Wednesday July 17, 2019
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External Advisory Council To Monitor AI Development of Google

Google last year published a set of internal AI principles which guides the ethical development and use of AI in its research and products

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The Google name is displayed outside the company's office in London, Britain. VOA

Google has established an external advisory council to help the tech giant develop the Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology in an ethical and responsible way.

The Advanced Technology External Advisory Council (ATEAC) will consider some of Google’s most complex challenges that arise under its AI principles, like facial recognition and fairness in machine learning, Google said in a statement.

“We look forward to engaging with ATEAC members regarding these important issues,” said Kent Walker, Senior Vice President, Global Affairs.

The council will hold four meetings, starting in April.

“We recognise that responsible development of AI is a broad area with many stakeholders.

Google on an Android device. Pixabay

“In addition to consulting with the experts on ATEAC, we’ll continue to exchange ideas and gather feedback from partners and organisations around the world,” said Google.

In December, Google CEO Sundar Pichai told The Washington Post that the company has “tried hard to articulate a set of AI principles.”

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“We may not have gotten everything right, but we thought it was important to start a conversation. We recognise that such powerful technology raises equally powerful questions about its use,” said Pichai.

Google last year published a set of internal AI principles which guides the ethical development and use of AI in its research and products. (IANS)

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Researchers Develop AI Algorithm That can Solve Rubik’s Cube in Less Than a Second

According to the researchers, the ultimate goal of projects such as this one is to build the next generation of AI systems

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Researchers have developed an AI algorithm that can solve a Rubiks Cube in a fraction of a second, faster than most humans. The work is a step toward making AI systems that can think, reason, plan and make decisions.

The study, published in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence, shows DeepCubeA — a deep reinforcement learning algorithm programmed by University of California computer scientists and mathematicians — can solve the Rubik’s Cube in a fraction of a second, without any specific domain knowledge or in-game coaching from humans.

This is no simple task considering that the cube has completion paths numbering in the billions but only one goal state – each of six sides displaying a solid colour – which apparently can not be found through random moves.

“Artificial Intelligence can defeat the world’s best human chess and Go players, but some of the more difficult puzzles, such as the Rubik’s Cube, had not been solved by computers, so we thought they were open for AI approaches,” said study author Pierre Baldi, Professor at the University of California.

“The solution to the Rubik’s Cube involves more symbolic, mathematical and abstract thinking, so a deep learning machine that can crack such a puzzle is getting closer to becoming a system that can think, reason, plan and make decisions,” Baldi said.

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“Artificial intelligence is now one of the fastest-growing areas in all of science and one of the most talked-about topics in society.” VOA

For the study, the researchers demonstrated that DeepCubeA solved 100 percent of all test configurations, finding the shortest path to the goal state about 60 per cent of the time.

The algorithm also works on other combinatorial games such as the sliding tile puzzle, Lights Out and Sokoban.

The researchers were interested in understanding how and why the Artificial Intelligence (AI) made its moves and how long it took to perfect its method.

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“It learned on its own, our AI takes about 20 moves, most of the time solving it in the minimum number of steps,” Baldi said.

“Right there, you can see the strategy is different, so my best guess is that the AI’s form of reasoning is completely different from a human’s,” he added.

According to the researchers, the ultimate goal of projects such as this one is to build the next generation of AI systems. (IANS)