Monday December 16, 2019

Exercise May help to Reduce Stroke Risk in Menopausal Women

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers examined 3,003 midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause

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Exercise
Exercise may cut the risk of stroke in menopausal women. Pixabay

Mid-aged women transitioning to menopause may be able to lower their risk of developing stroke, heart disease and Type-2 diabetes if they exercise more or eat a low calorie diet, suggests a research.

The study showed that physically active women were less likely to get incidents of metabolic syndrome than inactive women.

Metabolic syndrome describes a cluster of risk factors that increase the chances of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Genetic factors, excess body fat, and lack of exercise can add to its development.

Patients with metabolic syndrome are diagnosed when they have three or more of these risk factors — large amount of abdominal body fat, low (“good”) cholesterol, high levels of fat in the blood, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose.

Exercise is crucial for everyone. Pixabay

“Previous studies have largely focused on cardiovascular disease and Type-2 diabetes in postmenopausal women. This study is unique because it focuses on an earlier stage in women’s lives, the menopausal transition in midlife, to potentially prevent such diseases from occurring,” said Jennifer S. Lee, Associate Professor at the Stanford Health Care in the US.

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers examined 3,003 midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause.

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They identified patterns of cardiometabolic risk and found central obesity to be the most common factor for causing metabolic syndrome.

“Discovering which modifiable factors like physical activity and a lower calorie diet are more common in midlife women who recover from metabolic syndrome, in this study, could better inform what preventive strategies to consider in women earlier in their lives,” Lee noted. (IANS)

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Exercise may Trigger Migraine Attacks in Women: Study

Here's why exercise won't help most women suffering from migraine

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Migraine in women
Although regular aerobic exercise has been strongly recommended, it may trigger migraine attacks in women. Lifetime Stock

Despite doctors recommending regular aerobic exercise to prevent migraine, physical exercise can actually be a trigger of migraine attacks for most women because of “anxiety sensitivity” in them, find researchers.

“Anxiety sensitivity” refers to one’s fear of experiencing anxiety arousal due to harmful physical, cognitive and socially-observable consequences, may be related to physical activity (PA) avoidance in migraine patients.

Migraine affects around 10-15 per cent of the population around the globe, and among its most common diagnosis criteria include a throbbing, unilateral head pain, hypersensitivity to lights, sounds, odour, and aggravation by activity.

Although regular aerobic exercise has been strongly recommended by clinicians as an adjuvant option for migraine prevention, for up to one-third of patients, physical exercise can be a trigger of migraine attacks, thus, it can instead be avoided as a strategy to manage migraine, said researchers.

Migraine women
Women who suffer from migraine should avoid physical activity. Lifetime Stock

The study, published in the journal Cephalalgia and highlighted an overlooked relationship between migraine and exercise, was led by Samantha G Farris from Rutgers, Department of Psychology, the State University of New Jersey.

The researchers assessed 100 women with probable migraine, who filled an online survey covering anxiety sensitivity scores, intentional avoidance of moderate and vigorous physical activity (PA) in the past month, as well as the self-rated perception that exercise would trigger a migraine attack and worse migraine symptoms.

The results showed that increased anxiety sensitivity scores associated with PA avoidance of both moderate and vigorous intensities.

One-point increase in the anxiety sensitivity scale resulted in up to 5 per cent increase in the odds for avoiding PA.

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Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder, in which regular PA is part of current non-pharmacological treatment recommendations.

The authors wrote that “patients with migraine and elevated anxiety sensitivity could benefit from tailored, multi-component intervention”. (IANS)