Friday November 15, 2019

Exposure to Traffic-Related Pollution Poses Threat of Asthma in Kids

For the study, the researchers analysed data from 1,522 Boston-area children born between 1999 and 2002.

0
//
Long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution may significantly increase the risk of asthma in early childhood, a study has warned.
Representational Image, Pixabay

Long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution may significantly increase the risk of asthma in early childhood, a study has warned.

The findings, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, showed that living close to a major road was linked to childhood asthma at all ages examined.

“Children living less than 100 metres from a major road had nearly three times the odds of current asthma – children who either experience asthma symptoms or use its medications daily – by ages seven to 10, compared with children living more than 400 metres away from a major road,” said study co-author Mary Rice from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston, US.

The researchers found that traffic-related pollutants appeared to increase asthma risk in childhood.
Asthma Medicine, pixabay

For the study, the researchers analysed data from 1,522 Boston-area children born between 1999 and 2002.

The researchers used mapping technologies to determine the distance between each child’s home address and the nearest major roadway.

They also linked home addresses to census data and satellite-derived atmospheric data to calculate each participant’s daily exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) — tiny particles suspended in the air that when inhaled deposit in the terminal sacs of the lung.

Fine PM originates from fuel combustion, including traffic, power plants, and other pollution sources, the researcher said.

Also Read: U.S. Tobacco Companies Must Put New Warnings on Packaging, Court Says 

The research team also examined children’s daily exposure to soot, a component of fine PM also known as black carbon.

The researchers found that traffic-related pollutants appeared to increase asthma risk in childhood.

“Lifetime exposure to black carbon and fine PM were also linked to the asthma in early childhood (ages three to five years), but in mid-childhood (ages seven to 10 years), these pollutants were associated with asthma only among girls,” the researcher noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Flavoured E-Cigarettes Affect Airways, Worsen Asthma

Certain flavoured e-cigarettes, even without nicotine, may change how airways, affected by an allergic disease, function, thus worsening the severity of asthma

0
e-cigarettes, flavoured, asthma, airways
A flavour multipack for the Juul vaping device. Sweet-flavored electronic cigarettes promote youth vaping. Wikimedia Commons

Certain flavoured e-cigarettes, even without nicotine, may change how airways, affected by an allergic disease, function, thus worsening the severity of diseases such as asthma, say researchers.

For the first time, a model of asthma was used to investigate the effect of a range of popular e-cigarette flavours, with and without nicotine.

“This is especially important for those with respiratory disease, whom are vulnerable to the effects of smoking,” Dr Chapman said.

“The majority of e-cigarette smokers use flavoured liquids but there is some evidence that flavour additives can be toxic when inhaled,” said Dr David Chapman from from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS).

The use of e-cigarettes has dramatically increased in the past few years, especially among younger smokers globally.

e-cigarettes, flavoured, asthma, airways
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Friday that they were investigating 215 cases of a serious lung disease possibly related to the use of e-cigarettes. VOA

Despite the suggestion they are a healthier alternative to tobacco cigarettes, there is a lack of evidence in both animal studies and human data on the effect of e-cigarettes on lung function.

The researchers found that some flavoured e-cigarettes, even in the absence of nicotine, can worsen disease severity.

“The exact effects on features of asthma were dependent upon the specific flavour, suggesting not all flavoured e-cigarettes will have the same consequences on lung health,” Dr Chapman said in the study published in Scientific Reports.

ALSO READ: Tech Giant Google Adds ‘Key Moments for Videos’ in Search Section

In this study, the flavour Black Licorice exaggerated airway inflammation whereas Cinnacide had the opposite effect, suppressing airway inflammation.

The researchers didn’t analyse the liquids directly, to confirm what they contained, however there is evidence from previous research that flavours categorised as “buttery/creamy” and “cinnamon”, which likely include “Banana Pudding” and “Cinnacide”, respectively, are toxic.

Caution should be taken in promoting the use of flavoured e-cigarettes to patients with respiratory disease such as asthma and that policy makers should consider restricting the use of flavoured e-cigarettes, the team added. (IANS)