Sunday September 23, 2018

Exposure to Smoke Linked with Respiratory Problems in Teenagers

Also, health professionals should educate teens on the dangers associated with tobacco use to prevent initiation

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Smoke
Second hand smoke linked to dry cough among teenagers. Pixabay
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As little as one hour of exposure to tobacco smoke per week can increase the risk of having respiratory symptoms, such as shortness of breath and a dry cough at night among teenagers, warns a study.

“There is no safe level of second hand smoke exposure,” said lead author of the study Ashley Merianos, Assistant Professor at the University of Cincinnati in the US.

“Even a small amount of exposure can lead to more emergency department visits and health problems for teens. That includes not just respiratory symptoms, but lower overall health,” Merianos said.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, involved 7,389 non-smoking US teenagers without asthma.

smoke
A man smoking cigarette. Pixabay

The findings showed that teenagers exposed to just one hour of second hand smoke per week are 1.5 times more likely to find it harder to exercise and two times more likely to experience wheezing during or after exercise.

They are two times more likely to have a dry cough at night and and 1.5 times more likely to miss school due to illness.

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“Healthcare providers or other health professionals can offer counselling to parents and other family members who smoke to help them quit smoking, and parents should be counselled on how to prevent and reduce their adolescent’s second hand smoke exposure,” Merianos said.

“Also, health professionals should educate teens on the dangers associated with tobacco use to prevent initiation,” she added. (IANS)

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Mental Health Issues Are Not Likely to Ruin Teenagers’ Friendships, Says Study

Compared to boys, girls tend to favour extended dyadic exchanges, and so they may respond to submissive behaviour with support and empathy, which may strengthen friendship ties

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Teenagers
Mental health may not ruin teenagers' friendships: Study. Pixabay

Teenagers with similar levels of mental health issues such as anxiety and depression are more likely to remain friends, but dissimilarites can create incidence instability, a new study has found.

“An important takeaway from our study is that children’s personal struggles need not adversely impact their social relationships,” said Brett Laursen, Professor at the Florida Atlantic University (FAU).

“Mental health issues do not necessarily ruin chances of making and maintaining worthwhile friendships,” he added.

Youth who resembled one another were more likely to remain friends from one year to the next.

“Behavioural similarity is tremendously important to a friendship. Shared feelings and shared experiences are the glue that holds a friendship together,” Laursen said.

For the study, published in the Journal of Research on Adolescence, the team included 397 adolescents (194 boys, 203 girls) in 499 same-sex friendships, who were followed from grade seven (median age 13), through to the end of high school in grade 12.

Teenagers
Youth who resembled one another were more likely to remain friends from one year to the next. Pixabay

They examined the degree to which internalising symptoms — anxiety, depression, social withdrawal and submissiveness — predicted the dissolution of teenage friendships.

In most respects, boys and girls did not differ in the factors that predicted friendship instability.

However, one notable exception was — differences on submissiveness increased friendship instability for boys, but decreased friendship instability for girls.

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“Compared with girls, boys are more competitive and confrontational in interactions with friends, suggesting that dissimilarity on submissiveness may be a liability when it comes to the activities that many boys prefer such as sports and games,” Laursen said.

“Compared to boys, girls tend to favour extended dyadic exchanges, and so they may respond to submissive behaviour with support and empathy, which may strengthen friendship ties,” he noted. (IANS)

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