Monday April 22, 2019
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Facebook Asking Users to Disclose Passwords of Their Personal Email Accounts

The additional login step was noticed over the weekend by a cybersecurity watcher on Twitter called “e-sushi"

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This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Facebook is asking users to disclose passwords to their personal email accounts in order to access the social networking platform, the media reported.

A message has been flashing on some Facebook users’ log-in screen, demanding them to enter the password of the email ID they built their Facebook account on, The Daily Beast reported on Tuesday.

“To continue using Facebook, you’ll need to confirm your email,” the message demands, followed by a form asking for users’ email password.

How widely the new measure was deployed remains unclear.

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Facebook: The platform allows for different types of content, which makes it ideal for diverse, interactive and entertaining content.

In a statement, Facebook said users retain the option of bypassing the password demand and activating their account through more conventional means, such as “a code sent to their phone or a link sent to their email”.

“We understand the password verification option isn’t the best way to go about this, so we are going to stop offering it,” the report quoted Facebook as saying.

Also Read- Microsoft, BMW Unveil Open Manufacturing Platform

The additional login step was noticed over the weekend by a cybersecurity watcher on Twitter called “e-sushi”.

The requirement from Facebook, which is already ill-reputed for user data and security breaches, has started making the rounds merely two weeks after Facebook admitted to have had stored around 200-600 million user-passwords in plain text, searchable by over 20,000 Facebook employees. (IANS)

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Facebook Still Hosting NZ Shooting Footage: Report

Facing flak, the social media giant is now exploring restrictions on who can use its “Facebook Live” feature

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A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Despite Facebook’s claim that the livestreaming video of the March 15 Christchurch shooting that killed 50 people was removed from its platforms, sections of the raw footage are still available for users to watch, the media reported.

According to a report in Motherboard on Friday, certain videos on Facebook and Instagram show sections of the raw attack footage.

“The world’s biggest and most well-resourced social media network is still hosting copies of the violent attack video on its own platform as well as Instagram,” the report claimed.

Some of the videos are slices of the original 17-minute clip — trimmed down to one minute or so — and are open to be viewed by anyone.

In one instance, instead of removing the video, which shows the terrorist shooting and murdering innocent civilians from a first-person perspective, Facebook has simply marked the clip as potentially containing “violent or graphic content”.

One of the clips shows the terrorist walking up to the first mosque he targeted, and opening fire. The video does not show the full attack, and stops at the 01:15 mark.

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Facebook App on a smartphone device. (VOA)

A Facebook spokesperson, however, said “the video did violate our policies and has been removed”.

The Facebook livestreaming of the New Zealand terror attack sparked global outrage. The video was viewed over 4,000 times before it was removed.

The video was later shared in millions on other social media platforms, including Twitter and YouTube.

Also Read- Jack Dorsey Admits Twitter Makes it Easy to Abuse Others

Facing flak, the social media giant is now exploring restrictions on who can use its “Facebook Live” feature.

Earlier this month, New Zealand’s privacy commissioner John Edwards labelled Facebook as “morally bankrupt pathological liars” after the social media platform’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg tried to play down the Facebook livestreaming of Christchurch shooting. (IANS)