Monday July 16, 2018

Exposure to Traffic-Related Pollution Poses Threat of Asthma in Kids

For the study, the researchers analysed data from 1,522 Boston-area children born between 1999 and 2002.

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Long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution may significantly increase the risk of asthma in early childhood, a study has warned.
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Long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution may significantly increase the risk of asthma in early childhood, a study has warned.

The findings, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, showed that living close to a major road was linked to childhood asthma at all ages examined.

“Children living less than 100 metres from a major road had nearly three times the odds of current asthma – children who either experience asthma symptoms or use its medications daily – by ages seven to 10, compared with children living more than 400 metres away from a major road,” said study co-author Mary Rice from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston, US.

The researchers found that traffic-related pollutants appeared to increase asthma risk in childhood.
Asthma Medicine, pixabay

For the study, the researchers analysed data from 1,522 Boston-area children born between 1999 and 2002.

The researchers used mapping technologies to determine the distance between each child’s home address and the nearest major roadway.

They also linked home addresses to census data and satellite-derived atmospheric data to calculate each participant’s daily exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) — tiny particles suspended in the air that when inhaled deposit in the terminal sacs of the lung.

Fine PM originates from fuel combustion, including traffic, power plants, and other pollution sources, the researcher said.

Also Read: U.S. Tobacco Companies Must Put New Warnings on Packaging, Court Says 

The research team also examined children’s daily exposure to soot, a component of fine PM also known as black carbon.

The researchers found that traffic-related pollutants appeared to increase asthma risk in childhood.

“Lifetime exposure to black carbon and fine PM were also linked to the asthma in early childhood (ages three to five years), but in mid-childhood (ages seven to 10 years), these pollutants were associated with asthma only among girls,” the researcher noted. (IANS)

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Fruit and Veg Diet ‘Can Fight Asthma’

The study adds to the evidence on the importance of a healthy diet in managing asthma and its possible role in helping prevent the onset of asthma in adults

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Eat more fruits, veggies to reduce asthma symptoms
Eat more fruits, veggies to reduce asthma symptoms. Pixabay

If you have asthma, switching to a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals may help in reducing the symptoms like difficulty in breathing, chest pain and coughing among many other things, according to a study.

On the other hand, those who take unhealthy diets, with high consumption of meat, salt and sugar, are likely to have the poorest relief from asthma symptoms, the study showed, suggesting the role of healthy diet in preventing the onset of asthma as well as controlling problem in adults.

“A healthy diet is mostly made up of a high intake of fruit, vegetables and fibre. These have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and are elements in a healthy diet that potentially lower symptoms,” said lead researcher Roland Andrianasolo, from University of Paris 13 in France.

“In contrast, the least healthy diets include high consumption of meat, salt, and sugar, and these are elements with pro-inflammatory capacities that may potentially worsen symptoms of asthma,” he added.

A healthy diet is mostly made up of a high intake of fruit, vegetables and fibre.
A healthy diet is mostly made up of a high intake of fruit, vegetables and fibre. Pixabay

The results also showed that for men and women with asthma who adhered to healthy diets, the likelihood of poorly controlled symptoms was lower by 60 per cent and 27 per cent respectively.

For the study, published in European Respiratory Journal, the team analysed data from 34,776 adults.

Overall, men who ate a healthier diet showed a 30 per cent lower chance of experiencing asthma symptoms, while in women with healthier diets, the chance of experiencing the symptoms was 20 per cent lower.

Also Read: Asthma Patients May be Over-Medicating

“The study adds to the evidence on the importance of a healthy diet in managing asthma and its possible role in helping prevent the onset of asthma in adults.

“Healthcare professionals must find the time to discuss diet with their patients, as this research suggests it could play an important role in preventing asthma,” the researchers noted. (IANS)