, and the phase-shifting effects of exercise did not differ based on age or gender, the researchers explained.

“Exercise has been known to cause changes to our body clock. We were able to clearly show in this study when exercise delays the body clock and when it advances it,” said lead author Shawn Youngstedt, from the varsity.

Lemon
Exercise can help you counter effects of jet lag, shift-based work. Pixabay.

“This is the first study to compare exercise’s effects on the body clock, and could open up the possibility of using exercise to help counter the negative effects of jet lag and shift work.”

The findings, published in The Journal of Physiology, suggest exercise could counter the effects of jet lag, shift work, and other disruptions to the body’s internal clock (e.g., military deployments) helping individuals adjust to shifted schedules.

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For the study, the team examined body clocks following exercise in 101 participants for up to five-and-a-half days.

The baseline timing of each participant’s body clock was determined from urine samples collected every 90 minutes to measure the time of the evening rise in melatonin and the peak of melatonin several hours later. (IANS)