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Facebook Building New Artificial Intelligence (AI) Tool to Identify Offensive Memes

Further, Facebook is also continuing to invest in extending the text recognition model for the wide number of languages used on its global platform

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Facebook said "We identified some technical overlap with Russia-based activity we saw prior to the US midterm elections"

In a bid to curtail offensive memes that promote hate speech, Facebook is building a novel artificial intelligence (AI) system that uses machine learning to identify text in images and videos as well as transcribe it.

While tools to transcribe text are nothing new, the company faces different challenges because of the size, sheer volume of photos shared each day on Facebook and Instagram, and the number of languages supported on its global platform.

With the novel AI system called Rosetta, Facebook can process more than a billion public images and Instagram images and video frames (in a wide variety of languages) per day through the system efficiently.

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Facebook App on a smartphone device. (VOA)

The extracted text is then used by downstream classifiers to immediately act upon policy-violating content or by product applications like photo search.

“Understanding text in images along with the context in which it appears also helps our systems to proactively identify inappropriate or harmful content and keep our community safe,” the social media giant said in a blog post late on Tuesday.

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“Text extracted from images is being used to improve the relevance and quality of photo search, automatically identifying content that violates our hate-speech policy on the platform in various languages, and improve the accuracy of classification of photos in News Feed to surface more personalised content,” the networking giant noted.

Further, Facebook is also continuing to invest in extending the text recognition model for the wide number of languages used on its global platform. (IANS)

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Use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Fraud Detection to Triple by 2021

Texas-based ACFE is the world’s largest anti-fraud organization and premier provider of anti-fraud training and education

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The enterprise solutions major has integrated SAP CoPilot with the
"A tectonic shift is happening in AI. Nearly 85 per cent of enterprises globally will use AI in some form or the other by 2020.

As cyber criminals find new ways to exploit technology, a new survey has said that the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) for fraud detection globally would triple by 2021.

While only 13 per cent of organizations use AI and ML to detect and deter fraud, another 25 per cent plan to adopt such technologies in the next year or two — a nearly 200 per cent increase, revealed a global survey by the US-based Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) with global analytics leader SAS.

“As criminals find new ways to exploit technology to commit schemes and target victims, anti-fraud professionals must likewise adopt more advanced technologies to stop them,” Bruce Dorris, President and CEO of the ACFE, said in a statement late Monday.

About one in four organizations (26 per cent) use biometrics as part of their anti-fraud programmes and another 16 per cent foresee deploying biometrics by 2021.

“More than half of organizations (55 per cent) plan to increase their anti-fraud tech budgets over the next two years,” the findings showed.

By 2021, nearly three-quarters of organizations (72 per cent) are projected to use automated monitoring, exception reporting and anomaly detection.

AI
“We’re beginning to see the first instances of artificial intelligence operating as a mediator between humans, but it’s a question of: ‘Do people want that?” Pixabay

Similarly, about half of organizations anticipate employing predictive analytics/modeling (52 per cent and up from 30 per cent as of today) and data visualization (47 per cent from current 35 per cent).

The survey examined data provided by more than 1,000 ACFE members about their employer organizations’ use of technology to fight fraud.

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The survey respondents hailed from 24 industries globally. The size of their employer organizations ranged from less than 100 employees to more than 10,000.

“The dramatic rise of AI, ML and predictive modeling reveals that, beyond the hype, advanced analytics is helping investigators keep steps ahead of increasingly sophisticated fraudsters,” said James Ruotolo, Senior Director of Products and Marketing for Fraud and Security Intelligence at SAS.

Texas-based ACFE is the world’s largest anti-fraud organization and premier provider of anti-fraud training and education. (IANS)