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Social Media Giant Facebook Brings New AI-features For ‘Marketplace’ Shoppers, Sellers

Facebook said it had invested in detecting and removing inappropriate content from Marketplace

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This photo shows the logo for Facebook on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. VOA
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As Facebook celebrates the second anniversary of its “Marketplace”, the social media giant has introduced new Artificial Intelligence (AI)-powered features to help its buyers and sellers complete transactions faster.

Marketplace was introduced in 2016 as a place for Facebook users to buy and sell within their local communities.

It has grown to be a place where people around the world can discover things they love, connect with people locally, launch a business, and earn a living, Facebook said.

“We believe AI can fundamentally change the way people shop, and are excited about the potential opportunities and value it can bring to buyers and sellers,” Deborah Liu, Vice President, Marketplace, Facebook.

AI has already been used to make Marketplace more efficient and help sellers connect with more potential buyers by performing a variety of tasks such as improving the quality of photos automatically and translating Messenger conversations, among others.

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Facebook’s new AI features to help ‘Marketplace’ shoppers, sellers. Pixabay

The new features introduced this week use AI for price range suggestions and auto-categorization.

For example, if you wanted to sell your home office chair, Marketplace could use AI to help you sell it even faster by suggesting you price it between $50-75 based on what similar chairs recently sold for.

It will also automatically categorise the chair as “furniture” based on the photo and description, so that you don’t have to.

“We’re also testing camera features that could use AI to recommend products you might be interested in. Say you liked your friend’s headphones and wanted your own; you could snap a photo of the headphones and Marketplace’s AI technology could recommend similar listings for sale nearby,” Liu said.

In the future, AI could help simplify tasks like completing an outfit or home design project.

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Facebook App on a smartphone device. (VOA)

“For example, you could upload a photo of your living room and get suggestions on furniture to buy based on your layout and size,” Liu added.

Facebook said it had invested in detecting and removing inappropriate content from Marketplace.

Also Read- LG Introduces its New Flagship V40 ThinQ with 5 Cameras

“Thanks to our AI technology, we are working to detect and remove items that violate our policies by analyzing the images, content, and context within a listing,” Liu said. (IANS)

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Private Photos May Have Been Exposed Due To Facebook’s Flaw

Facebook has also come under criticism for fake political ads posted on its site from Russia and other countries.

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This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Facebook says a software flaw may have exposed private photos of nearly 7 million users, the latest in a series of privacy issues facing the social media company.

Facebook said Friday that the photo glitch gave about 1,500 software apps unauthorized access to private photos for 12 days in September.

“We’re sorry this happened,” Facebook said in a blog. It said it would notify users whose photos might have been affected.

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A smartphone user displays a Facebook newsfeed .VOA

Irish regulator to investigate

The software flaw affected users who gave third-party applications permission to access their photos. Facebook usually allows the apps to access only photos shared on a user’s timeline. However, the glitch would have allowed the apps to see additional photos, including those on Marketplace and Facebook Stories, as well as ones uploaded but not shared.

It is not known whether any of the photos were actually accessed.

The lead regulator of Facebook in the European Union, the Irish Data Protection Commissioner (DPC), said it was investigating the situation to determine whether the company complied with strict new EU privacy rules.

While Facebook says the bug has been fixed, the revelation brought new scrutiny to a company that has faced a series of security and privacy breaches.

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A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Earlier issues

Earlier this year, Facebook acknowledged that a political consultancy firm, Cambridge Analytica, gained access to the personal data from millions of user profiles.

In September, the company said it discovered a security breach affecting about 50 million user accounts that could have allowed hackers to access the accounts. The company said hackers exploited the “View As” feature, which lets users see how their own profiles would look to other people.

Also Read: Facebook Dismisses Report of Journalists’ Frustration With Fact-Checking

Facebook has also come under criticism for fake political ads posted on its site from Russia and other countries.

The company has more than 2 billion users worldwide. (VOA)